.357 recoil question

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by thunderstruck507, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. thunderstruck507

    thunderstruck507 New Member

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    It seems when I shoot heavier bullets the recoil goes up and this is mentioned in several articles I've read before. What are the physics of explaining this?

    When my roommate was ordering some ammo from Double Tap for me he asked why I wanted the 125gr instead of the 158gr or larger and I told him for the more controllable recoil and from I've read they are less likely to overpenetrate. He contests that bullet weight has no bearing on recoil and from my experience even with Winchester white box I disagree.
  2. 22WRF

    22WRF Well-Known Member

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    my 158's recoil more than my 148's because I use a heavier charge:eek:
  3. thunderstruck507

    thunderstruck507 New Member

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    well i just went to the range since the Double Tap ammo arrived, 125gr gold dot 1600fps w/4in barrel, and they had noticeably less recoil than the budget remington 158grain sjhp cheap ammo ($30 per box of 100)
  4. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    It is just like 22 said heavier bullets usually have more of an inital charge
  5. Ursus

    Ursus New Member

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    Actually, the powder charge it´s only part of the answer. If you were to use different bullet weights with the same powder charge, the heavier bullet will always recoil the most.
    This is because of Newton´s third movment law that states that for every action, there´s a equal and opposite reaction. That is, if you push a rock with a force of 50 pounds, the rock will resist with an equal force in the opposite direction. Of course, the ammount of force that the rock exert, can not exceed its own weight.
    Thus the heavier the rock, the harder to move it. That difficult to move the heavier object is what causes the the more accentuated recoil sensation when yo shoot heavier bullets.
  6. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    What Ursus said. That charge has to push harder to move the heavier bullet and that means there is going to be more recoil.
  7. ryan_marine

    ryan_marine New Member

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    Let me do this the quick way. If you have to lift 10lbs, while standing, your transfering the extra energy that is felt by your shoes. If you lifting 20lbs in the same manner you shoes feel more because of the added weight.

    Hope it helps.

    Ray
  8. Peanut Man

    Peanut Man New Member

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    Weight of the bullet is just one part of the equation. The recoil "force" has several factors including the rate of the powder "burn." That is why a larger caliber, loaded to relatively low velocities (.45 Colt, 255 gr SWC, at 700fps) gives you a nice little "push" and not the "oh my Gawd" recoil of a .454 Casull, 300 gr JHP with 30+gr of 296 behind it. I think the "energy" figures might give you a better figure to base recoil on, because it takes into effect not only bullet weight, but velocity.

    Tom
  9. 45Smashemflat

    45Smashemflat New Member

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    Newton's first law - for ever action there is an equal and opposite reaction. For one loading versus another, the one pushing more energy out the front of the gun, will generate more recoil out the back end. Now, as has been mentioned, there are several facets of recoil that have to be taken into consideration to determine which "feels" worse. But generally the rule will hold if the gun remains the same.
  10. denfoote

    denfoote New Member

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    F=mA and you can't push on a rope.
  11. Uncle R.

    Uncle R. New Member

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    The applicable rule is conservation of MOMENTUM. There is also a jet effect from the powder gases exiting the barrel but the MOMENTUM of the handgun's recoil will equal the MOMENTUM of the bullet and powder gases.
    Momentum is calculated using mass x velocity, while energy is calculated using mass times velocity squared. So if you have two different loads each with (say) 300 foot-pounds of energy, the one with the heavier bullet will always kick more if the guns are equal in weight.
    :confused:
    With maximum loads in any caliber heavier bullets will deliver more momentum to the target, and will recoil more.
  12. Ursus

    Ursus New Member

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    Right on.
  13. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    Welcome Uncle R
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