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ADvice for a Rookie?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by egozi, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. egozi

    egozi New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
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    Wusup yall,

    I'm new to this gun thing but for some reason they seem to fascinate me...

    Any advice on what i should get for my first?
    I was thinking for some reason a Glock g17 9mm would be nice, but theres so many different options with .45's and all that that i know NOTHING about...

    I Definitly want a semi-auto pistol...

    Any advice yall can give??

    Mainly house protection is what im looking for.
    I was looking for lightweight and pretty easy to fire, so i heard the glocks are pretty light and the recoil is not so bad?

    I would be using it to take the range every once in a while and stuff but mostly house protection...

    Finances is a big thing too... i don't want to spend too much.

    Also, do any of yall by any chance know of a website or forum thats got a good little introductory reading on the basics... differences between calibers, ammo, barrel size, all that stuff? i've been looking for a good (free) resource to gain some basic knowledge and havn't found one yet.

    Thanks,
    Ego
  2. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    For your situation, I would recomend a basic Springfield 1911. It will be heavier than a glock(I'm assuming here), but the field stripping process is very easy, fires easily, and is safer than a glock(my reason for saying this is it actually has a safety. Both a grip safety and thumb safety.). A .45 will give you better stopping power. The Springfield will also be on the more inexpensive side and still give you a quality weapon. Go to a gun store and hold one and see how it feels. I think you'll like it. Look on the NRA website to see if they have the inof you are looking for.
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2006
  3. rosierita

    rosierita Active Member

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    :) welcome to the board egozi!

    before buying anything, go to a local range & rent a gun to shoot. :) since you are new to it, i'd also recommend you start w/ a 22, 25 or 32. (no recoil!) recoil is relative. what i call recoil may not bother you & what i consider to be no recoil, you may find to be too much.... make sense? start w/ something that you know there is virtually no recoil at all & build yourself up. practice proper handling, stance, etc w/ 1 of those smaller calibers (& find out how much you're gonna flinch when firing). also, shooting a 22 is MUCH cheaper than shooting a 38 or a 357 or a 40 or a 45... (see where this is going?? you'll most likely end up w/ more than 1 gun :p :D .) good luck & HAVE FUN!! there is probably someone else here more qualified to answer all your questions.... bt us all tho, i'm sure you can get them all answered!

    again, WELCOME TO THE BOARD!! :D
  4. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    rosierita is right about starting with a small caliber first. If you haven't shot much this would be a very good idea. Shooting a gun before you buy is also a good idea.

    Oh yeah, Welcome to the board and welcome to the obsession.
  5. egozi

    egozi New Member

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    Thanks for the help guys, im gonna definitly head out to a range soon..

    Smaller caliber meaning what... i know a .45 is pretty strong and stuff, is a glock g17 smaller caliber?
  6. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    A .22 caliber would be best. You could also use a .25 or .32 as rosierita suggested. A 9mm would be a medium caliber in my mind. The less recoil you have to deal with while you are learning the better. Once you have learned how to shoot a gun properly and have the mechanics down you can move to larger calibers. By using the smaller calibers with less recoil you can avoid developing bad habits such as flinching and your shooting will more than likely be better.
  7. user_error

    user_error New Member

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    9mm are great learners. The reason I started with a 9 are because the bullets are so cheap, but the gun isn't so underpowered that it's of little use for defense. The nice middle ground in terms of recoil lets you learn what it feels like for a gun to jump and get used to the flinch factor, but not crack your hand like those beginner-punishing .44 mags and .45s. Not that you can't move up to a .45 when you have some experience--the stopping power is definitely a plus, and colts are damn good guns.
  8. Bruce FLinch

    Bruce FLinch New Member

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    Anything that goes BANG , is going to scare off 99% of the burglars, that may visit you. Somebody said " A 22 in the tearduct , is more persuasive than a 9mm in the ass" ( maybe Jeff Cooper? ) Welcome to our Mania! :)
  9. Welcome to the Firearms Forum, egozi!

    As a starting place, egozi, and because you want the pistol that will ultimately do for home protection as well, I would definitely suggest a good 9mm auto. There are many good ones out there, Glock, Sig Sauer, Steyr, CZ, and many others. The 9mm is a relatively easy pistol to learn to shoot, ammo is relatively inexpensive, and stopping power is sufficient if not spectacular. Best advice: by the best quality pistol you can afford. Save money on things that don't matter as much, like food. :D
  10. Marlin T

    Marlin T Active Member

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    If you are looking to use this weapon just for a home protection device, get a shotgun with a short barrel. They are safer than a pistol.

    Just my 2 cents worth.
  11. Carl S

    Carl S New Member

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    Welcome to the forum, egozi, and to the wonderful world of firearms.

    I endorse what Marlint said about a shotgun for home defense with a handgun for backup. Like the others have said, start shooting small caliber handguns first then graduate to bigger calibers.
  12. rosierita

    rosierita Active Member

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    ITA w/ the shotgun as the best defense!

    when i started shooting it was w/ a 22 rifle. if you are going to rent 1st, start w/ a 22 then move up from there. (& more than likely you'll do that in 1 day.)

    i took a friend w/ me to the range a few months ago & she had never held a loaded gun before in her life. i dont own a 22 pistol, so i handed her my 32 revolver (which has no recoil, of course that has alot to do w/ the make & weight of the gun) & she shot probably 40 rounds of it & then she graduated to our 9 mm, then to our 357 where she shot 38s. she also shot our 32 auto keltec (which has considerable recoil bc it's small & lightweight). this was all in 1 night & she has her trophy target to this day. :D she did VERY WELL & today owns her own 32 revolver. :) (this was my treat & that girl cost me that night! :p :D )

    do you have a friend that is knowledgeable w/ guns?? or a family member that can go w/ you??
  13. sarzak

    sarzak New Member

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    i like glocks for self defense purposes. not a lot of thingamajigs sticking out to train on just pull trigger of course shotgun way better all the oldtimers on this site will say 1911 or some other steel gun but i think they just did a lot of pistol whippin back in the old days
  14. henry0reilly

    henry0reilly Member

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    Definitely get 20 ga pump for the house.

    Your first handgun should be a .22 single action revolver, for sure. .22 because it's inexpensive to practice with, single action revolver because it will spare you the temptation to empty the gun rapidly.

    Ruger Super Single Six with an extra cylinder in 22 mag is a good investment. You can find a used one for around $225 or less if you find a bargain.

    Practice practice practice. Then after a few thousand rounds, you're ready to move up to a .357 revolver.
  15. henry0reilly

    henry0reilly Member

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    I just noticed that your subject line is "ADvice for a Rookie?"

    lol AD = Accidental Discharge which is an incorrect term for Negligent Discharge.
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