bp revolvers ????

Discussion in 'Black Powder Shooting / Muzzleloaders / Handguns' started by remington1990, Feb 22, 2011.

  1. remington1990

    remington1990 New Member

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    I am looking at either a 1858 army or a 1860 army I like the looks of the 1860 army but the. 1858 army has the top strap so I can take the cylinder with having to take the gun apart. And what's everybody views on changing the cylinder in a civil war reenactment on the field. And what everybody views on pietta revolver thanks
  2. Pustic

    Pustic Member

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    I own five 1858 Remingtons and no Colts. Go with the Remington.

    You can also convert the .44 to a .45 Long Colt just by switching the cylinder.
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2011
  3. hunter29180

    hunter29180 Well-Known Member

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    many civil war shooters carry extra cylinders. on the battle field 10 sec reloads were the diffrence between living and "pushing" daisys. i had a old picture of 2 union sharpshooters cleaning their pistols and rifles. they each had 7-8 cylinders on the camp table for the pistols.
  4. tyc

    tyc New Member

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    Good grief! ... and I thought three, perhaps four cylinders to go with my Remington "New Army" would be sufficient. :)

    tyc
  5. hawksnest88

    hawksnest88 New Member

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    Depends what/who is in front of you, gonna eat you. :confused::D Bill
  6. remington1990

    remington1990 New Member

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    I think I will go with the remington because I some people told me that changing the cylinder wasn't done as much as they do it in the reenactments but they said it was done some. Thanks
  7. imray

    imray New Member

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    after the battles, the soldiers that were still alive and in fighting condition for the next battle would scavenge the battlefield of the dead and take any cylinders or guns that might help them in the next battle. At the beginning of the battle they may have 3 or 4 handguns stuck in their belts along with as many charged cylinders that would easily change out like the new army cyl. and just toss them aside as the fight progressed. If they survived they could come back later perhaps and pick up more replacements for the next fight. After many battles they found barrels stuffed past the mid point with balls and powder. During the confusion many a gun was loaded over and over again without a ball leaving the barrel. At Gettysburg one was found with 21 balls and charges in the same barrel. I suppose it was easy to get excited and so noisy you couldn't hear your own gun fire. They found thousands of guns with multiple charges and balls in them, totally unfireable, yet still being charged and capped and shot, thinking they were shooting and fighting. Pure HELL. best wishes, ray
  8. tyc

    tyc New Member

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    I've heard of that before and your assessment of "Pure HELL" is accurate.

    tyc
  9. Hawg

    Hawg Active Member

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    Pietta revolvers made before 2000 were sometimes not up to par but many were. Pietta's made in 2000 and later are very good quality, rivaling or exceeding Uberti. Swapping cylinders in a reenactment would be ok but it wasn't done in the old days. Cavalrymen during the war especially Southerners carried up to eight revolvers. When one was emptied it was either holstered or discarded to be retrieved or replaced later. I'm of the discard and retrieve mindset. I don't think many would be wanting to be fumbling around trying to find a holster while on a galloping horse and under fire, let alone trying to swap cylinders under the same conditions.
  10. remington1990

    remington1990 New Member

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    I finally got me a bp revolver I got the 1858 remington army from cabelas it was the best priced pistol I could find I like the spiller and burr it it was a lot higher I rather had brass frame any how.
  11. Hawg

    Hawg Active Member

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    With that brass frame you're going to be limited to about 20 grain charges from a .44 More than that will batter and stretch the frame.
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