Anchor and Flower Marking

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by ff_emtdehaan, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. ff_emtdehaan

    ff_emtdehaan New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    The Japanese aspect on the rifle is very possible as there is a large Japanese sub culture out here in my part of South Jersey. The area was very popular during the war for refugee camps. Caliber I have no clue on. Would it be advisable to take a wire brush to it in different area's to look for markings or to just leave them as is, and what all areas would be good to check.

    Again thank you very much for all your help with these weapons.
  2. whirley

    whirley Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    546
    Tractor Supply Co. has an excellent rust remover in gallon jugs. Don't recall the name. Requires immersion of part, way better than naval jelly.. Excellent on tools, should work on all iron parts.
  3. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2001
    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Indiana
    I was also wondering how you managed to stumble on these while digging around. Does it look like somebody just discarded them? Or was "stashing" or hiding them?

    Maybe "Survivalists-when-Survivalism-wasn't-cool?":p

    I mean I have stumbled on old forgotten rusty "barn" or "attic" rifles before but usually only onesies, I was wondering what would make somebody bury or discard what essentially looks like a "typical" accumulation of "basic" guns just about any non-gun nut or hunter would have acquired over time....I mean what is more basic than a cheap but utilitarian .22, a cheap but utilitarian shotgun, and "Gramp's bring back from the war?"
  4. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2001
    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Indiana
    Maybe Hubby dies, no kids, widow doesn't want guns around the house so she throws them out?

    Maybe they were stolen from somewhere in the neighborhood way back when and when the heat was on the perp ditched them?

    I mean the possibilities are endless, and I am intrigued....:p

    I wouldn't be surprised if you kept digging around if you might not find the bolt from the Arisaka, and maybe even Uncle Joe's old nickle plated Iver Johnson .32 revolver back there!:p:D
  5. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,397
    How did we go from three rusty guns, one not even real, to some kind of Japanese sub-culture stashing secret arms caches in South Jersey? Maybe a plot to assist the Imperial Japanese Army when they stormed ashore on the Atlantic City boardwalk? Come now, guys, speculation is fun, but ....

    Jim
  6. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,740
    Location:
    Imperial, MO
    IIRC the rear tang was part of it but I'm going to take another look. Its been a while since its been out of its place. I am positive however it is a 38. I also have a 99 and it is completely different. Well not completely but obvious differences. Definably not metford rifling. Very obvious lands and grooves but straight, no helical at all. The metal is poor on the receiver, like a last resort, even part of it broke off and went MIA. No AA sights and the front sight is gone thanks to someone that wanted to sporterize it ie my dad when he was 20. Good thing he didn't ever use it.
  7. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,397
    As always, pictures will help. Type 38's were all made under what amounted to peacetime conditions and none have the rough work and finish of the late Type 99 rifles. They all have the normal serial numbers and arsenal markings, plus the normal receiver ring marks, the three horizontal lines for "3", the ") (" symbol for "8" and the "type" or "model" symbol, and the chrysanthemum if not ground. The top tang behind the receiver is always a separate part from the receiver itself.

    Training rifles vary. I have three training rifles, all different. One is a close copy of the Type 38, with a nice one-piece stock and good finish. But the bolt has no locking lugs at all, using the bolt root for its only lock. The other two have small locking lugs; one is a copy of the Type 38, the other is configured to look like a Type 99.

    On all training rifles I have seen, the rear top tang is part of the receiver; on some training rifles the barrel boss (the thick part around the chamber) is also cast as part of the receiver, with a steel tube screwed into it to simulate a barrel.

    Jim

Share This Page