Another Hero Gone.

Discussion in 'The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr' started by artabr, Dec 25, 2009.

  1. artabr

    artabr New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    7,859
    Location:
    New Iberia, Louisiana
    We have lost a true American hero.

    Col. Robert Lewis Howard passed away Wednesday.

    http://www.militarytimes.com/news/20...l_dies_122309/


    Decorated Army colonel, MoH recipient dies

    The Associated Press
    Posted : Thursday Dec 24, 2009 14:03:52 EST

    WACO, Texas — Retired Col. Robert Lewis Howard, a man considered to be the country’s most decorated soldier, died Wednesday. He was 70.

    Howard was battling pancreatic cancer and died about noon at a hospice, his friend Benito Guerrero, a Vietnam veteran and retired sergeant major, told the San Antonio Express-News.

    The Army veteran died in Waco, according to Oak Crest Funeral Home. At the time of his death he was the most decorated American soldier, the funeral home obituary said. He will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. No date has been set, the funeral home said.

    Howard grew up in Opelika, Ala., and served in the Army from 1956 to 1992. He was part of the U.S. Army Special Forces, known as the Green Berets, and ran cross-border operations in Laos, Cambodia and North Vietnam. He was wounded 14 times in Vietnam and was awarded eight Purple Hearts.

    He was nominated three times for the Medal of Honor, the nation’s most prestigious award for combat veterans. President Richard M. Nixon presented him with the honor at the White House in 1971 for his bravery in Vietnam during a mission to rescue a missing soldier in enemy territory.

    During that mission, the platoon was attacked. Howard tended to his wounded platoon leader while under fire and rallied platoon members into and organized defense force until rescue helicopters could land.

    “With complete disregard for his safety, 1st Lt. Howard crawled from position to position, administering first aid to the wounded, giving encouragement to the defenders and directing their fire on the encircling enemy. For 3½ hours 1st Lt. Howard’s small force and supporting aircraft successfully repulsed enemy attacks and finally were in sufficient control to permit the landing of rescue helicopters. 1st Lt. Howard personally supervised the loading of his men and did not leave the bullet-swept landing zone until all were aboard safely,” according to his Medal of Honor citation.

    His other two nominations were downgraded, one to the Distinguished Service Cross and the other to the Silver Star.

    At a gathering earlier this year for Medal of Honor recipients, Howard said he and others given the medal don’t wear their awards for themselves.

    “It is for all those who have and do wear the uniform of this great country of ours,” Howard told the crowd. “For those who stood beside us and for those who did not come home.”

    In April, Howard traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan to talk to troops. About two months ago he visited troops in Germany, Bosnia and Kosovo, the Express-News reported.

    “As one of America’s most decorated veterans, Col. Howard inspired everyone he met to consider their own commitment to our nation’s essential values, and was the bravest soldier I ever met,” Texas Gov. Rick Perry said in a statement. “His unshakeable commitment to freedom, displayed in countless episodes of battlefield gallantry, lives on in the actions of our military men and women who continue to serve in hostile conditions overseas.”

    Howard is survived by his children, Denicia Howard of Florida, Melissa Gentsch and her husband, Asst. Chief of Police Frank Gentsch of Waco, Rosslyn Howard of California and Robert Howard Jr.; and his wife, Tori of California; and his grandchildren, Victoria Batey and her husband, Luke of Denton, Holley Gentsch of Waco, Trey Howard of California and Isabella Gentsch of Waco.


    __________________________________________________ _________________


    http://militarytimes.com/citations-m...cipientid=2769


    Robert Lewis Howard


    Date of birth: 11 July 1939
    Place of birth: Opelika, Ala.
    Home of record: Montgomery, Ala.

    Robert Howard was nominated three times for the Medal of Honor, his first nomination being downgraded to the DSC. His second and third nominations wee simultaneous for two separate actions and the Medal of Honor was awarded for the first of them, the other was downgraded to the Silver Star. Wounded 14 times in 54 months of combat duty in Vietnam, Howard was awarded 8 Purple Hearts and is believed to be the most decorated living American


    Awards and Citations

    Medal of Honor

    Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Republic of Vietnam, on 30 December 1968. First Lieutenant Howard, distinguished himself while serving as platoon sergeant of an American-Vietnamese platoon which was on a mission to rescue a missing American soldier in enemy controlled territory. The platoon had left its helicopter landing zone and was moving out on its mission when it was attacked by an estimated two-company force. During the initial engagement, First Lieutenant Howard was wounded and his weapon destroyed by a grenade explosion. First Lieutenant Howard saw his platoon leader had been wounded seriously and was exposed to fire. Although unable to walk, and weaponless, First Lieutenant Howard unhesitatingly crawled through a hail of fire to retrieve his wounded leader. As First Lieutenant Howard was administering first aid and removing the officer's equipment, an enemy bullet struck one of the ammunition pouches on the lieutenant's belt, detonating several magazines of ammunition. First Lieutenant Howard momentarily sought cover and then realizing that he must rejoin the platoon, which had been disorganized by the enemy attack, he again began dragging the seriously wounded officer toward the platoon area. Through his outstanding example of indomitable courage and bravery, First Lieutenant Howard was able to rally the platoon into an organized defense force. With complete disregard for his safety, First Lieutenant Howard crawled from position to position, administering first aid to the wounded, giving encouragement to the defenders and directing their fire on the encircling enemy. For 3 1/2 hours First Lieutenant Howard's small force and supporting aircraft successfully repulsed enemy attacks and finally were in sufficient control to permit the landing of rescue helicopters. First Lieutenant Howard personally supervised the loading of his men and did not leave the bullet-swept landing zone until all were aboard safely. First Lieutenant Howard's gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his men at the risk of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army. Robert Lewis Howard

    Service: Army

    Rank: Sergeant First Class

    General Orders No. 16, March 24, 1971


    Silver Star

    Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Robert Lewis Howard (ASN: RA-14628152), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Howard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 12 to 20 November 1968, during an operation deep within enemy-held territory. As his platoon was being inserted into the area, it came under heavy fie from all directions. Sergeant Howard leaped from his helicopter before it touched down and began to return fire, providing protection for his men while they dismounted and moved safely off the landing zone. Seeing two enemy soldiers in a wood line, he charged their position and killed them both. When the unit was attacked by a company-size force on the night of 16 November, he went to each platoon member, encouraging them and directing their fire while completely exposing himself to the communist barrage. Two days later while Sergeant Howard was leading the point element, the platoon was ambushed by an estimated two North Vietnamese Army companies. He skillfully maneuvered his men so that the enemy was caught in a deadly crossfire and the ambush was broken. The following day, Sergeant Howard had again taken the point element when he observed an estimated battalion-size ambush. Although wounded in the initial exchange of fire, he exposed himself to the aggressors to place effective fire on them and enable his platoon to take cover. Moving from position to position, he administered first aid to the wounded and set up a landing zone so that they could be evacuated. As the first ambulance helicopter came in, it was struck by hostile machine gun fire and burst into flames. Sergeant Howard, although wounded a second time, ran one hundred and fifty meters to where the ship had crashed and rescued a trapped pilot from the blazing wreckage. Once the entire crew was free from the aircraft, he led them back to the platoon while providing covering fire. Three hours later another helicopter succeeded in landing and the casualties were evacuated, but Sergeant Howard refused to leave. The next morning, he saw three North Vietnamese soldiers maneuvering towards his element and immediately opened fire, killing them.

    Service: Army

    Rank: Sergeant First Class

    Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 371 (February 3, 1969)

    Distinguished Service Cross

    Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sergeant First Class Robert Lewis Howard (ASN: RA-14628152), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Howard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 November 1967, as Special Forces Advisor to a joint American and Vietnamese reconnaissance patrol conducting a search mission near the Laotian border. His patrol discovered a huge rice and ammunition cache surrounded by an enemy bunker complex. Sergeant Howard led a small team to provide security while the remainder of the unit began to destroy the stored supplies. His team encountered four North Vietnamese Army soldiers, and Sergeant Howard killed them with a fierce burst of rifle fire. He and his men were immediately pinned down by a murderous curtain of fire which erupted from a nearby enemy machine gun position. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Howard crawled toward the emplacement and killed a North Vietnamese sniper who was firing at him as he maneuvered. He then charged the bunker, eliminating its occupants with rifle fire. A second machine gun position unleashed a savage barrage. Sergeant Howard moved his troops to a covered location and directed an air strike against the fortified bunker. While assessing the bomb damage, Sergeant Howard was fired upon by North Vietnamese soldiers in the bunker who had survived the blasts. Pinned down directly outside the strongpoint with a blazing machine gun barrel only six inches above his head, he threw a hand grenade into the aperture of the emplacement, killing the gunners and temporarily silencing the weapon. He then dashed to his team's location and secured a light anti-tank weapon. As the enemy machine gun resumed firing, Sergeant Howard stood up amid a withering hail of bullets, fired his weapon, and completely demolished the position. His fearless and determined actions in close combat enabled the remainder of the patrol to destroy the enemy cache. Sergeant First Class Howard's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

    Service: Army

    Rank: Sergeant First Class

    Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2018 (May 2, 1968)

    __________________________________

    Rest In Peace, Colonel Howard

    We Are Diminished

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 25, 2009
  2. red14

    red14 Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    3,950
    Location:
    N FLA
    What a great warrior. I just don't have the words for my admiration.
  3. berto64

    berto64 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2001
    Messages:
    7,510
    Location:
    Owyhee County, Idaho
    Thanks for posting this Art.

    He will be missed.
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr Another Hero of the new age Jun 16, 2012
The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr another one bites the dust Aug 19, 2014
The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr Another vet dies Jul 4, 2014
The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr Another Global Warming Report ......... Jul 2, 2014
The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr Another 5 Killed, 19 Wounded in Chicago's Weekend Violence Jun 23, 2014

Share This Page