45 LC

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by American Leader, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. American Leader

    American Leader Well-Known Member

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    I want to pick your brains regarding bullet diameters for the 45 LC. I noticed that the loading data varies with different manuals and supplier information in regard to bullet diameters. I have seen 45LC call for .452 for lead and .454 for jacketed in one manual, .454 for both lead & jacketed in another and .456 in a different addition. When you go to purchase bullets most offerings are for .451 or .452 diameters. I have been loading a long time, but missed reading about this differential I guess or just too old to remember. So, common guy's and give me a refresher course. Thanks, AL
  2. todd51

    todd51 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    AL I am sure not expert in the .45 Colt but I think what you are running into is an age thing. The old black powder Colts had a groove diameter of .454 but later on in the mid 50's I think they changed the groove diameter to .451. I have read where cylinder throats very even on the newer guns so measurements should be taken to be sure what you gun has. I "think" all the modern .45 Colts are using the .451 groove diameter but let me say again I am no expert.
  3. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Thats correct Todd. All modern .45Colt chamberings use a .451 bore so will use .451 jackets and .452 lead.

    Where the .454, .456, .457 came about was throat and bore measurements mostly from old colt SAAs. Back in the day these revolvers were as signature unique as your own fingerprint in the bore/throat diameter combinations they could have. I have seen examples with .457 throats and .452 bores, in that case youd want a lead bullet of the fatter size to shoot accurately. I have also seen rarer examples of tight throats and loose bores, one in particular was a gen 2 SAA that for some odd reason had .452 throats and a .454 bore. those almost never shoot well.

    I had my run ins with almost all of these examples because the owners would bring me their guns to be cleaned because the bore was smeared with lead so badly you couldnt see the rifling.

    The issua isnt just an issue with older colts, but also copies of foreign make. It seems some foreign firms have their own idea of what the measurements should be.

    Every Ruger I have toyed with, whether it be a Vaquero ro Blackhawk in .45Colt, has had .452 throats and .451 bores. These are great shooters with cheap commercial cast bullets.
  4. American Leader

    American Leader Well-Known Member

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    Thanks you two, it appears new revolvers are .451, but I'll check the particular revolver involved to verify. It explains to me why suppliers are offering primarily .451 & .452 currently. And as far as Todd being an expert, as old as you are Todd you have to be an expert in something, so lets go with the firearms field, I don't want my mind to go wondering!:eek::D However, it still doesn't totally explain why the various loading manuals handle this the way they do. Reloaders literally put their lives in the suppliers hands. Take care boys and Merry Christmas!
  5. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Meryy christmas back at ya AL.
  6. LDJ

    LDJ Member

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    The .451 or .452 thing confused me again. I thought I had it figured out and I have been loading the Hornady HP XTP in 250 Gr., .452. After reading this post I called Hornady and they said that is right. .451 is for ACP and .452 is for 45LC.

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