C&R full auto

Discussion in 'NFA Firearms & Related Items' started by Montie364, Jul 2, 2009.

  1. Montie364

    Montie364 New Member

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    Jun 14, 2009
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    Location:
    Arizona
    Ok just suppose I get my C&R, and lightning strikes I happen to find an old WWII thompson would it be legal for me to buy it.
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    From the Arizona Statutes

    >MACHINE GUNS
    A machine gun is defined as a firearm that is capable of shooting more than one shot automatically, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger.
    It is unlawful to manufacture, possess, transport, sell, or transfer a machine gun. This does not apply to peace officers, members of the military forces of the United States or persons specifically licensed, authorized or permitted pursuant to an Arizona statute or the National Firearms Act. This also does not apply to any machine gun registered in the national firearms registry and transfer records of the U.S. Treasury Department or classified as a curio or relic by the U.S. Treasury Department. <

    The only advantage I can see to having your C&R is that, if the gun you want is out of state, you would not have to go through a Type 2 or Type 3 SOT FFL to get it. Right now, if you found a gun in Texas (for example), you would have to buy the gun, have it transferred to a dealer in Arizona, then do another transfer from the Arizona dealer to you. This costs another 200 dollar transfer fee, a little more time, and the dealer will charge a commission (at least another hundred bucks). If you have your C&R, and the gun in Texas is C&R, it can be transferred directly to you.

    There are some states where the only way you can own a machine gun is if it is C&R and you have a C&R license. Arizona isn't one of those states.

    If the gun is already in the state, you don't need an FFL being involved in the transfer. You can transfer it directly from the owner, whether or not the gun is C&R, and whether or not you have a C&R.
  3. medalguy

    medalguy Member

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    I know I'm a little late, but I just saw this posting. IMPORTANT: If a fully automatic weapon is NOT already registered and you find it, you MAY NOT legally acquire it in any shape, form, or fashion. My best advice is run, don't walk, away from it. It cannot be registered or transferred to you or anyone else. It's a little silly that we can't register weapons that were not registered during the 1968 amnesty if we find one, but that's the fact.
  4. TOOHSOTKIL

    TOOHSOTKIL New Member

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    That would be 1986.
  5. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    No, 1968. 1986 was the cut-off date for buying new, but there was an amnesty in '68 that allowed you to register non-papered NFA items without getting arrested for having contraband. WW2 bring-backs. That shotgun grandpa cut a little short and you've been hiding it in the hayloft. That pistol Uncle Bob carries on his trap-line, that he made by cutting down a 22 rifle. That kind of stuff.
  6. Hammerslagger

    Hammerslagger New Member

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    Jul 30, 2009
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    Alpo is absolutely correct; November 1 through 30, 1968. I lived through it.

    My affluent next door neighbor accumulated and registered over 35 items ranging from WW I 8X57mm Maxims to a US Property marked Colt M16A1 to the only known surviving example of some rare Japanese heavy MG variant and just about one of everything else used in WW II by the US and the Germans.

    When I asked him if he was really going to try paper the latest model M16, he responded that his position was that "Charlie" captured it from us, and we recaptured it from "Charlie". He was certain that it had been in V. Nam. He got away with it.

    He ended up being a paid exhibitor at some well known Gun shows. All went profitably and well for a few years. Then the political winds changed and he came under the very close scrutiny of Federal LE. So close and cozy that he took their suggestion and donated his entire collection to some museum.

    This guys experiences are one reason I stay further away from such items than a agitated rattlesnake.
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