Bad reloads or misalligned cylinder?

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Siubasser, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. Siubasser

    Siubasser New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
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    Need to get another opinion on an issue I had today when shooting reloads out of a fairly new Taurus 357 magnum handed down to me from my father.

    Basically I was shooting reloads done by a close friend and his father (supposedly been reloading for many years) when in two occasions only within shooting 25 rounds had something hit me in the cheek causing a pretty cut.

    Now I first deducted that it was not a ricochet due to me shooting into a corn field so let's get that out of the equation.

    Afterwords I contacted my friend and obviously he blamed the revolver saying that the cylinder was misaligned causing the magnum loads to shoot shrapnel out the side thus causing injury.

    So taking his idea into account I went to looking for any signs of damage to the gun which would be caused from this and goin nothing out of the usual to be damaged to the slightest bit.

    After looking further at the casings I found that on two of the casings there where significant fractures starting from the front (one had a single fracture about an eight inch long and another casing had two smaller fractures each about a 16th of an inch long.

    So my question is whether or not the issue I had sounds more like it was caused by the reloads or the gun.

    I am really hoping for a Good reply, as I am now slightly afraid of this gun and am strongly considering takin it to my gunsmith to have it looked at if the problem at all could have been caused my the firearm.

    Thanks for the help, and pictures to follow if they could be of any help.
  2. rcairflr

    rcairflr Well-Known Member

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    I can't tell you what caused your problem, but I can give you some advise. "Do not ever use someone elses reloads in your gun".
  3. The Duke

    The Duke New Member

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    If you are shooting lead bullets, it could be the forcing cone has leaded up...Swing open the cylinder and look at the area at the rear of the barrel throat..If there is a lot of lead inside there, it will need to be removed...A lewis Lead Remover makes this little chore a piece of cake...

    .357 bullets, loaded magnum hot, may cause severe leading..even mild loads will lead up the FC in a properly timed revolver if you fire enough of them.....A leaded forcing cone and/or improper alignment of cylinder can cause a revolver to 'spit' lead from the gap between the cylinder and the forcing cone of the barrel..Too much lead in the FC and barrel can cause dangerous pressures with near max loads....Keep your lead bullet loads midrange and under 1000fps to reduce leading...It could also be the bullets are too soft...Higher velocities require harder lead..

    One way you can determine if it is a timing problem is to very slowly cock the hammer...when the hammer engages the sear, try to rotate the cylinder...If you hear a slight 'click' and feel a minute movement before the cylinder locks up, then you have a problem only a gunsmith can fix properly..
  4. 243winxb

    243winxb New Member

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    Check the timing as said above. If it looks ok, buy and shoot some factory ammo, see what happens. Wear shooting glasses.
  5. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    sounds to me like your buddy and his dad stuffed your loads a bit hot. Cracked case mouths indicate either very old and worn out brass or high pressure. Were the fired primers flat? did you have to coax the fired casing out of the cylinder at all?

    Could also be a range issue. if the cylinder is locking up out of range (off to one side or the other) the bullets will shave when they enter the forcing cone of the barrel.

    Also an excessive barrel cylinder gap will shower you with 'shrapnel' even if the loads are perfectly safe.

    The advice given above is spot on. Take the pistol to a gunsmith and have it checked out. And STOP SHOOTING OTHER PEOPLES RELOADS. Its dangerous. Especially if they didnt develop the load in that weapon.
  6. raysmithson1

    raysmithson1 Member

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    Location:
    Monterey ca. we call it paradise
    my load 6 gr. tightgroup 125 Barrys or Oregon Trails bullets so nice so good on target,,, and no big boom boom,, age has it's perks and yes I have split cases too, cause I'm to damn cheap to buy some new brass,,, nuff said
  7. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    im right there with ya ray. I run brass til it splits or drops primers.
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