bullet resistance vests

Discussion in 'Self Defense Tactics & Weapons' started by johnlives4christ, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    howdy. well i have a question. can i buy and wear a bullet resistant vest, like what the cops wear. i have always heard that regular individuals cannot have body armor. several magazines i have looked through restrict sale of it to LEO and military. but i seen some selling on ebay a few days ago. is it differant from state to state, is it federal. was somebody BS'ing me.

    whats the low down

    ~john
  2. bntyhntr6975

    bntyhntr6975 Member

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    You can get them. Not always easy or cheap though. Whether or not you are supposed to have it is up to your state I believe. But, suppose you strap on the kevlar and go out on the town. You end up in a little gunfight. It won't exactly look like self defense anymore. It would appear that you had invited the battle, rather than attempting to avoid it. Its really a no-win situation. If you are wanting it for SHTF type thing, why would it matter if you are allowed to have it? Its not exactly legal to be involved in a battle with the mutant zombies anyway..... We probly won't be allowed to have ammo either, so whats another charge of contraband?
  3. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    What you say is true, non the less I think it a good investment.

    There are several scenarios where armour would be useful and justifiable. For example while defending oneself against armed intruders in your own home. Soft armour should be available to anyone most places, many of the bigger manufactures will have web sites, Second Chance used to be a good firm.

    It's worth spending some time shopping around and considering what level of protection you need. As a rule of thumb the higher the protection, the higher the cost and the heavier the vest. Protection against shotgun and handgun calibre's is possibly the best compromise, though many will disagree. Dont forget a trauma layer, to absorb the inward movement of the blunted projectile. Protection against high velocity rifle fire is more expensive and much heavier, including the use of ceramic plates. As I said, trawl some sites, you will learn a lot.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 23, 2009
  4. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    im not really planning on anything or shtf stuff , just trying to debunk all the myths i've heard and find out exactly what i can and cannot get legally in my area. im just thinking it would be cool to have
  5. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Depends on Uncle Sam's whim every 3 yrs.
    You can't own it if you're a felon.

    In Connecticut, you can't buy it online or by mail unless you're LE or mil. But can buy it in a store.

    Nearly every state has some specific little law concerning body armor. None really prohibit you from buying it, but may regulate the means you buy and have it delivered.

    In almost every state, any crime committed while wearing body armor will either add a separate charge or enhance your charges. So...it could get you in deeper doo-doo if you shoot without justification. I'd think on the civil side it might play in the other sides favor too.

    If you try to sell your Level III armor outside the US or to a non-citizen, the transfer falls under export control laws just like a firearm. Level II you can only sell to countries on the BIS list.

    In Kentucky, you should be good to go. Kentucky does not prohibit ownership so long as you have no felonies. Kentucky does however have the law in place to deny parole to anyone convicted of a violent crime with a deadly weapon while wearing body armor.


    P.S. If you buy some armor...Point Blank is the best in my opinion.


    Federal Law

    Section 931. Prohibition on purchase, ownership, or possession of body armor by violent felons

    (a) In General. - Except as provided in subsection (b), it shall
    be unlawful for a person to purchase, own, or possess body armor,
    if that person has been convicted of a felony that is -
    (1) a crime of violence (as defined in section 16); or
    (2) an offense under State law that would constitute a crime of
    violence under paragraph (1) if it occurred within the special
    maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States.

    (b) Affirmative Defense. -
    (1) In general. - It shall be an affirmative defense under this
    section that -
    (A) the defendant obtained prior written certification from
    his or her employer that the defendant's purchase, use, or
    possession of body armor was necessary for the safe performance
    of lawful business activity; and
    (B) the use and possession by the defendant were limited to
    the course of such performance.

    (2) Employer. - In this subsection, the term "employer" means
    any other individual employed by the defendant's business that
    supervises defendant's activity. If that defendant has no
    supervisor, prior written certification is acceptable from any
    other employee of the business.
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2009
  6. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    thanks for the info delta.
  7. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Depends on Uncle Sam's whim every 3 yrs.
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