Brown Bess?

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by Canfield, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. rhmc24

    rhmc24 Member

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    I guess somehow the wrong button got pushed - if I did it I apologize. Looking back into this thread I don't see how the ID of whether or not a gun being a Bess got into arming natives in the French & Indian War. I was once a somewhat student of the F&I War and agree essentially with your precis. If I get time today I will explore this thread for content and whatever (if any) may be read between the lines. I once assembled soething of a collection of guns of the colonial period, several likely seeing service in the F&IW as well as the American Rev. Most prominent were the different characteristics of my French 1733 pistols -- but that is for another thread. Best, rhmc24
  2. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    The connection is simply that those so-called "trade muskets" were sold/traded to the Indians for use against England's enemies; they were military type arms, to be used for a military purpose. The arms supplied by the crown to militia units (at least in the "American colonies") were the standard issue Brown Bess, though often of older versions, and that was (at least on paper) the standard musket of the fledgling American army. Rifles, in spite of the often fanciful stories about them, played only a very small part in the fighting that determined the outcome of the Revolution.

    Later, the Americans received so many muskets from France, that the French .69 caliber became the American standard, and remained so until 1855.

    Jim
  3. Canfield

    Canfield New Member

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    Hey guys -

    I have another query and can't seem to figure out how to start a new thread. A friend discovered this percussion pistol in her family's belongings. It appears to be .44 caliber. Overall length 7 inches, with a 3 inch barrel. One piece grip, probably walnut. There is a proof mark under the barrel (the pic isn't great, I know) and also someone has etched the Roman Numeral XIII there. Any help in identifying this pistol would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    [​IMG]
  4. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    To start a new thread, go back to the folder heading "Technical Questions and Information". Scroll down a few lines and you will see a blue oval button on the left that says "New Thread". You will need to give your new thread a title.

    As long as we are here, that gun looks like a common boxlock pistol. They were made by the thousands in England, the U.S., Belgium and France between about 1835 and 1865, and many more thousands of reproductions have been made in recent years in Spain and Italy.

    The picture is so huge it doesn't want to come up for me, perhaps someone else can identify the marking. If the gun is an antique and in good shape, it would probably bring around $250, around $100 for a repro.

    Jim
    Last edited: May 6, 2012
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