Annealing experiment.

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by GMFWoodchuck, May 19, 2009.

  1. GMFWoodchuck

    GMFWoodchuck New Member

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    I have often wondered how effective annealing is. So I figured that I will simply do an experiment. I will be using my 22-250 savage. My loads will the hodgon max of 34.1 grains of IMR 3031 with a fifty-five grain bullets. I figured this is a good load to test with, since it's still almost 2 grains shy of what speer considered a max load (36 grains) for this round. A full power load without attempting to test the limits of the gun. I have annealed 20 rounds of 5x fired remington brass. I will also reload 20 rounds of unannealled 5x fired brass. And I will repeat the annealing every 5x on the annealed brass. I will keep on shooting and see what happens. The method of annealing I am using is the one I have read off of Varmint Al's website. It seems like a good method.
  2. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Active Member

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    It's going to take a few days to read through the website, but definetly some good reading material and well written. +1 thanks for the lead on Varmint Al's
  3. flannelman

    flannelman New Member

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    Sounds like a good experiment to me. The annealed brass should last longer I would think.
  4. Suwannee Tim

    Suwannee Tim New Member

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    I have annealed quite a few 300 mag cases, having the necks split after two or three firings was dismaying to say the least. My method was simplicity itself, with a pan of water and a propane torch in a semi-dark room, hold the case near the head, rotating it in your fingers, put the neck and shoulder in the flame. When you get a nice uniform cherry red drop it in the water. If you are holding the head between your fingers there is no worry about annealing it. You want to do the job hot and fast. It will greatly reduce neck splits if the cases are new or nearly so. It will not heal incipient cracks.
  5. GMFWoodchuck

    GMFWoodchuck New Member

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    No splits yet. Course, I've only had time to shoot them once after annealling. :(

    Back to the reloading bench. I really do need to invest in a powder dispenser, by the way.
  6. GMFWoodchuck

    GMFWoodchuck New Member

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    Still going with it. A little slower than what I had intended. But no news after 9 shots of both groups. *yawn*
  7. Rocket J Squirl

    Rocket J Squirl New Member

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    Everytime you anneal, you put the case back to its new supple neck.

    its dumb not to. But not every reload. When you see them crystalize, its time to do the entire lot.
  8. Popgunner

    Popgunner New Member

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    I've tried that experiment & found that home annealed cases won't last as long as factory annealed cases. I used two LC military 30-06 cases with medium loads, neck sizing only with a lee-loader & a powder measure at the bench. No crimping.The home annealed case lasted 37 loads with 48 grns Imr-4895 before the neck split to the shoulder. The same loads lasted for 100 loadings in the factory annealed case & I quit without it failing. I trimmed every 20 loadings & the home annealed case didn't make it to the second trimming. I'm interested to see how you do with yours.
  9. GMFWoodchuck

    GMFWoodchuck New Member

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    I ran out of the IMR3031 powder so I will switch over to H4895 powder.......
  10. GMFWoodchuck

    GMFWoodchuck New Member

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    Trimmed every 20 loadings? Gee I have to do it more often than that....
  11. Popgunner

    Popgunner New Member

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    With full power loads you sure will have to trim more than every 20th load. Full power loads flow brass lots more than mid range loads. I wasn't checking length too closely as I wasn't crimping into the cannelure & I figured my loads to be more towards the mid-power range.

    Another thing I might mention is that I noticed while trying to get brass to really change form in a big way that my home annealed cases failed badly. I gave up annealing mostly when I had started using a 7mm TCU barrel on my contender for IHMSA shooting. The .223 cases I had annealed pretty much all broke/split collapsed while I was forming them up to 7mm. After trying several different ways to anneal I just don't do it anymore. I have found the factory annealing works best, & that tough brass is better than soft brass.

    Just my opinion of course & I don't think anyone could get hurt with mushy case mouths. I would warn against annealing down too low as mushy case bodies are an issue.
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009
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