Antique British SUTHERLAND Percussion Pistol Question

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by laptopps, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    I think the bit about using a corncob was a joke.

    I don't know about today, but not too many years ago, the British Army toilet tissue was just that, like tissue paper used for wrapping, hard and shiny. And, so help me, it really did have the broad arrow printed on each sheet. I have no idea why; I couldn't imagine anyone wanting to steal that awful stuff - except me. I took a half dozen sheets to show folks how bad it was. (Now I guess they will send Scotland Yard after me!)

    Jim
  2. BullShoot

    BullShoot New Member

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    I don't think it was a joke. As I heard it, there were 2 buckets of water in the outhouse. One had clean water and water-soaked-and-softened corn cobs. The other held the used ones... that got recycled after a cleanup. A Sears Roebuck catalog was preferred but sometimes there just was no more until the next catalog arrived in the mail. AND, this is why all the writers on teotwawki survival techniques and survival preps all recommend you have lots and lots of toilet paper stored away.

    BullShoot
  3. permafrost

    permafrost Active Member

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    Ain't no way in HELL i'm gonna doubt someone who lives in the Ozarks! This man knows whereof he speaks.( I didn't know about the buckets of water, though)
  4. BullShoot

    BullShoot New Member

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    Frosty, good one. Best laugh I've had all day.

    BullShoot
  5. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Way off topic, but when I was a kid lots of homes (in Western PA) still had those little houses. A very nasty Halloween trick was to pick the outhouse up and move it back four or five feet. I leave it to the reader's imagination to consider what happened to the first bleary eyed and sleepy person to make his way there in the morning.

    Jim
  6. reinhard

    reinhard Member

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    I immagine that this person would fall in the s..t hole,and drowned:D
  7. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    The holes weren't that deep, but it would be nasty. I hate to say anyone would deserve that, but in one case I heard of, the perpetrators might have argued that the action was justified based on the victim's behavior.

    Jim
  8. Warith

    Warith Member

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    I too am from MO and corn cobs where still in use when I was a kid.

    They wernt as bad as that wax paper they used in england. My god that stuff was horrible it just smeared it around.
  9. Buffalochip

    Buffalochip Active Member

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    Where I come from we used brown and white corn cobs. First, you'd use a brown corn cob. And then you'd use a white corn cob to see if you needed another brown one.
  10. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Please, I apologize for getting this one off track, and it is going from bad to worse. I'm done here, and I suggest everyone else give this thread a rest.

    Jim
  11. BullShoot

    BullShoot New Member

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    Yeah, let's wipe up this mess and go.
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