mrkirker
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mrkirker

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mrkirker was last seen:
Apr 27, 2010
    1. pawn
      pawn
      yes Sir. He cut and run, all for the best I think.
    2. pawn
      pawn
    3. pawn
      pawn
      Merry Christmas to you as well. I just scored a BRNO Model #4, a 22lr rifle I have wanted for a long time. Hip Hip Horaaaay. :D
    4. pawn
      pawn
      thanks I will check out tractor supply as well.
    5. pawn
      pawn
      Johnny,

      Thanks for the concise reply to my gun safe shopping thread, I found it very useful.

      Mark
    6. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      Sure sounds as though they've got both 'new' and 'old' blood with THAT deal! UT didn't have very good luck with their other 'young' head coach, Bill Battle. They (UT) usually 'stumble outta the gate, then try to explain it away by saying, "Well, it's the first game, etc." I've looked at the upcomming season this morning; their first game is against Western KY University, who have recently 'jumped' to the next level. At least if Kiffen puts his foot in his mouth occasionally, it'll be an interesting season, at least OFF the field, LOL!
    7. pawn
      pawn
      He is in his early 30's and was a former head coach in the NFL. Has put his foot in his mouth on several occasions. Hired his father, Monte Kiffen as defensive coordinator. It should be an interesting season :)
    8. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      Oh yes, I'd heard that Fulmer was canned when the re-ups for season tickets nose-dived early last fall. So they've hired someone. Hope this guy has some life in him. I follow Florida more than the local school.
    9. pawn
      pawn
      He is the new Vol's coach, took Fulner's place.
    10. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      I feel kinda stupid, I have no idea who this person is! :)
    11. pawn
      pawn
      Lane Kiffen :confused:. Pro or Con?
    12. pawn
      pawn
      hey Johnny, k-ville took a t-storm pounding over the past few days. hope you are doing all right :)
    13. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      Pawn,
      Glad the "twista missed ya" (sorry, couldn't resist!)! I wonder, are we entering an active phase remis. of the mid-70's when every spring brought tornadic activity to the Cumberlands?
    14. pawn
      pawn
      yes, I was traveling west at the time and had to pull over near Cookeville until things settled down a bit. the tornado in cumberland county last week missed my house by about 1500 ft.
    15. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      Tom,
      RE: Methods of fighting: In your studies, have you noticed that in the beginning phases of a conflict, armies fight with the successful 'tactics' of the last war, while using the arms and materials developed since? Seems that despite all the 'war games', tactics lag behind weapons development, time after time.

      During most of the american civil war (slow learners!), both sides used the same 'mass fire' tactics successfully used with smooth bore muskets, totally ignoring the advantages and deadliness of the rifled musket. Experience has shown me that a 100-yard shot with a smooth bore musket is a tough shot to make, while a 300-yard shot with a rifled musket is 'do-able' most every time!
      If you would like, I would be willing to offer a few titles regarding the conflict that might be of interest. Or, I understand, there's the 'thrill of the hunt' in finding out things for oneself, LOL!
      Either way, take care, keep in touch.
      Johnny
    16. Teejay9
      Teejay9
      Not in the least! I have been remiss in my studies of that war, and only came to it later in life. I know far too little to form solid, unshakable opinions for or against. I know mainly of the romanticized version of the antebellum South. The leanings of the agricultural South and it's supply of a readily available workforce versus the industrialized North, adding in the staunch religious fervor of the times makes it very interesting. Some day I will attempt to tackle Foote's books on the subject. I did enjoy Catton because it was the first time I read in depth literature on the subject. There is something unimaginable about the method of fighting in that conflict. They just marched up opposite one another and stood there firing away. I have a photo in one of the books that shows a pile of amputated legs outside of a medical tent. I guess that's where the term "saw bones" comes from. I am glad to be among your "friends" and happy that I am one of yours. I enjoy a good discourse, and in no way do I become irate and unreachable with my opinions. Glad to hear from you, Tom
    17. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      Teejay,
      Yes, I've read and studied extensively upon the war. The problem with authors such as Catton is that they seem to have seldom actually studied or been effected by 'contemporary' articles and letters relating to life and commentary in the decade prior to hostilities, the decade in which sides hardened into non-compromising positions. Those authors that are effected by such contemporary readings are usually judged as being prejudicial toward 'The Cause' of reform historians. Wars seldom have 'one' reason, and a 'cause' of a war is simply a series of events leading to a 'tipping point' whereapon the dye is cast. Lincoln's election was that 'tipping point' for the slave owners, who held political and monetary sway in the old south.

      The more that I study and read, the greater my conviction that the phrase 'states rights' was simply a euphemism created to avoid the use of the word ‘slavery’, much as the phrase ‘peculiar institution’. Shrouded within the phrase ‘states rights’ was the ‘right’ for one man to own another, and most of us will agree that such a right is not worthy of the name.

      East Tennessee was a bastion of conservative values then, as now. At the time of the war's beginning East Tennessee challenged the illegal (by our states own constitution) actions of our governor leading to secession and requested to become a seperate state, since so few of us held to the tennants of the confederacy. My g-g-g-grandfather was 'caught up in the draft' and joined the rebels, much to the dismay of the family. Following the war, 'rebels' could not safely return to the state, thanks to Gov 'Parson' Brownwell (R, Knoxville) who turned a daft eye toward privations upon those who dared return. Instead, he moved to Southern Indiana with a former 'chum' from his regiment, Thomas Legion, Company C, where he met and married a cousin of his host, a Sarah Abigale Riley. After five years, and two children later, Parson Brownlow had moved to the US Senate, and the state house passed to the democrats, allowing a safe return to the exiles. Word of his service was NEVER mentioned in the family, and so it was forgotten. It wasn't until five years ago, while researching old census records that I discovered his actions during the war. (On an unrelated note: One of my employees, a naturalized citizen from the Ukraine, stated that one of the most amazing aspects of 'life in the US', is the fact that descendants of former 'rebels' can openly admit that relationship, without fear of reprisal! Truly, we live in a wonderful country.)

      Attended a seminar featuring Mr. Foote a few years ago. One of the attendees, 'blew' her ONE question to Mr. Foote, asking, "In your opinion, which was the BEST DRESSED Civil War general?" I cannot relate his response!

      Hope my minor disagreement with your opinion relating to the cause of the conflict does not impede our friendship, for if friends cannot argue and discuss differences, who in the world can?
      Johnny
    18. Teejay9
      Teejay9
      I see that you're a student of the War between the States. I've read all of Bruce Catton books, but have not had a chance at reading any of Shelby Foote's. Have you? Have you read Catton? You know, I used to think that that war was about slavery and such until I really read up on it. It was really about States Rights versus Federal intervention. Much like we have today. My Grandmother on my mother's side was born in TN, Knoxville, and she had kin that fought for the Confederacy. In the 40s, she was asked to join the Daughters of the Revolution, but didn't want to hook up with "snooty Yankees!!" Ha! She had an old CSA cavalry sword that had belonged to her grandfather. I don't know what happened to that, probably went to an aunt. Anyway, I've asked to be your "friend," as we share much of the same feelings and outlooks. I have admired your way of defusing some of the hotter heads amongst us. I'm sure we'd be friends in "real" life. TJ
    19. mrkirker
      mrkirker
      Winchester 52B
    20. pawn
      pawn
      Hello mrkirker.

      What rifle are you shooting in your profile picture?

      Cheers :)

      ~pawn
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    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] I don't know if dogs have a heaven, but there will be dogs in mine.