An archery question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by McFry, Jul 12, 2008.

  1. McFry

    McFry New Member

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    In addition to my firearm interests, I am also an avid compound bow shooter. I was at the sporting goods store today where they have an indoor archery range and I test fired both a traditional bow and a recurve bow. They were both alot of fun to shoot and I am interested in buying one of these primative weapons. I also learned that the choice of arrow, fletching, and broadhead are different when choosing to shoot a non-compound bow. What is the difference (really) between a traditional and recurve design?
  2. durk

    durk New Member

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    Some would say that a recurve bow would be more sporting as there is no let-off when fully drawn back. Less draw weight would cause you to change your aiming as you would have to aim higher to be on target.
  3. nightfighter

    nightfighter New Member

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    You have to be more specific...what do you mean by "traditional"? Do you mean an English long bow verses a recurve? Or, do you mean compound bow when you say "traditional".
    Or, do you mean a "self" bow as being traditional?

    A compound bow generally uses vanes instead of fletching (split feathers).
    A compound bow generally uses carbon fiber shafts or aluminum shafts.
    A compound bow must use shafts of sufficient (spine) strength to resist breaking from excess flexing during release which usually means no wooden shafts.
    A self bow, unlike a recurve ( which uses layers of fiberglass and wood), uses only a single piece of wood for the limbs.
    An English long bow is a bow intended for primitive warfare and is a unusually long, self bow (a single piece of wood). Early long bows shot arrows with a distinctive wide iron point known as a broadhead. Later English long bow arrows shot arrows with a narrow "bodkin" point intended to pierce early armor.
    Surprisingly, the recurve bow dates back to the raiding hordes of Mongols, and used horn and wood bonded with glue all bent in the distinctive shape to make recurve bows.
    You can use vanes, carbon fiber and or aluminum shafts for arrows in modern recurve bows.
    Long bow shooters however, prefer to stay traditional with wooden shafts, and feather fletching instead of plastic vanes.
    English long bows gave way to cross bows which shot a short arrow called a "bolt" or a "quarrel".
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2008
  4. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    I think most bowhunters would agree the recurve is superior to a traditional bow. Especially if laminated or composite also.

    The main difference in shooting your compound bow from traditional bows is your compound has relief at the end of the draw, while simple bows "stack" energy in the limbs. The "let off" or "relief" in the compound bow is from the mechanical advantage of the cable and cam/cams.

    Simple bows don't have a mechanical advantage. Now, I said all that to say this to answer your question...a recurve stacks more energy in the limbs for the same amount of effort used by the archer, thus the advantage in using a recurve over a traditional curve bow.
  5. McFry

    McFry New Member

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    So, Delta, what you are saying is a recurve is more powerful than a traditional curve design, based on relative draw weight? So why would anyone want a traditonal curve bow? You should also know that both the straight curve and recurve bows I shot were made from laminated fibreglass and wood. Nightfigher, refer to my last sentence and know that when I say "traditional" I mean a straight bow made from laminated wood and fibreglass.
  6. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Why, oh why, would anyone want one of them old-fashioned weapons when there are many more powerful ones out there from which to choose? Because some of us just like shooting black powder. :p :D

    Pops
  7. McFry

    McFry New Member

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    Very true
  8. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Yeah, man, Armedandsafe said the sum of it on why would anyone want a traditonal curve bow.

    My mother's father had worked for a guy named Ben Pearson in between his careers after WW2 until he finally retired. Ben and my grandfather were both from the Saline River bottom in Arkansas. I was born too late to ever meet Ben Pearson, but as a school kid I had original bows from his company hanging on my wall to hunt haystacks with.

    Around the beginning of high school I'd began doing lots of things to make rifle hunting harder, like stalking a specific buck to under 50 yards in his afternoon bed, which made me question my choice of rifles. I'd gone full circle, from 30-30 in regrown timber slash as a kid to .270 and 30-06 long range in power-line/firebreaks and across cotton fields as a preteen , back to hunting in thickets, because stalking close is a challenge. A Hawkins muzzleloader was the next step. I skipped handguns because I'd been shooting them in competition since age 13.

    Hunting with a bow was hard as hell. Harder than I thought it would be and I had a bunch of failures. But I had plenty of mentors to learn from and I had some successful new strategies by the time I could legally drive. I was not very good, but I was getting better. And I guess it was natural to begin to want to have a kill with a simple traditional bow. And back to square one.

    Anytime I see someone with a traditional bow or buying stuff for one, I figure I know how he got to that point.
  9. obxned

    obxned New Member

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    When I first started with a bow, a recurve was absolute state of the art. After years of no contact with bows, I again became interested, only to discover that a bow was now a bizarre contraption with wheels and cables and stuff like that all over it, and a plain old recurve was now a mega-bucks specialty item.

    I have since learned that compound bows are pretty darn nice. I have one that I hunt with when time permits, but have not killed a deer with it yet. However, recurves are now gianing in popularity, and quite nice ones are not priced out of reason. I might have to spring for one one of these days.
  10. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Ben Pearson's legacy takes the credit for changing archery in America....sort of like the Ford of bows.
  11. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    McFry:

    If you buy any compound bow buy a good one. A local college teacher here lost his life when his compound bow broke during achery practice and imbedded a large piece into his brain via his eye socket. I have no idea of what brand or anymore details but good judgement tells me to buy a GOOD compound bow, not one made by a fool.

    LDBennett
  12. Lead Lobber

    Lead Lobber Former Guest

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    I must toss in a final nugget, as I saw no mention of arrow performance above.

    Having owned only one bow as young boy, I (and my brother) were fond (stupid?) of shooting arrows in the air, then skipping from their downward trajectory, which stuck them in verdant grass on our expansive lawn bordering a bay off Puget Sound.

    But I digress. Digest? See the bone spinning in 2001: A Space Oddessy?

    Many years later I read an article in Scientific American that addressed the flight mechanics of arrows.

    To make a short story longer, I learned that an arrow, upon leaving a bow is not stable; it wiggles along it's longitudinal axis until it settles into efficient flight.

    This means, in short, an arrow shot at short range does not have the penetration of one zeroing in from longer range, because the short range trajectory wobbles, until the feathers sooth it into straight flight.

    I guess I have gotten off on another topic. Flight dynamics. Oh, well.

    The only beneficial thing here is for bow hunters: Don't try for game at close range; let the arrow strike on its downward arc. Yes, more accuracy is required, so plan for it.

    But with Zombies, it really doesn't matter!
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