1918 Colt 1911 value

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by vlad0002, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. vlad0002

    vlad0002 New Member

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    Hi all,

    I'm buying this 1911 Colt and am looking for help on determining what is the fair price. It's all original (per seller), but the trigger, that have been replaced with a WWII style. Can be replaced back, I guess. Barrel is in ok shape, not bright, but with plenty of rifling left.

    Any help will be much appreciated.

    Thanks.

    Vlad

    Attached Files:

  2. Danny

    Danny Member

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    West Va
    I have 4 1911's and that is a very nice Colt there. On the collector market, with that condition, and finding the right person, 2200 tops. Hope this helps?
    Regards
    Danny:)
  3. Silver72

    Silver72 New Member

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    The trigger looks ok to me. Here's another 1918 Colt. Colt produced about 319,000 .45s in 1918, most of any year.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2009
  4. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    That's what I was thinking. Trigger looks right. One of the problems with the 1911 was the reach for the trigger was too long for some. So when they made the 1911A1, they cut the grooves in the side of the receiver, just back of the trigger, and made the trigger shorter. Your gun appears to have a long trigger on it, to me.

    Click on one of the guns in the "my collection", there on the left, and then on any of the "views" on the page that comes up, and look at the trigger length.
    http://www.model1911a1.com/
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2009
  5. Silver72

    Silver72 New Member

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    Here's a 1940 Colt, one of the first with the relief cutouts for the trigger and a short one trigger. Then a 1942 with the milled trigger, followed by a 1944 stamped trigger.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 25, 2009
  6. vlad0002

    vlad0002 New Member

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    Thank you all so much. Good, I'm glad the trigger is correct. This makes it all matching then. I made a deal for $1400, hope it's a good price.

    Now, if I want to shoot it, any advise there? The bore looks a bit "tired". I had this idea of getting a good new or used Colt 1911 bore and shooting it with that? To avoid the risk of daaging original collectible bore? Is it a sensible thing to do, or just plain crazy?

    Thanks again.

    Vlad
  7. Silver72

    Silver72 New Member

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    I'd inspected it closely with a very bright light for cracks and replace the recoil spring. You can put in another barrel but save the old one and the springs.

    Any light rust can be improver with oil, soaking for awhile, and then lightly rubbing with 0000 steel wool, carefully.
  8. Chambersaviator

    Chambersaviator New Member

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    Hi,

    I was reading over this forum and signed up just to tell you: I wouldn't shoot a gun that collectible very much. To tell the truth, if I were you I would buy a brand new Colt 1911 World War I reproduction or other nice Colt, and keep the old one in the display case.

    The old WWI slides are not tempered, and although these guns went through WWI (in some cases both World Wars) the accumulated build up of wear can cause the slide to crack. NOT something you want to happen! So I wouldn't shoot it. That's my two cents.
  9. Danny

    Danny Member

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    I can vouch for what Chamber said. I bought a 1918 many years ago out of Shotgun News. I was happy as a Lark until I broke it down for cleaning. That is when I found a hair line crack running in the bottom of the slide, about a 1/4 inch long. I would have never found it if I had not held it to the light. Shoot a clip through it, clean it & stow it away for your collection.
    Kind Regards
    Danny:)
  10. vlad0002

    vlad0002 New Member

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    Thank you very much, Chambersaviator and Danny.

    I shot the gun two weeks ago for the second time. It shoots beautifully, but now I'll make sure to examine the slide closely and will refrain from shooting it again any time soon.

    One thing I've noticed when cleaning the gun -- the rails of the frame have a few tiny pin-point dents. It almost looks like someone tapped the metal to close the gap and have the slide sit tighter on the frame. Interesting. Is it a known technique? I collect clocks, too, and this approach was commonly used in clock repair to correct the wear effect on the plate holes, before they started to re-bush the holes in mid-XX century.

    Here's the video of my friend shooting the Colt:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/vlad0002#p/u/37/shedg_0qEOE

    And here's me with my newly added 1904 Broomhandle (fitted with reproduction stock):

    http://www.youtube.com/user/vlad0002#p/u/6/zwN1xiIIBQc

    The conversation is in Russian.

    Thanks again.

    Vlad
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2010
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