Best Boresighter?

Discussion in 'Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun' started by Vermonter, Oct 5, 2006.

  1. Vermonter

    Vermonter New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    57
    I'm looking at various types of boresighting systems and I think I like the Laser boresight that slips into the chamber rather than fits into the muzzle. There are a number of different brands to choose from and I want to be able to boresight several calibers from .223 to 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser etc. Does anyone have any advice about this?
  2. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    5,956
    Location:
    Deep South Mississippi
    I like the manual bore sighter unless you want to put out a couple hundred for an adjustable laser sighter
  3. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,304
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    Bore sighting any gun that you can take apart and sight thorugh the barrel bore needs no help of a commercial bore sighter. That includes most all bolt guns. Lever, semiautos, pumps, most handguns need a bore sighter.

    I use the LaserLyte bore sighter. They have various models but mine came with arbors to fit anything from .22 to .56 caliber. I made an adapter on my lathe for 12 gage shotgun as well but some models will cover shotguns too. The prices range from $45 and up. See

    http://search.cheaperthandirt.com

    My unit works well, fits barrels well, is made of a material that won't harm the bore, and paints a bright dot some 25 yds away down my hall and across my family room. Works for me!

    LDBennett
  4. Vermonter

    Vermonter New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    57
    Well I really would have liked to get the LaserLyte, LD, but I just couldn't wait for yet another UPS delivery. I went with the manual type like you suggested southernshooter. Went to the "local" (30 miles away) gun shop and asked them what they use. Showed me a manual Tasco set that fits in the barrel and has arbors for the full gamut of calibers. One left on the shelf. Sold! Went home and bore-sighted my rifle with its newly mounted scope. See, I just switched to a 50mm objective from a 40mm. Jeez, the new scope was firing so high when I tested it yesterday, I was shooting over paper and over the burm! Anyway, it looks good after a basic boresighting. At least now I'll get on paper.
  5. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,304
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    What do you call a manual bore sighter? Is it a collimator, the type with little screen on an offset arbor that pushes into the barrel that you view through the scope where you see a pattern? Or????

    Just curious.

    LDBennett
  6. Vermonter

    Vermonter New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    57
    I suppose you would call it a collimator - it comes with a lens into which you mount one end of the arbor. The other end pushes into the barrel. You then look through your mounted scope and see the tiny grid and reticle of the boresight lens. The object is to align the scope reticle (using your windage and elevation turrets) with the reticle of the boresight lens. It's certainly not rocket science and probably pretty crude, but at least I have a rough idea of where I am.
  7. terwiliger

    terwiliger New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    10
    A collander isn't that something you use to drain pasta...??? LOL...
  8. ryan_marine

    ryan_marine New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    919
    Location:
    Ohio
    Here is one thing that I do with my auto, pumps and such if you have the area.
    Option #1 Shoot close range and move futher back with a big back stop.
    Option #2 Same as 1 but shoot from a slightly elevated position, in comparson to your target, with a bare ground that is broken up to see the dust fly. Also helps to have a spotter.
    Option #3 Get a bore sighter. I have used several different ones. NONE Were as good as option 1 or 2.

    Ray
  9. I've found bore sighters to be well worth the money and effort so long as one remembers that they are not intended to be perfect. I use mine (one similar to yours, Vermonter) to get me on paper with a newly rebuilt military rifle. Saves lots of frustration, cursing, and wasted ammo. :D I can, and have, boresighted the old fashioned way, but why bother if it's unnecessary?
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 7, 2006
  10. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Messages:
    9,367
    In the time it takes to set the bore sighter up, I can fire two shots and be on target at 100 yards and back on my way home. The cost, two rounds of ammo in almost any light.............you got to shoot it to test it---RIGHT???
    Why waste time sticking crap in the barrel....in the action, unfolding your precision bore sighting target............ect. DANG I GOT BETTER THINGS TO SPEND MONEY AND TIME ON...........like commode ring stain remover.


    LTS
  11. That works, LTS, but only if you happen to be at the range instead of in the garage. I can, and do, boresight my rifles BEFORE I go out to the range and right after I mount a scope or aperture sight using a lens type boresighter. That way, if the scope or sight needs serious readjustment, I can do it without a wasted trip to the range or having to mess with it AT the range.
  12. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Messages:
    9,367
    You still have to fire the rifle/pistol, bore sighted or otherwise, the bore sighter adds a needless step. If you never center your scopes crosshairs prior to doing anything-you are starting afoul before begining either process.


    LTS
  13. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,304
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    liketoshoot:

    I cannnot count the times I have gone to the range to see a guy trying to sight in his newly mounted scope, often mounted by a gun store. They start at 100 yds and cannot find where the bullet is impacting, move to 50 yds with the same result, and end up at 25 yds. They find the bullet impact, adjust the scope, and move back to the 100 yd line. That's more than two shots!

    While it does not happen often, sometimes scope mounts need to be shimmed or, as in every case of Leopold dovetail mounts, adjusted by bore sighting to even be on the paper at 100 yds. If this has not happen to you then you are extremely lucky or haven't mounted very many scopes.

    As I stated previously "Bore sighting any gun that you can take apart and sight thorugh the barrel bore needs no help of a commercial bore sighter. That includes most all bolt guns. Lever, semiautos, pumps, most handguns need a bore sighter." This step of bore sighting saves ammo!

    LDBennett
  14. Vermonter

    Vermonter New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    57
    I agree with you LD and Pistol Shooter. Boresighting with the simple Tasco device I purchased took about 5 minutes. Never again will I go through the 100 yard conundrum at the range (not knowing the point of impact) I wasted about 6 rounds and knew it was time to fold, pack up and go.
  15. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Messages:
    9,367
    I have never shimmed a scope---trued the rings, but never shimmed.

    The first thing any scope mounting to been done is to "center the scopes cross hairs". If you are not doing this, your are begining at a GREAT disatvantage from the very start---somewhere long ago this step has either been forgotten or most just never did it to start with.


    I can take a 3x3ft white heavy paper stapled to two 5-6ft survey sticks and roll it up and it is no bigger than the rifle taken to the range and much lighter.

    At the range I will center a one inch black square on this 3x3ft.

    There are two ways to do this, one requires only two shots-there other requires three shots. You chose.

    1) set the target at twenty five yards and fire------your aiming at the square. If you have centered your cross hairs-you will be on target
    with the scope covers off and the rifle supported, move the cross hairs to the impact point, the second shot will now strike the black square-you will now be good at 100 yards.

    2) for the added third shot move the same target to the 100 yard line and fire the third shot.

    Always remember this, if you do not center your scope`s cross hairs, you are missing the first AND most important step---don`t care what brand of scope it is either............


    LTS
  16. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,304
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    Liketoshoot:

    How do you handle the Leopold style dovetail mounts that have centering screws in the rear mount. Seems to me you could even miss you 3x3 foot target at 25 yds if you don't at least bore sight those mounts/scope to the barrel bore.

    I too can usually sight in a rifle with a few shots. If I bore sight first I can skip your 25 yd shot and go right to 100 yds with two shots. Saved one whole bullet!

    In reality I bore sight (extremely easy with bolt gun: remove bolt, align bore with target by looking through the bore then move scope cross hairs to center of target, at any range from 25 yds in my house down the hall or at the range on the 100 yd line), then shoot a three shot group and with the the gun held firmaly on the aim point, move the scope cross hairs to the bullet impact center between the three shots. When I start shooting for score I may do some fine adjusting between groups using the 1/4 inch per click (1/2 or 1/8 on some scopes) at 100 yds.

    Bore sighting is not THE answer but only a step in the process to get the gun to shoot where I aim. If it takes two, three, or 20 shots, I don't care as long as the end result is a gun that shoots where it is pointed, accurately. The cost of ammo is a small part of shooting expenses when you consider that bolt guns start at about $400, and good scope at about $150 and I am never happy with entry level guns or scopes. Mine usually are 50% to 100% more!

    We all develope our own processes for using our guns. Yours is no better or worse than mine. Mine works for me and yours for you but yours doesn't allow for all situations and all mounts. Adding the bore sighting to the process in my case eliminates having to move back and forth between shooting benches for the various shooting ranges (25 and 100). Your facility may allow you to stay on one bench, others do not. At least I only have to walk our to 100yds once.

    Here's to good shooting regardless of the process to get there.

    LDBennett
  17. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Messages:
    9,367
    You are correct, what ever works for you.
    """Leopold style dovetail mounts"""" Never used them and never will.
    I never mount a scope with over a 40mm objective either.


    LTS
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun Best Looking/Most Accurate .30-06 Rifle? Feb 14, 2014
Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun best scope under 1500? Jan 6, 2014
Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun My new best friend Jan 5, 2014
Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun Questions on using the best slug for a particular barrel. Sep 2, 2013
Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun Best 308 bolt action? Apr 7, 2013