1945 Remington Rand

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by koboldian, Dec 25, 2010.

  1. koboldian

    koboldian New Member

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    Hi All,

    Just received this tonight from my dad for Christmas! I have never owned a vintage model like this and have no idea about the pistol. I am mostly familiar with newer 1911 models, as I have a few Springfield's.

    I know the pistol had been redone. I looked up the date and its from 1945. My dad says a gunsmith from New York worked on the pistol, but didn't know when or by who.

    The barrel has a copper looking finish...I've never seen this before...

    I would appreciate any information you could provide. I'm really excited to learn more about this model.

    Sorry for the dirty pics...it's how I received it less than an hour ago.

    Thanks again!

    Jason

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  2. TheGunClinger

    TheGunClinger Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Nice gift! The sights have been changed as are the grips. The barrel is made by Flannery Bolt Co. The crossed cannons are the final inspection mark. Recoil spring guide looks odd. Mainspring housing should have 8 ribs but I cant see it. On left side of frame under the slide release there should be the initials FJA but the pic is on a bad angle to see. Might be refinished also. I am sure that there are more things others will spot but it will be a good shooter. Have fun and dont shoot your eye out!
    Merry Christmas.
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2010
  3. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    The recoil spring guide is an after market one with a built in buffer spring. The front part is a plunger backed up by a fairly stiff internal spring.
    I have a M1911 with an identical one
    The gun looks like a standard target conversion. Some were done by by local armourers for service pistol teams and other by civilian gunsmiths. I've had a number of them over the years including a couple issued to me when I was shooting in service league.
  4. Gamemaster 760

    Gamemaster 760 New Member

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    Basically of no collector value.
    A bunch of scabbed together parts...
  5. grcsat

    grcsat Active Member

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    You have a real nice shooter. Even though it has lost its value as a collector and now it is just a shooter, it is still a nice gun. All to often I have seen so called refinished 1911s that have been buffed to the point of being garbage. At least who ever did work on this gun had some brains and didn't totally destroy it.

    So now you know that it's not a collector, Go out and use it . And have fun.

    Forgot to mention, those look like the target Bo-Bar sights that I believe were once offered by colt as a set of target sights. I have a set just like them.
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2010
  6. koboldian

    koboldian New Member

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    Pretty sour?

    Thanks for you replies to everyone else!

    Happy Holidays!

    Jason
  7. old semperfi

    old semperfi New Member

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    i live in southern indiana,old country boy at hear
    if your dad has any more pistols like that im adoptable,brother. old semperfi
  8. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    I have to disagree with both statements. If a collector wants an example of what was called an "accurized" 45, this is one. As I said before many armorers built this type of 45 for use by service pistol teams. Every armory on every base I was stationed at in 20 years of active duty had a few of these for issue to the local pistol teams. The "conversion" consisted of tightening the slide rails, installing a trigger stop, fitting a match bushing, a trigger job and installing target sights. (Unsually eithe Micro or Bomar.) The only thing "non-standard" on the OP's are the grips. The military rules did not allow anything that resembles a finger or thumb rest.

    As for being "a bunch of parts", it is obvious that the responder never spent much time in a active armory/arsenal. Guns were brought in for repair or refurbishing and what was needed was pulled out of the parts bin without any attempt to keeping everything "matching". (The beauty of interchangability.)

    I'm not saying that this particular one was put together in a service armory, only that it is 100% typical of what was. ASFAIK, there is no way to confirm or deny just where it was done, but my money would be on that a military trained armorer did it.
  9. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    I also strongly dissagree with the above statement. It's quite obvious that some accuracy work was done on this old warhourse. Ask your Dad if he remembers who did the work and when. Also, is the frame and slide tightly fitted and how light is the trigger. I have seen these old pistols sell for a premium if done correctly. Also, have you shot it yet ? If so, what kind of group does it hold. All in all, this is a pretty interestering old pistol but I'd like to know the rest of the story. :)
  10. BillM

    BillM Active Member

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    Nice!!! Great example of either an armorer or civilian gunsmith "target gun".
    It was someome with some talent--the checkering on the trigger looks well
    done. Check the recoil spring before you start running factory loads through it. Some of these guns were set up as "softball" guns, with light recoil
    springs. Factory "hardball" loads will beat them up a bit.
  11. Dr342

    Dr342 New Member

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    Shouldnt be too hard to return to USGI configuration. Excellent Gift!!
  12. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    .

    We called them "Wad" guns as they were set up for wadcutters.;)

    Were it mine, I wouldn't change a thing except maybe putting some GI grips on it. Putting it back to "USGI" you just have another refurbed M1911A1. (The real value is when everything is original.) I think it's worth more as an GI accurized gun. (Prove that it isn't:p;))
  13. Gabob

    Gabob Well-Known Member

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    Strange. That recoil guide looks just like one I made many years ago. I thought mine was one of a kind.
    Nice example of an accurized 1911.
  14. RustyBarrel111

    RustyBarrel111 New Member

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    Whoa! Didn't know that Syracuse had a Remington factory back in the day!
  15. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    Bob, I have seen a few altered guide rods like that. Sort of an early full length guide rod I guess.

    I'd like to find out the whole story on this 1911. I know an x Air Force pistolsmith who built this type 1911 for their Blue Team. He is also from New York but moved from there many years ago.
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