A question on cleaning & then a particular piece (Llama .380)

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by XabuJr, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. XabuJr

    XabuJr New Member

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    Jan 20, 2007
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    Ok, so I just got this gun from my dad:

    [​IMG]

    It's a Llama .380 auto. Can't seem to find much on these older ones, as it appears Llama has shut down.

    Where can I get a manual for this gun or a cleaning guide? I've always just shot, not had to clean, maintain, etc. So I don't wanna mess this gun up.

    The other ? is going to make me sound like an idiot, but I don't care, I'd rather be an informed idiot than never know.

    The circled piece.... what does it do? I watch what it does when I try to use the switch but it doesn't really do anything.. :confused:

    [​IMG]

    Thanks guys!
  2. Ursus

    Ursus New Member

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    Wellcome XabuJr!! That piece is a thumb safety. It's pourpose is to prevent the hammer to fall at pulling the trigger. Of course, the hammer must be fully cocked. (That is hammer is totally pulled back).This is what is known as a cocked(Hammer back) and locked (safety on/upwards) carry.
    Let me check about your other question...altough I think dissasembly is not that different from a 1911's.
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2007
  3. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    Hi XabuJr......welcome to TFF. :)

    Looks like a Llama Model IIIA.....and I've got one just like it. Basically, it's a 2/3 scale copy of the Colt M1911A1.....and it field strips and disassembles just like the Colt. The only difference between the Llama IIIA and the Colt is that the Colt has an external extractor and the Llama has an internal one. This won't bother you for normal field stripping for cleaning.

    For cleaning, you need only go to step 9: http://www.marstar.ca/AssemblyColt1911.htm

    Here's another disassembly/assembly guide: http://www.m1911.org/full_striping.htm

    OK.....now the circled part in your photo is the Manual (or thumb) Safety.
    With the hammer cocked and the safety in the UP position, it blocks the hammer from falling.

    The Colt M1911 is what's known as a single-action auto pistol.....which means that the hammer must be cocked in order for it to fire. The thumb safety keeps the gun from firing when the the hammer is cocked and ready for firing.
  4. Ursus

    Ursus New Member

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  5. Xabu, welcome to TFF! There is no such thing as a dumb question if you don't know the answer to it. The only "dumb" people are the ones who don't ask questions when they don't know.

    The others here have the right of it. The part you circled is, of course, the thumb safety for the weapon. It won't engage unless the hammer is fully cocked. When the weapon is carried with the hammer cocked, a round in the chamber, and the thumb safety engaged it is in what we call "Condition One," i.e., to fire all that is needed is for the thumb safety to be disengaged by your thumb while the butt safety is pressed down by your grip on the pistol butt. Pressing the trigger will then dicharge the weapon. "Condition Two" is similar except that the hammer is carried in the down position with a live round in the chamber and a full magazine is in place, thus the hammer must be pulled completely back to the cocked position by the thumb in order to discharge the weapon. In Condition Two, the thumb safety is, of course, not engaged at all. You effectively have simple single action operation, not unlike what occurrs in a single-action revolver. The only danger with Condition Two is that it is conceivable that the weapon could accidentally discharge if dropped directly on the hammer from a height of several feet. It's not likely, but it can happen. Condition Three is when the weapon is carried with a full magazine, hammer down, but NO round in the chamber. To fire, it is necessary first actually to cock the slide to put a round in the chamber, which normally takes two hands. This is the safest way to carry a single action auto, and the manner offically specified in the military, not that most of us carried it that way. ;)

    I too have a Llama IIIA and I can confirm it breaks down and reassembles virtually identically to a 1911 pattern .45 pistol.
  6. XabuJr

    XabuJr New Member

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    Sweet, you guys are awesome! I figured it was a safety of sorts, but hadn't messed with it that much. I know the basics of gun safety and know how to make sure it's empty and everything. But to actually own and carry is quite new.

    Thanks for all the info!!
  7. 22WRF

    22WRF Well-Known Member

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    One more thing.
    The IIIA has a loaded chamber indicator.
    You will see it just in front of the rear sight.
    Just a little flat metal strip that raises up when a round is in the chamber.
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