.380 - Walther PPK or Beretta

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by BigV, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. stash247

    stash247 New Member

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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stash247
    And, while I'm sure this will start some debate, in a 2" revolver, at household/defensive distances, my ammo choice is a 140 gr flush seated wadcutter, right out of the target ammo box; full caliber hole, minimal recoil and flash= maximum results!



    Stash, why that load?
    Everything I am hearing is that the wife is an infrequent, or new shooter.
    She will tire of the sport very quickly, if it hurts, or startles her, and poor choice of ammo in a light weapon, with a short barrel, will do all of that.
    I load wads by the case, and so, they are very available, for practice, particularly, for my girls, when they were younger; I believe the adage that "You fight as you train".
    I can load 'party poppers', with a 88 gr jacketed bullet, designed for the .380, the will expand like popcorn, in a 2" gun, but these are very loud, even outdoors, and will 'light up your life', and the room, in the dark. This makes a second, aimed shot, difficult, even for a seasoned shooter.
    Short of such a dedicated load, there exists no really high performance load, for a 2" gun; there's simply not enough barrel!
    The Target loads(2.7 of Bullseye), offer, as I said before, a full caliber hole, minimum recoil, and flash.
    For any of you, who have never fired a weapon in a closed space, like a house, DON'T, unless you cannot avoid it; it raises the sound pressure at least two levels of magntude (100X), compared to outdoors.
    I have no hearing in my right ear, hear poorly from my left, and I wear hearing protection, all the time; indoors hurts me, even so.
    P-shooter, I recommended the load because it is cheap, easy, readily available, and not likely to deter the young lady from continuing to explore shooting; with a single well placed shot, it will drop any man; poorly placed, empty the gun, and the threat will surely 'go away'.
    Feel free to e-mail me at vfubar@aol.com, or IM, if I can further clarify.
    I'm not trying to 'slam' you, or anyone else, rather, to share some first hand knowledge about what works, based on empirircal data, and first hand experience: everything I have written, my kids got, 15 or more years ago, with an eye to their outliving me.
  2. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Depends on Uncle Sam's whim every 3 yrs.
    Just want to toss in my .02 on women and legth of trigger pull.

    As of lately I figure about a third of the people I train to shoot are female and I've come to look for a lot of things that are particular to their usually smaller dimensions. A lot of engineering on weapons just never factored in what a 4'10'' woman would have to improvise to effectively use the equipement. Ya know...lol.

    Anyway, on trigger pull. I learned to assume nothing. Most womens' hands look much smaller, however, a lot of that is accounted for by slender build, not length of digits. When she actually grips the weapon her slim fingers may let her get a similar or equal reach to a mans. Of course some people just straight up have short fingers, stubby fingers, or tiny hands all around so this isn't always the case.

    Quick example. My girlfriend stands about as tall as my shoulder, chin high at the most, but when she puts her hand in my palm her fingers are only about half an inch shorter than mine. Go figure. A DA gun that fits my hand would give her trouble, but we can shoot the same SA all day (provided recoil isn't bad).

    Just my advice for future purchases: have your lady hold/dry-fire the pistol before you assume it's too big. Or at least measure her trigger reach to yours and compare before you decide. You could rule out a good gun for the wrong reason.
  3. spaided

    spaided New Member

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    Mar 17, 2006
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    Montgomery, Alabama
    Walther is my choice...I love mine and i have NO problems at all. I do have the PPKs (made in the US) but it works GREAT. And its so small. If i could change one thing maby another round or two would be a great add.
  4. Light Coat

    Light Coat New Member

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    Got a pile of Walthers. Want more Walthers. Just plain nuts about Walthers.

    Here's the "but". The trigger pull in DA may be a bit heavy for a woman's preference on the Walther PP-PPK-PPK/s patterns. It is too heavy for some men too. That's equality I tell you.

    Everybody has too feel their way into their right hand extension. Left hand extension to you lefties. I know a couple of ladies that like .44 Mag and own 1911A1's to boot. It's all the person I tell you.

    Try everything once. If you like it; do it again. If you really like it; buy a safe full of it.
  5. armen

    armen New Member

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    Mar 23, 2006
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    Walther PPK issues

    I bought my PPK around 5 years ago after shooting one at the Try and Buy day at the local range. The store owner begged me not to buy it as they were notorious for stovepiping. Mine is one of the American made ones before Smith moved the plant.
    A few things were lousy-trigger pull was too heavy, racking the slide was difficult, and the gun stovepiped every 20 rounds or so no matter what ammo I used. A call to Wolff got me the lightest springs they said would work, which lightened the triggerpull and made it easier to rack the slide.
    I engaged in a little head scratching about the stovepiping problem. first I polished the feed ramp and the chamber (barrel) to allow a round to enter and exit easier. That helped a little, but didn't eliminate the stovepiping. Then I carefully tapered, contoured, and polished the leading edge of the extractor, figuring that it was having a hard time climbing over the rim of the cartridge. This made all the difference in the world.
    The stock plastic grips cracked after 6 months, so I bought Hogue wood ones.
    Later, an S+W rep told me that all PPKs give grief until you run 500 hot rounds through them.
    The gun is very accurate for it's size.
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