Best Rural Places to Live?

Discussion in 'The Fire For Effect and Totally Politically Incorr' started by Doug.38PR, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. Doug.38PR

    Doug.38PR Member

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    http://money.aol.com/progfarmer/realestate/best-rural-places-to-live

    I'm sure these are, for the moment, the best places to live. In my view, any place that such sources consider the worst place to live is actually the best place.
    What do I mean by that? People who write these articles and read them are the type rural communities (real America) don't want. Why? Because they come in swarms over the years with their flip flop wearing lispy voice or yankee accented effeminant fathers driving minivans full of loud obnoxious ill-mannered children and their controlling presumptuous wives. The come with their sissy helmet wearing bicyclers with their knee pads and bright green vests that take up the right lane of roads. They come crowding in beautiful rural areas with their gated communities and crammed up suburbs. They come with their lispy voiced couples setting up bed and breakfast places. They come with their hippie looking artsi weirdos that just want to sit around the roadside painting mountains to "get in touch with their inner feeling"

    Such sewage that seeps out from the cities has no culture or roots and in swarms destroys the culture that these quite easy going rural communities have. Their votes and their customs destroy the liberty of real Americans. They vote for anti-gun laws. Anti-shooting laws. Environmental laws. No-burning laws. No-hunting laws. No-horses laws. No-fireworks laws. They vote for interstate highways and mass transit so they can get back to visit the dungheap they came from easier (at your expense: land, noise, crime increase, etc.).

    Thing of it is, it may be that these people want to move out of this cities to get away from it all...but then want to bring it all out to the country (everything they don't like about the city.). But I'm wondering if it really isn't that these people, like Yankee snowflyers in to the South, just want to move in these places because they like the climate and want to remake everything in their self-righteous image. Dad's always said the worst thing to ever happen to the South wasn't the War of Northern Aggression, it wasn't Reconstruction, it wasn't segregation, it wasn't integration, it wasn't the so-called Civil Rights movement....... it was air conditioning. Made it more attractive and comfortable for "those people" (as Lee called them) to move down here permenantly.

    Personally, I would love to see the day when the cities dwindle to almost nothing and people in them move back home to their roots in real America. But not to remake the area into their effeminate dependant city image, but for the true Agrarian vision that the best men of the Founding Fathers generation. I don't mean everybody should go out and buy a farm. But living in the country and keeping your trade, whatever it may be, local somehow. Keep your county or town autonomous.
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009
  2. SaddleSarge

    SaddleSarge New Member

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    Yup, wish this city folk would quit bringing their city baggage with their sorry butts. We've had them move out our way and complain about the tractor noise, well pump noise, dust from plowing the ground, etc... all from city transplants. All these things went on for 50 years before they arrived.

    They even caused my neighbor to have to spend $20K+ on a new irrigation engine that was quieter. My place is 150 yards from it and theirs 500yds+ away! After causing the expense to the grower, they frickin' moved!

    I even had animal control called on me by one of these frickin' wing nuts because they were "concerned" about the number of horses we had on the ranch.:rolleyes: (25 horses some ours, some client's in boarding/training on about an acre/horse).

    But then, these are the same folk that buy a house in the flight path for an airport and then b*tch about the noise. What, did you wake up one morning and found that while you slept that they built an international airport near you?:mad:
  3. Doug.38PR

    Doug.38PR Member

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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009
  4. fmacsin1

    fmacsin1 New Member

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    I agree that turning back to the country and the agrarian way of life is a good thing. I live WAY in the country and love living here. I think turning back to our "farming" values, etc will be the saving of our country and our country women and men. However, I must take a little issue with the terms: "Yankee snowflyers;" my "Guide-hunting, well-armed" father would be rolling over in his grave at being called a "Yankee accented effeminate father(s)." Not all yankees are that liberal and disliked (except the NYYankees; I'm a Boston RedSox fan)! Thanks for the chance to reply, though!
  5. SARG

    SARG Member

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    Doug... Excellent post & observation. What you describe is applicable to communities only 30 miles from the bigger cities up North as well.
  6. Doug.38PR

    Doug.38PR Member

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    Let me be clear then: Not everybody from north of the mason dixon is a Yankee. http://www.lewrockwell.com/wilson/wilson12.html
    Lots of people up there, like you and your dad, are real true Americans. Unfortunately, much of what creep down here are busy body effeminate yankees (as the Southerner understands the term)
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009
  7. fmacsin1

    fmacsin1 New Member

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    Thanks, Doug. I knew what you meant! I just had to put a vote in!
  8. Doug.38PR

    Doug.38PR Member

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    Ahh, you're in Maine. The state of Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. A true soldier and man of honour:

    What's it like up there? Hills? Tall pine trees? Rocky cliffside coastline?
    You know, I don't know of any major city in Maine (that's a good thing). The farthest North I've been is New Haven, Conn. (hub of liberalism)

    Have your small towns been dwindling down over the past 50 years? Have your farms been sold to big timber and farming companies? or to big developers who want to put up houses? Down here it's hard for the iindividual farmer to make it.
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009
  9. fmacsin1

    fmacsin1 New Member

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    It's just as difficult up here in Maine to make it as a farmer as in most states. There are very few farms left, owned by the small farmer, that is! Most dairy farms are owned by corporations. Our towns, which have usually revolved around the woods industry, paper-making and such have been depleted drastically. Again, even corporations are finding it difficult to make paper here. Thirty years ago, Maine was basically a "logging-industry" state. Where I live at Moosehead Lake ( a lake 40 miles by 20 miles) most of the land around it was owned by paper companies about 10% of it was privately owned. Once the logging industry ran out, Maine really started to key in on tourism as an industry. As an old Maine "fart" myself, we were used to going anywhere we wanted to to hunt and fish whenever because the paper companies owned everything and allowed us on their property. Now, miles and miles of tree-covered land is becoming sold to individuals who have the money and it's getting more difficult to just go like we used to. Maine is probably still 85% tree-covered, but the trees are too small for the big companies to want to harvest anymore. We have just about anything you might like for terrain up here. In the northern part, it's basically all potato fields. In the middle is the start of the Appalachian Trail with Mt. Katahdin as its start. Lots of "small mountains" nothing like Colorado. We have some great ski areas. Hunting and fishing and trapping still go on here religiously: moose, deer, ruffed grouse, bear, rabbit, muskrat, weasel, and more. I think our major city is Portland, ME with a population of around 20,000. I'm guessing, I'm 3 hrs. away from there. Southern Maine is where the most of the population lives, but people "from away" think it's still in the boonies! We have 2500 lakes and ponds, numerous streams and rivers and 3500 miles of rocky coastline. Everyone (most of the natives, that is) see living here as a "survivalist sport" especially during the winter months! Maine's land mass could include the rest of New England within its borders and only a little over 1 million people live here. Sorry about rambling, but this gives you a pretty good idea of the state. And yes, we are extremely proud of Gen. Chamberlain!
  10. Doug.38PR

    Doug.38PR Member

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    Sounds a lot like my area. In the early 1900s my great grandfather on my mothers side moved down from Missouri to Bastrop, Louisiana. Later in the 1920s or 30s he became manager for the Local Paper Mill owned by IP. (actually...there were two mills in town at the time and I think he managed both). Years before I was born one of the mills shut down. Much of the northern part of Morehouse Parish was timber country owned by Georgia Pacific. And to this day, it is a VERY popular hunting and wilderness spot. In the 1950s, my great grandad died. A few months ago...the last mill died as well. IP shut it down. Now Bastrop's future is uncertain. My family lives all in that area and I am about to move there and indeed have a house going up there north of town. My job doesn't revolve around the paper industry, but it still hurts a lot of people. The town is smaller now than it was when my mom was growing up there. The demographics have reversed as well (racially and povertywise).
    Much of the eastern part of the Parish and all the way over to the Mississippi has large farmers...but I believe they take their marching orders from big corporations.
    Northeast Louisiana is a quite off the beaten path kind of place. Most people there don't realize how good they have it. There are a few politicians who jump for joy at the mention of an interstate highway coming through there (which probably won't happen for another 30 years...which hopefully means NEVER)
    Mom, who grew up there and now lives in Houston, once told me that you never appreciate what you've left behind until you've been away.
  11. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Doug.38PR, check your PM's.
  12. ponycar17

    ponycar17 Active Member

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    Upstate, SC is such a place that has been ruined by northern immigration over the past 15 years. My wife's best friend was out to lunch in Columbia where she works (about 1.5 hours from here) with a coworker and ran into a lady in a restaurant who was very interested in talking to the friend and her lunch buddy. The lady said she was new here from NY and wanted to explore the area. The lady said she had found this WONDERFUL town that they simply wouldn't believe. The wife's friend asks where it is... The lady replies, "Simpsonville, do you know where that is?..." My wife's friend who's also a native to this area replies, "yes, I remember when it was nice..." :D It's true too... I used to love my drive to work on weekends back in college (latter 90s) in that area and now it's subdivision yuppy hell. :mad:
  13. doug66

    doug66 New Member

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    County I live in was rated #6 in household spending. I'm not so sure that is a good thing. I don't think most of us around here are saving too much. I do know if we had more, we'd spend more.
  14. Bubblehead

    Bubblehead New Member

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    My wife and I recently moved from the city to a beautiful rural area in the mountains at 4000'. The first thing that I told my neighbors was that we didn't want to bring our flatland mentality to the mountains. We wanted to understand, respect and adopt their way of life. I asked my neighbors to let me know if and when our stupidity raised it's ugly head. The message was well received and the folks up here have been very generous in helping us adapt to our change in lifestyle.

    It's all about attitude and respect.

    John
  15. fmacsin1

    fmacsin1 New Member

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    You're absolutely correct; it is about attitude and respect. Many people move to an area and then want that area to be exactly like the one they just moved away from! I'm sure your neighbors, John, really appreciated your sentiments!
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