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AMMO QUESTION

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by BETH, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    Can someone tell me exactly what it means when it says 40gr compared to a grain that is less.
  2. gary0529

    gary0529 Member

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    Please refine the question.
    Have absolutely no idea of what is being sought.
  3. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    i am a new shooter and looking at ammo i see there is a 40gr and maybe a 36 gr bullet now does that mean the 40gr is heavier and will go farther? i don't know what it means with the different gr and why u would use a lighter gr bullet compared to a heavier gr bullet?
  4. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Active Member

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    I think i follow your question; my understanding would be this :

    Why is there 10-12 different bullet weights for a .223 bullet between 40gr and 90gr? for a .45, you've got the 155,180,185,200 and 230grs..........

    It all depends upon your particular firearm and your intent. Depending on lenght of barrel and rate of twist ( very important with different bullet wts ), the results you can get with bullets of even slight weight differences are very spread out. Also with intent, for plinking .45's, I prefer 185gr flat nosed Rainiers, I can load them up with Clays and shoot acurately and cheaply; with less recoil. For practice, I'll shoot my carry loads, 230gr XTP's.

    Hope this answers your question alright.
  5. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

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    My guess is you are referring to .22 rimfire ammo. Heavier grain bullets generally are more stable and accurate and slower, extra mass generally makes more damage (hunting senario) on game. 36 grain ammo may have a higher velocity and sometimes is cheaper. Distance each travels will be about the same.
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2009
  6. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    Ok now i get it-i am getting a p22lr if my permit ever gets here (waiting 6 weeks now) sorry i did not explain myself better. they are telling me not to use hollow point and to use heavy high velocity like cci min mags & stingers 40gr or remington golden bullets but i did not understand what the grain weight had to do with it? thanks so much for answering
  7. Crpdeth

    Crpdeth Active Member

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    You are doing fine... We all started somewhere. ;)


    Crpdeth
  8. zb338

    zb338 New Member

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    Beth,

    There are 7000 grains to a pound. Don't confuse grains with grams.
    Zeke
  9. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Active Member

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    The use of high velocity ammo is to ensure proper function due to it's blowback design. I hope you have good luck with the pistol and enjoy it!
  10. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    I think bullets have grains and food has grams??????????????????
  11. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    Beth, we got my wife one of the pink digital camo P22's about a year ago for some cost effective fun at the range. She really likes it a lot. CCI Mini-Mags in hollow points will work fine in it, but they are costly and hard to find. Federal 550 Bulk pack from Walmart shoots the best for practice. Her gun didn't like the Remington Golden Bullets. Lots of failure to fire (FTF) and failure to eject (FTE) with them.

    P.S.: Grains are a measure of weight that we use in ammunition & reloading to measure the size of our bullets along with the caliber, powder charges and other items. I think the term "grains" originally goes back to the black powder days.

    In some cases the added velocity and thus energy that you get from a lighter bullet can be beneficial.
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2009
  12. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    There are many different weight scales in use in the world.

    Europe uses metric. Grams and milligrams and kilograms.

    We use avoirdupois. Pounds and ounces. Not to be confused with troy pounds and ounces (which gold is weighed in), which is totally different.

    A grain is, pretty much, as small you are really going to weight something. 7000 grains to the pound, which makes 437 1/2 grains to the ounce, vs. 28-and-a-piece grams to the ounce.

    Bullets and powder are weighed in grains.

    In 22LR ammo, you normally have 40-grain solids and 36-grain hollowpoints. There are a couple of types that are outside the norm. Stingers are smaller. 32-grain hollowpoint. Colibri and Super Colibri are 20 grain. SSS uses a 60-grain bullet. But usually your choices are 40 and 36.

    The hollowpoints are the same size as the solids, but because of the hollow, they weigh less. The slightly lighter weight allows them to be driven faster, out of a rifle, which in turn helps the bullet to expand. In a pistol you will not get them fast enough, so they will act as a solid if you shoot someone. Add to that the fact that a hollowpoint has a better chance of not feeding correctly, and using the solids makes much more sense, from a defensive standpoint.

    I, personally, if I was gonna use a 22 auto for self defense, would load it with CCI Mini Mags, 40 grain solids. Since, as I said, you won’t go fast enough for expansion, then you might as well get the (however slight) benefit of the heavier bullet, the solid feeds better, and the copper washed bullet does not pick up trash like the wax-coated lead bullets do.
  13. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    See here i go again "copper washed and wax coated" now i have to look into that????? They said for the p22 not to use hollow point so i am not. I am a little nervous about going shooting about "misfires" and that stuff but i am going with my friend who knows guys so hopefully if i do get a misfire it will happen when he is there. I only have about 3 weeks to go shooting as he is moving to Fla then i have to find someone else i can go with. Thanks for the info
  14. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    When you push a lead bullet down a steel barrel, minute pieces of lead are left in the barrel. This is called "leading", and you will see reference to it often, if you read about guns and shooting. The faster you push the bullet, the more lead is left. The softer the lead is, the more lead is left. Bullet makers use different ways to prevent lead build-up.

    There are, basically, four types of bullets.

    Jacketed. Lead core with a copper, brass or gilding metal jacket around it. Purpose is to prevent lead build-up in your barrel. It allows you to push the bullet at great speed (the 220 Swift goes over 4000 feet per second) without depositing lead.

    Plated. This is a relatively new thing. Lead bullet is electroplated with copper. It looks like a jacketed bullet, but the copper is nowhere near as thick as a jacket. It helps to prevent leading in your barrel.

    Lubricated lead. A bullet lube, using some type of wax, is applied to a lead bullet. As the bullet goes down the barrel, the lube helps to prevent lead from sticking.

    Copper-washed. This is only used in 22 rimfire. It, like the plated bullets, looks like it is jacketed, but the coating is even thinner than the plated. The purpose is the same, though. Prevent leading.

    22 rimfire bullets are either gray (lead with a wax lube), orange (copper washed) or yellow (Remington "Golden Bullet", which is also copper washed, just a different color).
  15. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Oh, and Beth, keep doing what you're doing. If you don't know something, ask. If you don't understand the answer, ask again. We'll get you edumacated. :D
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