.44 magnum

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by rowdyredneck, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. rowdyredneck

    rowdyredneck New Member

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    I'm looking to buy a Ruger Super Redhawk .44 magnum with a 7 1/2 inch barrel. I've never shot a .44, the biggest I've ever fired is my .357 mag and I'm wondering how harsh the recoil actually is on a .44 compared to the .357? While I prefer shooting .38 special in my .357, I can handle the recoil of the .357 with no trouble, so I'm wondering how nasty the .44 really is? I don't know anyone who has one that I can test fire and the gun dealer won't let me try it out. Also, is the accuracy range of the .44 mag comparable to the .357, or is it better at longer ranges?
  2. cec

    cec New Member

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    I have fired a .44 Mag a few times and didn't find the recoil any more harsh than a .357 mag round. Granted I wouldn't want to put a few hundred rounds through at a time, but after 50 rounds in about 20 minutes I didn't have a sore hand or arm.
  3. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    The .44 Mag aint that bad. I've got one just like what you want and love it other than the price of the bullets. Don't remember what the .357 is like, but it can't be much worse.
  4. Bill

    Bill New Member

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    I have the 7.5 inch Super Redhawk and find it very comfortable to shoot but its way more kick than a .357 Mag, at least with heavy or max loads in the .44.
    I have shot thousands of rounds thru both and the .44 remains one of my most fun guns to shoot. To me the SRH is more tame in the hand than the Super Blackhawk which would occasionally bite my hand. Don't have that problem with the SRH which I believe has a better designed grip for recoil.
    I really love the .44 as it can be reloaded in so many different ways and almost all reasonable loads shoot accurately.. I like the .357 too (my second favorite) but it seems to be slightly more finicky liking only certain loads.
    Go for it if you have a good reason or just a desire for more powerful handgun... Bill
  5. punchie

    punchie Member

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    Really not much difference in recoil. How you percieve the recoil is something else. The 357 has more of a slap and the 44 more of a thump (or push) to me. Either is quite manageable as long as you overcome the dreaded "flinch". And yes, I have shot thousands of rounds of each.
  6. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    RowdyRedneck:

    Perceived recoil is a personal thing but several things make it hurtful. First is the power level of the ammunition. You can buy mild loads and thumper heavy loads. Secondly is the weight of the firearm. Light guns like a 2 inch revolver is going to hurt right away while a heavy revolver like an Anaconda or a Dan Wesson or a Super RedHawk will absorb a lot of the recoil. I once shot my Thompson Contender with a 10 inch barrel (read light) with hot loads and it hurt after just two shots!

    I shoot 44 mag all the time but I take 44 mag cases and load them down to 44 SPL levels. While they push harder than 357 the perceived recoil to me is easier to handle then the sharp recoil of the 357 mag. I do not shy away from recoil and indeed like big healthy guns but full load 44 mag in a light gun can be brutal. I have a friend who is a small caliber (22 and pellet gun local champion). You ought to see him flinch with anything other than those low recoiling guns. He is a rather large individual as well. He shoots recoiling handguns like a complete novice. He is indeed recoil sensitive. How about you?

    LDBenentt
  7. rowdyredneck

    rowdyredneck New Member

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    I am a bit sensitive to harsh recoil. I grew up shooting .22's and the recoil from my Ruger Super Single Six .22 revolver doesn't phase me. I do have trouble with heavy, hard hitting recoil in the form of flinching. I have a Remington 700 ADL rifle chambered for .270 Winchester with a target scope. While there are harder kicking rifles out there, the .270 packs a pretty good punch and I have bruised my shoulder from only a dozen rounds on it. I've tried hard over the years and I still flinch whenever shooting targets at long range (200+ yards) where extreme concentration is required. The split second before the gun fires I break my concentration and lose focus. If I can use a solid rest it isn't as much of an issue.
    I can handle the recoil of the .357, my 686 has a 4 inch barrel so there's plenty of muzzle flip and blast to contend with but its manageable. I do find myself flinching whenever I shoot .357 but I don't have much trouble with .38 special. Its a very frustrating problem.
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2005
  8. Bill

    Bill New Member

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    In adddition to my .44 SRH and .44 Dan Wesson I also have the 10 inch .44 mag Bull barrel Tompson Contender...Like previously reported the TC is brutal. The guns recoil is straight back into the wrist and for me its no fun to shoot. However my .30-.30 14 inch barrel on the TC is a joy to shoot and delivers more energy.
    Heavy recoil doesn't trouble me much as long as it doesn't hurt. I would flinch sometimes with my Super Blackhawk anticipating a painful bite. Not an issue with the SRH however or DW. I'd like to sell the TC barrel and buy just about any other barrel for that pistol. Any offers???
    Bill
  9. rowdyredneck

    rowdyredneck New Member

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    Thanks for all the input. I called around and found the best price through a private dealer. He has his federal firearms liscense and sells guns on the side so he can order anything I want. I ordered the Super Redhawk this morning, so I should have her by Monday. :) It was hard, very hard to justify the expense but I figured over the years it will be worth it. And besides, you can never have too many guns, right? ;)
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2005
  10. Bill

    Bill New Member

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    Watch out Rowdy, your new SRH may become your favorite firearm. They are so well made, balance beautifully and accurate. If you're not into relaoding you might want to consider it as the .44 has a wide range of light to very heavy loads. The SRH will digests all them very well. Just another thought, because my eyes aren't so good anymore I put a reddot on mine and the gun still maintains its fine balance. Its a very nice combination.
    Bill
  11. rowdyredneck

    rowdyredneck New Member

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    I'm interested in reloading but I don't know much about it. I live near a Cabela's store and I went there today and picked up two boxes of ammo, one .44 magnum and one of .44 special. I talked with the sales clerk about reloading, he knew alot about it and advised me that handgun cartridges are a little tougher to reload than rifle cartridges because of the crimp involved. He said if you don't crimp them tight enough the recoil will drive the bullets back into the cases on the unfired cartridges, and if they are crimped too tightly the cases will bulge when fired. I would definately like to learn it since .44 magnum cartridges are pretty expensive, I figure I could reload for about half the cost of buying new. I'm keeping my S&W 686 .357 so I could reload those as well as rifle cartridges for my .270. I was looking at some presses online, I know the Dillon are about the best but they are a little out of my price range right now. Any recommendations for a decent press under $200? I was looking at the Lee Aniversary package.
  12. john fox

    john fox New Member

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    I did have heavy recoil with my homemade hot 44 mags in my SRH. Didn't want to shoot anymore after 15 rounds. I do have small hands. I had the gun magnaported and installed Hogue grips on it. Now it feels like a 357 and is my favorite gun for hunting hogs.
    I can now shoot a hundred rounds without discomfort.
  13. Bill

    Bill New Member

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    I taught myself how to reload and I use a simple Hornady press. I've not had any difficulty obtaining the right crimp. For lighter loads I frequently don't crimp and I've never had any problems with my 44 or 357. Straight case pistol cartidges are easy to reload in my humble opinion. The die sets you buy for the press adequately instruct how to properly crimp. Most folks who reload do alot more shooting than those that don't. It's a fun activity to while away a few evening hours and saves lots of money in the long run.
    Bill
  14. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    Rowdyredneck:

    Note that you can also buy light loads in 44 mag cases. Because the 44spl is not very popular the ammo tends to be a little more expensive than light loads of 44 mag, but you just have to shop around.

    As for reloading don't buy the progressive Lee. It is a nightmare compared to a Dillon. My Lee Progressive broke every time I reloaded with it. My Dillion is nearly 20 years old and has worked flawlessly for me the whole time, reloading about 25 different caliber cartridges. Revolver cartridges are easy to reload if you follow the provided instructions for setting up the dies. Every reloading manual you buy from Sierra, Hornady, Speer, Hodgdon, Lyman and others includes a very good primer on reloading both rifle and pistol cartridges. Before you purchase anything buy one of those manuals and read it thoroughly. I highly recommend Dillon and RCBS reloading products. Others make some fine stuff but those two consistently make superb reloading equipment.

    LDBennett
  15. rowdyredneck

    rowdyredneck New Member

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    I brought her home last night but because of rain I wasn't able to shoot it for the first time until tonight. My first impressions are good, I started out with the .44 special loads to get a feel for things. Recoil is very light with .44 special, I think pretty comparable to shooting .38 special in my .357. I shot about six rounds from 25 yards on a solid rest, adjusting the sights every time until I was hitting close to where I wanted. I fired about three more shots to verify things, then switched over to the .44 magnum loads. Recoil wasn't as harsh as I expected, I found it to be tolerable and not really uncomfortable. The only thing I noticed is my trigger finger seemed to take a beating when shooting the magnums. The recoil from the magnum loads tends to slice the trigger into the side of my index finger like a knife blade. After about four shots my finger was hurting. Nothing serious, I can wear a glove if it continues to be a problem. I was shooting from about 25 yards and landed most of my shots within a 6 inch circle shooting off hand. Just for kicks I filled an empty beer can with water, set it on a fence post, and shot it with a .44 mag load from about 15 yards. The can literally exploded, it ripped wide open, almost turned itself inside out, and split into three pieces. To me there's something extra fun about shooting targets that explode on impact :) I still need to fine tune the sighting, I need a solid rest and some sand bags to really tune it in. I doubt I will put a scope on it, I looked at them the other day and they seemed to be pretty finicky with the eye relief. It seemed unless I held it just right I couldn't get a full picture inside the scope. I like the red dot scopes though, I may put one of those on in the future. As far as my ammo costs, I picked up my ammo at Cabela's. The .44 special are PMC 240 grain and cost $15.99 for a box of 50 and the .44 mag are Winchester white box 240 grain that cost $19.99. I have since found a place online that has PMC .44 mag loads for $12.99 a box plus shipping. I looked at an RCBS loading press at Cabela's, I think the price was around $269. I live near a Gander Mountain store too, I'll try to get there next week and check their equipment out.
    The RCBS comes with a Speer reloading manual. I know practically nothing about reloading but it is something I would like to learn. Do the presses come with decent instructions on how to perform every step for a beginner like me? Or do I need a reloading manual like Lyman's? I would like to find some good clear instructions on the reloading process so I know exactly what I'm getting into before I buy the equipment. Cabela's has the Lyman's 48th edition manual but it was shrink wrapped in plastic so I couldn't see what was in it.
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