1880 2nd Montenegrin Gasser info needed.

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by soko121, Jul 28, 2012.

  1. soko121

    soko121 New Member

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    Jul 28, 2012
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    Hello ,
    i have just acquired a rare Belgian 1880 Gasser. i am looking for more details on its history, specifically what caliber is it chambered in and where would i go for some cartridges ? whats it worth?
    here is information from the gun, “GASSER PATENT EXTRA sn 133683 GUSS-STAHL” is written just forward of the cylinder left side of gun, there is also a small marking or proof of what appears to be a very small star symbol with a capital “X”. this is to the right of the word Patent.
    Under the cylinder is a “VG “ stamp along with a apple with arrow proofing. Under this proof is “SHUTZ-MARKE”. Just to the left of this wording is another very small logo of what appears to be the same “star above a X”. The cylinder has matching serial number, on the inside of the cylinder, the cartridge extractor shows the number “14” in 2 places, one on the cylinder itself, and another on the actual extractor mechanism. There is also another “E.L.G.” in a circle and another “star above an X”. The top of the barrel has a crown over the “N 1”, the trigger frame has "14", as does the inside of the main frame section. i find this interesting as the number "14" is stamped on all minor pieces and the 133683 is also stamped on the side as pictures show and the barrel.

    I have also been unable to find any pictures that reference this hand cannon. It is almost 16 inches in total length. Any info greatly appreciated,

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  2. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    It is a Model 1870. The "N.I." stands for Nikita I, then the king of Montenegro. Schutz-Marke means Trade Mark, and the one shown is the Gasser trademark. "Guss-Stahl" means cast steel.

    Montenegro apparently never actually adopted a regulation revolver, but a number of different types have been designated as "Model 1870", including one without a top strap, a break top with a Pryse lock system, and the more-or-less standard one shown here. All are in 11.3 Montenegrin caliber.*

    Gasser was located in Vienna and made thousands of those guns there, but also sub-contracted to various makers in Leige, which is why your Gasser has Belgian proof marks.

    *The cartridge itself is something of a mystery and confusing. It is also called by at least a dozen other names, including the 11.75 Montenegrin revolver, which is the name used by COTW. White & Munhall also list an 11.5mm Montenegrin Gasser, which may be a variation of the the same cartridge, which was listed in a 1909 French catalog but apparently nowhere else. I don't know of any cartridge case which can be easily formed to use in that gun.

    Jim
  3. 3/2 STA SS

    3/2 STA SS Active Member

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    I would love to get one just for the "hey look what I have factor"
  4. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    You mean "My gun is bigger than your gun"??;):D
  5. Thalis

    Thalis New Member

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    RE: 11.3 mm M1870 Montenegrin Gasser infos

    Dear soko121!
    You have bought a very nice example of long barrelled 11.3 mm Gasser M1870 "Montenegrin" (or Montenegrino) revolver. This old baby is able to fire a .446" lead bullet of up to 313 grains to the target with remarkable accuracy and devastating results (equal or slightly superior of the .45 Colt or .44 S&W Russian). You are most welcome to view many excellent, thorough and well founded historical and technical observations on this remarkable antique revolver on www.luger.gunboards.com under the special topic: "Gasser M1870 11mm revolver". If you are interested to reload somme obsolete 11.3 mm Montenegrin ammo you may use BLACK powder (NOT any kind of smokeless powders, as the specific revolver is made by the milder and not so strong cast steel - aka GUSS STAHL), along with 11.75 mm Montenegrin hulls made by "Bertram Bullet Co" in Australia (available for sale in the U.S. market by "Midway USA"), .439" - .446" lead bullets, weighting 465, 370 and 370 grains respectively, which can be easily produced by melted lead after using the Bullet Molds # 446187, #439187 and #439186 made by "General Ordnance Development" in U.S.A. . Good luck with the new baby and let us kmnow your test firing results ...
    Regards: Thalis
  6. Thalis

    Thalis New Member

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    Mar 18, 2008
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    Once again hello to everybody!

    I have just encountered an excellent article written by one of the most well known authors of "Guns & Ammo" on reloading and test firing the famous but since a long time obsolete 11.3 mm Gasser M1870 "Montenegrin" revolver, whose original 11.3 mm ammo are probably even more rare than a hen's teeth. You may view on-line this excellent article along with 3 related videos on
    http://archives.***********.com/content/gasser-revolver?page=1
    I'm sure that everybody on this forum is going to like this URL :) !!!

    Regards: Thalis
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