1911 Feed Problems

Discussion in 'The 1911 Forum' started by RunningOnMT, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    i agree, it sounds like you've found the problem.

    i have found that when a problem occurs (with anything not just guns) most people overlook the easiest answer first, which usually turns out to be the cause of the problem
  2. hansom

    hansom Former Guest

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    Running, My Para LTC doesnt like 8 round mags and it doesnt like Wilson mags, it does the same thing as yours if i put a Wilson in or a 8 round mag in , it functions flawless with everything else including the 2 Para mags i got with it, the difficulty in driving home the mags is the giveaway , try only loading the 6 in the para mag and see what happens then load 7 and see what happens , forget about the wilson your para is not going to function with it, it got a different contour feed lip and a heavier than normal spring.

    Also remember that handguns were not designed to eject loaded ammunition , they were designed to eject shell only, if you gun doesnt have a lowered ejection port the ammo will hang up there.

    John moses Browning did not designed the 1911 to use a buffer, its like placing a foreign object in your body- it will cause problems .
    Check to see if your extractor or ejector is damaged , remember NOT TO put a round in the chamber then close the slide on a 1911, always load from a magazine.
  3. Dutch1911

    Dutch1911 New Member

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    Sorry to sound like a south end of a horse headed north. BUUUUUT... you're missing the obvious. Your buffers... lose them TODAY!!! Your 1911 wasn't meant to run with them, and I've never seen a buffer do more good than harm. Keep your springs up to date and you'll be fine.
    Magazines, keep them up to date too... and you'll be fine. I rebuild mine about every year. Reason for me, well I shoot a lot of rounds through my 1911's... 2000-3000 rds a year. If nothing else replace your recoil springs and magazine springs every 1000 rounds.
  4. DGG!

    DGG! New Member

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    How do you determine what the right spring poundage is? Are there different spring specs for magazines. What problems do a too light or too heavy spring cause when chambering a round? Obviously I've never understood the concept. My 1911's all have 18# recoil springs according to a gunsmith. Not sure how he knows this other than from experience.
  5. RunningOnMT

    RunningOnMT New Member

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    DGG,

    The recoil spring supplies the force to drive the slide home, stripping a round off the top of the magazine and seating it in the chamber. If the spring is too light it wont have the necessary force to fully chamber the round. If a recoil spring is too heavy it may impede the rearward motion of the slide from going back far enough to pick up a new round to chamber.

    Besides the issue of having enough or too little force to mechanically do the job, the force of a spring affects the timing of when all of this happens. Speed is important here as lacking enough momentum the round can stovepipe or lodge between the mag and the barrel hood or top of the slide.

    I would imagine that manufacturers fire thousands of rounds testing various weight springs to determine which weight provides the fewest stoppages. More experienced shooters than myself, especially reloaders could increase or decrease the weight to compensate for heavier and lighter loads. It's a matter of matching explosive force to mechanical force.
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2010
  6. DGG!

    DGG! New Member

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    Thanks, that makes sense. I realize it is called a recoil spring for a reason yet it seems that 1911 folks are forever playing around with them. It seems odd that when you buy a new 1911 model the manufacturer doesn't have a spec sheet for springs, etc. that show the range of FPS (pressures) that they will work with. Then there are extractor springs of different strengths to worry about.

    I guess when your gun is not cycling you have to change the recoil spring unless something else is goofing up the timing.
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