.22 rimfire sound moderators??

Discussion in 'NFA Firearms & Related Items' started by bachus180, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. bachus180

    bachus180 New Member

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    I have a recently purchased ansultz .22 rimfire, when I bought it we fitted it with a parker hale sound moderator.. I was expecting it to be pretty silent. I'm using winchester super x subs and it still lets out a pretty audible crack. probably something like 1/3 of normal. I was hugely disappointed. the gunsmith reckons this is normal and the best I can achieve.

    when I was a kid I remember a guy who worked on the farm showing me his gun working... I was convinced it was just a whisper coming from his.. does anyone know which is the best sound moderator around..??

    thanks for your help.. btw in the uk here...
  2. ibtrukn

    ibtrukn New Member

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    dont no anything about sound "moderators" BUT silencers ILLEGAL unless U got Class 3 liscense :cool:
  3. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Bachus, unfortunately for us here in the U.S., silencers are illegal except with a class III federal license. In the U.K. you can have them. I believe what you remember of your friends rifle, it had a silencer, not a sound moderator.

    By the way, welcome to TFF. We hope you enjoy our humble home. Great bunch of people around here!
  4. bachus180

    bachus180 New Member

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    well hi.. and thanks for the welcome... I didn't realise the laws were different in the US and I always thought we had tough laws..lol.

    yes I did mean a silencer. I already have one.. just wanted a better one. .. for those unfortunate not to have one... it makes a huge difference when shooting vermin. we cleared a field last week of over 70 rabbits in less than 2 hours. now believe me we would never have achieved that without it!...

    thanks for your replies anyway.... cheers
  5. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

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    Once and for all, could we please refrain from telling people suppressors are illegal. They are not! Though some States restrict them, other States do not.

    Texas for example reqiures a two hundred tax stamp and a background check, if approved, you can purchase a suppressed rifle/pistol and or a Class III rifle(ie. Machinegun/pistol.)

    Thank you.

    LTS
  6. stash247

    stash247 New Member

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    Point of info: Texas requires a signature from CLEO, where you live, as demanded on the forms the Feds require. The Feds collect the $200 Tax Stamp, and issue same.
    Texas, true enough, is a good place to be for class III weapons, ditto, Az.
    The FEDERAL law, from 1934, enacted the tax, but allows tax paid transfer/sale/purchase, since they get paid, every time. Some states get a bit more pissy, but look around, and there are several very tolerant places to be, if that's your deal! Beau Watkins, long time Sheriff of Uvalde County, Tx., is into this stuff, big time! Does this suggest options???
    Hope this helps...Terry
  7. Jim Bell

    Jim Bell Guest

    I had a sound moderator once made by Parker Hale. It consisted of a large tube with a smaller Tube coaxially inside it. The smaller tube was fastened to the front nut and did not reach quite all the way to the rear or muzzle of the rifle (22). The bullet left the muzzle and after travelling about 2 inches entered the small tube. OK so far. The thing was noisy until I filled the large tube with aluminum wool at which time it got pretty quiet but not like you see on TV.
    I worked for a Police force in those days so in the interest of improving the silencer effect we made a silencer that consisted of stacked steel baffles (washers) and coil springs . We kept adding washers and springs until the sound practically dissappeared and you could hear the firing pin strike. At first try you would think the round misfired. This type of silencer is called a STEMPLE and is a French design. The silencer was about 12 inches long. Surprisingly it was quiet for some low velocity rounds and not so quiet for other supposedly low velocity ammo. The setup was not accepted because it extended the barrel length by that extra foot.
    The next experiment was to drill .062 holes all along the underside length of a 22 barrel to bleed pressure off. A high velocity round never attained full velocity and the gasses were bled away long before the bullet exited the muzzle. Now there was a quiet rifle.
    I've often considered using an old 22 and having all those port holes drilled along it's length. That way you would not require a permit for a silencer - - - - or would you.
    Jim
  8. stash247

    stash247 New Member

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    Jim, I'm gonna tell you, save the machine time for a worthwhile project.
    If you drill the barrel, on the top, bottom, or sides, the reduction in sound will not be measureable, unless the gasses are vented into a container, big enough to first, recieve them, and, second, to allow them to vent more slowly. This 'can', constitutes a 'device designed or created to reduce the noise of firing', and can cost $10K, US, and 10 years, if un-registered!
    Fill out the forms, send them the money, wait for approval, and jump through all the hoops, and you can buy/build one. Omit a step, and you will not pass Go, but go directly, to jail!
    Does the term "mens rea" mean any thing to you? The courthouse interpretation is "legal intent", and, in simple terms, means that, if you intended to avoid the law, by whatever means, you are already guilty!
    Don't get caught up in all of this nonsense; do it legal, or, not at all!
  9. Jim Bell

    Jim Bell Guest

    Hey Stash 247,
    I'm not in the USA.
    I was referring to a rifle that was modified overseas.
    The "porting" all along the length of the barrel did reduce the sound appreciably . The results were better than the baffle type suppressor.
    The sound was more of a high pitched hiss like a dog whistle. Zippp!
    The Stemple type works well but you have to start with a long tube and keep adding baffles and springs till the sound drops away down. Then you cut the tube to length and cap it. Surprisingly, the stemple works better with heavy steel washers rather than Aluminum washers. The original Stemple Patents show Pistons to give better sealing.
    Jim
  10. stash247

    stash247 New Member

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    Bachus: We all may have missed the forest for the trees; you are using standard velocity ammo, right???
    Anything that exits the muzzle above about 1080 fps will craete a ballistic 'crack', a miniature 'sonic boom', so to speak.
    Just a (after) thought. Terry
  11. RedLeg

    RedLeg New Member

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    greetings all
    A moderator and a suppressor aka silencer are one in the same, different terminology for the other side of the pond.

    Bachus, might suggest you look for a different moderator. The Parker Hale is pretty much an old standard in the UK, but there are newer better makes/models available. Providing you are using subsonic ammo, try putting a few drops of light oil in the moderator. The liquid will help lower the sound emitted. A neoprene cover helps with the ping that you sometimes get as the projectile leaves the barrel.

    Here is a good article that compares some of the more common suppressors.
    http://www.shootingtimes.co.uk/guns/121761/Sound_moderators_for_22_rimfires.html

    Cheers

    Frank
  12. mrkirker

    mrkirker New Member

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    Have been discussing this issue with my gunsmith. Says that there are many different levels of quality and effectiveness in silencers. As mentioned above, sub-sonic ammo is required for the 'best' results, this might cause a problem if hi-vel is needed for the firearm to cycle, unless recoil springs are changed out, then one is commited to low-vel, till changed back again. His advice: If one is making the plunge, go 'first-class' and don't look back.
    Have been with a .308 so equipped, and could have fired it all day without ear protection.
  13. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    Bachus - Let me welcome you to TFF. What did you'll do with all them rabbits. That would sure make one heck of a stew - for the whole neighborhood.
  14. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    There is no "Class 3 Permit" in the US! There is a federal tax and registration of certain weapons.
  15. Enfield

    Enfield New Member

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    Hi Guys
    it just so happens that suppressing 22's is a bit of a hobby of mine

    I have worked on various designs over the years and have come up with 2 that seem to work.

    The first is an over barrel suppressor that obviously fits over the barrel and protrudes slightly in front, the idea being that you have a series of baffles in front of the muzzle and a chamber behind. It seems that the blast hits the first baffle then deflects to the rear slows and cools down the gas then goes through the forward baffles and exits. I like this design for retro fittting because 1, it works well and 2, I think it is much better to have 2 points of support rather than just hang it off the end of the barrel (I have seen a few work loose - not nice :eek:)

    The second design works on a similar principal but invloves more mods to the gun, this time I cut the barrel down to about 14" then fit a full suppressor tube over the entire length of the barrel - this obviously means that you have to machine the wood work to suit and have to fit a scope because you loose the sights. Surprisingly they still seem to be accurate enough for what we are doing out here (pest control at night) and the last one I tested was shooting sub 1" groups at around 50 yards

    The first design seems to work better than most commercial ones that I have tried and the second design is silent.

    I have attached some test data (as I managed to borrow a decibel meter from a friend). Now decibels are a horible unit to understand but with help from a chap on here I managed to determine that the over barrel suppressor cuts the noise by around a third and the full suppressor cuts it by about two thirds (you just hear the spring click)

    Anyway I thought that this may be of interest and have added a few attachments - my Walther G22 with one of my over barrel suppressors, A bolt action that I have fully suppressed and some data obtained when I tested them

    Cheers

    Enfield

    Attached Files:

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