Accidental Discharges

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by 45nut, Nov 14, 2007.

  1. 45nut

    45nut Active Member

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    My question is; how common are they and is it the "familiarity that breeds contempt", momentarily forgetting the 10 Commandments, or a large dose of dumda$$? :D

    I knew a police officer who said, the more you handle firearms the more your chances increase that you will pop an unintentional cap. :eek:

    What say you? I'm not looking for confessions here, just wondering if anyone you know has done it or any theories for the occurrence.
  2. Nighthawk

    Nighthawk New Member

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    I disagree the accidents I've had was with firearm I was unfamiliar with. Trigger much lighter than I was used to. I have seen some close calls. Accidental discharges are die to either momentary stupidity or total stupidity.

    I think for most people the more familiar you are with firearm the less likely for accident, but there are some that shouldn't be allowed to come close to firearms.
    I just remembered I have had one true accidental discharge with an old drop block 22. when I raise block up hammer dropped and fired. Was aiming down range. So for, all I've had (and hope no more) were aimed in proper direction.
  3. Gabob

    Gabob Well-Known Member

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    There are two kinds of shooters: Those who have had an AD and those who will.
    I had a .22 K Hornet fire when I closed the bolt a couple of years ago but luckily the rifle was pointed in the vicinity of a prairie dog.
    Saw an M1 Garand fire while on a sandbag rest with no one holding it( It was a hangfire)

    Just keep those muzzles pointed in a safe direction at all times
  4. AngelDeville

    AngelDeville New Member

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    I disagree, every time I pick up my 1911, I clear it, even if I just did it 2 minutes before...

    Although just this Monday at the range (Thanks Veterans for the day off),
    I picked up a friends Para 1911 for the first time, and as I was bringing the pistol up to target a touch of the trigger fired it.
  5. Crpdeth

    Crpdeth Active Member

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    Well, yeah... I mean if you pick up a gun one time in your life and put it down, swearing to never touch them again, well...Your chances are slim to none that you will ever have an AD.

    Wholeheartedly disagree! I've been messing with guns all my life and have never had a AD, furthermore, I know many more who haven't...In fact I'd side with anyone saying that those people who have had one are in the minority.

    I don't consider myself a "safety nut", but I refuse to be careless...It's not just my life were talking about if it goes off without warning.

    Crpdeth
  6. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Depends on Uncle Sam's whim every 3 yrs.
    I have seen countless negligent discharges from recruits...sometimes several daily...those are usually due to very poor weapon handling (i.e. fingers on triggers when they shouldn't be). Normally happens under stress...the cure is lots of training so that motor muscle memory is working when the conscious thought is hindered by too much sensory overload. In other words...if you are not redundantly trained in weapon handling you probably will have AD/ND's in a bad situation. The only way to prepare for such things is to do it...under stress...a lot...talking/reading about it is useless.

    Then there is complacency. Sometimes too much familiarity with a weapon causes motor muscle memory to engage before the person stops to think. (I once watched 3 officers in a row!!! fire their weapons accidentaly into clearing barrels because they were soooo used to clearing unloaded M16's, that when they were loaded they forgot to drop the magazines before they inspected the chambers....ofcourse when they released the bolts, they loaded a round, so when they pulled the trigger....)

    Weapon skills are perishable skills. Mechanical safeties are prone to fail (I have recently seen an M16 that fired when the selector was totated into Safe)

    The only way to avoid AD/ND's with some certainty is constant, good practice.
  7. Gabob

    Gabob Well-Known Member

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    I consider myself a safety nut but I have had several over a period of sixty years, Two were with 1911 autos. One broke a sear spring and discharged the other was a brand new Gold Cup with a defectively ground sear that went full auto. I mentioned the hangfire in Garand and the Hornet that fired when bolt was closed. Also had a quail hunting buddy have a 12 gauge fire when he bumped the stock. In all the cases the muzzles were pointed downrange or away from anyone . All of these happened to experienced, safe shooters two of whom shot on military teams. I just think if you shoot enough it WILL happen to the safest of us.
    If you have never had an AD then be extra careful because it CAN happen thru weapon malfunction or some cause beyond your control
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2007
  8. 358 winchester

    358 winchester *TFF Admin Staff*

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    AD's can happen to any one! firearms are machines and machines break or malfunction at times. The danger lies in how careless the person using the machine is. If the barrel is pointed "down range" then we are safer then if it is pointed at our shooting partner. If I don't look when approaching the intersection and some drivers breaks fail then I can't avoid the accident either. AD's happen just be safe at all times
  9. An excellent point, Ron. Neither machines nor humans are ever fail-safe. When I teach others to shoot, the most important and simplest rule I teach, drummed in over and over, and over again until they get sick of hearing it, is . . . "never let the bore of your weapon, at any time, pass over anything that would be harmed by shooting it unless it is your intention to shoot it." If that simple rule is followed, even an AD will cause nothing but possibly some embarrassment for the shooter. Embarrassment is easily survivable and a learning experience; a bullet in someone's head usually is not!
  10. Crpdeth

    Crpdeth Active Member

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    Well, after re-reading my post I sounded a little rough, I'll say one thing, you got 25 years on me so I have plenty of time to eat my words, and after a little thought, your AD experiences were all but unavoidable... One could be as much of a safety fiend as he likes and never stop an AD due to a broken seer spring.

    All said, I know enough guys who hunt/shoot regularly, who have never had an accident, that their years would total those of Methuselah, so I have good hope that I never will either.

    I saw one though...Geeze man, it's a good thing we are safety conscious on the skeet field, this new guy shows up and he is cool as he can be really, just an old country boy, a real "bubbly" guy who talked and laughed a lot, with his shells stuffed into his jeans pockets. :D

    Anyway, I think it's a little bit like Delta was saying, he was under just a tiny bit of pressure because he had never shot "real skeet" before, complete with a range officer and all those rules... All those rules are the only reason his barrel was pointed away from us when he planted a 1oz load in the dirt, right in front of his feet while he was getting into position to call for a bird.

    Talk about everyone getting quiet for a minute or so...:rolleyes:


    Crpdeth
  11. Indian Creek 1

    Indian Creek 1 Member

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    I've had an SKS go slamfire full auto on me but it was pointed down range. Then again My wife has an uncle whom when he picks up a gun (any kind ) everyone starts ducking behind anything they can for protection. Needless to say I won't hunt with him. I want to try to live another 72 years.:eek::D:D:D:D

    A.J.
  12. LurpyGeek

    LurpyGeek Active Member

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    I borrowed my brothers SKS and went shooting on a family outing this past summer. Most there were inexperienced as far as firearms go, and some had never shot. I actually probably only shot three rounds myself, but was mostly the coach / loader / rangemaster the rest of the time, and had a blast doing it.

    I had heard of the rare tendency of the SKS to stick a firing pin and slamfire full auto. This concerned me mostly because there would be people shooting who weren't accustomed to recoil of any kind. I didn't want the weapon to get away from them if this were to happen, so inexperienced shooters only got two rounds in the magazine.

    Luckily we were all safe and had a great time. Most people say the SKS will function no matter how gunked up it is, but I do my best to keep it as clean as I can anytime I'm going to be shooting it.

    I have had one negligent dischage (not accidental, just stupid), but it was only a .22 LR and was pointed down range. I was pretty unhappy with myself for the rest of the day though.
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2007
  13. Bruce FLinch

    Bruce FLinch New Member

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    When I teach our Action Pistol Orientation, I tell the Students "there are 2 kinds of Shooters, those that will DQ & those that have. Only seen one AD & that was an "experienced" loud mouth expert.

    At the local Home Depot today, I saw a sign someone had copied & hung up.
    " Machine is not equipped with a Brain. Please use your own" :) I liked that sign!
  14. Tom Militano

    Tom Militano New Member

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    I shot with a lot of Army teams, I'm 66 and have been using firearms since I was 12 years old and have never had a AD. Call it luck if you want or just being extra careful, but I intend to do my best to keep the streak intact.
  15. Crpdeth

    Crpdeth Active Member

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    Nope Tom, I think, like I said, you are in the majority of firearm owners.

    Now..

    I know we've all seen this, but while were on the subject...We've GOT to see this again! I'm the only one in this room PROFESSIONAL enough...

    LOL, it's not funny, but to be a braggart then shoot yourself and have it posted for thousands of ppl to see...Thats funny.


    Crpdeth
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