1 or 2

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by rik, Aug 6, 2003.

  1. rik

    rik New Member

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    Hey guys
    What's the diffeence betwixt single action, and double action?
    Also what gun is good for plate shooting competition?

    thanks
    rik
  2. 1952Sniper

    1952Sniper New Member

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    Single action means you have to manually cock the hammer before each shot. Double action means that the hammer is cocked as part of the trigger pull (or other means).

    When you see those old Western movies where the guy uses his left hand to "slap" the hammer back between each shot, that's single-action shooting.

    A double-action revolver will not only cock the hammer, but turn the cylinder when you pull the trigger.

    That is what you were asking, right?
  3. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    Rik......Sniper's reply refers to revolvers.

    There are also single action, double action, and double action (only) semi-automatic pistols. That's a bit more complex, but if you'd like to know about those, just ask.
  4. rik

    rik New Member

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    Thanks Sniper
    That is what I was asking, I thought it had something to do with that, but wasn't sure how it worked.

    Xracer
    I am definitely interested in what it means when refering to semi autos.

    Thanks again
    rik
  5. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    OK, Rik, here ya go.

    Single Action Auto: The hammer must must be cocked (in the back position) before firing. When the gun is fired, the slide moves back and recocks the hammer for the next shot. These guns are usually carried with the hammer cocked and the safety on...."cocked & locked". M1911-type guns are an example of the Single Action Auto.

    Double Action Auto: The hammer is down for the first shot. The first part of the trigger pull cocks the hammer and the second part of the trigger pull drops the hammer and fires the gun. The slide moves back and cocks the hammer for the next shot, and subsequent shots are single-action. The hammer can be "decocked" and carried in the down position. These guns are usually carried with the hammer down. The Browning HiPower is an example.

    Double Action Only Auto: The hammer is always down. The first part of the trigger pull cocks the hammer and the second part drops the hammer and fires the gun. The hammer returns to the down position after firing. These are carried hammer down. Most of the more modern designs are like this....Glock & many others.

    My personal preference is for the Single Action Auto due to it's lighter and more consistant trigger pull. But.......to each his own.
  6. 91/59

    91/59 New Member

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    I HATE it when people point out possible posting mistakes. It makes them seem like know-it-all idiots.
    Having said that........
    The Browning HiPower is mostly encountered in single action form. Although they did produce a double action version, the vast majority are SA.
    I only point this out in cause the original poster (rik) goes to a gunshop to get some hands-on experience and picks up a conventional HiPower and attempts to dry fire double action.
  7. Tony Mig

    Tony Mig New Member

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    Not to step on anybody's toes, but I thought it important to also point out that most modern day double action only semi-auto's are hammerless, as the Glock is the best example of this.
    This is not to say the gun has "no" hammer, it's that the hammer is not external.

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