Ceramic blades

Discussion in 'Knives & Edged Items' started by armedandsafe, May 30, 2004.

  1. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    I just picked up one of those ceramic blades from Sportsmans Guide. Does anyone have any experience with ceramic blades? I do understand they can't be used as screwdrivers or can openers. :D

    Pops
  2. pickenup

    pickenup Active Member

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    Nope, can’t use them for screwdrivers or can openers. Now if you are going to use them as a knife, they work great. Hold an edge for what seems like forever. They do break if mistreated, or dropped wrong.

    What kind did you get?
  3. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    I got the little paring knife for $15. I figured that would be good to try out the technology and would be a nice knife for my tackle box. I've only used it a couple of times, but I'm inpressed, so far. Sharp little devil, it is. I'm interested to see how it does on filleting small fish.

    Pops
  4. Don Buckbee

    Don Buckbee New Member

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    I'm new to the Knife Forum, and maybe someone has posted what I'm going to mention before.. Sorry if that's the case.
    I understand that the Ceramic blades can't be sharpened by conventional techniques when they do get dull. Anybody have any info on that issue?
    Good to be with knife people... :) I love knives....
    Don
  5. pickenup

    pickenup Active Member

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    Don, first......welcome aboard.

    As far as I know (and this could have changed since I last researched it) but since ceramic knives are made with minute ceramic particles that are bonded together with heat (a process called sintering) they can only be sharpened with special equipment using diamond discs, which are not yet available to the public. Not saying that if you have friends in (low) ;) places you cannot get ahold of the equipment to do it. I never tried to find it, as I have not had a ceramic knife that needed sharpening yet. There are several places where you can "send them in" to be sharpened.
  6. Don Buckbee

    Don Buckbee New Member

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    Pickenup,
    About 10 years ago, I was thinking about buying a ceramic knife, a Boker (sp?) I think. I did a little research on them, and called their headquarters in Denver, I think it was, asking about how they are sharpened. They told me I would have to send it to them for sharpening when it got dull. About that same time, I had a buddy who went Caribou hunting with one, and he broke it because they are brittle. So, I never bought one. But, I keep thinking about the advantages of them provided they are treated right. I'm still thinking.... :) I usually wind up wanting a sharp knife, and they are all dull. It would be nice to have a knife that doesn't need sharpening often.
    Thanks for the reply,
    Don
  7. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    The instruction I got with mine indicated they can be sharpened with a common DIAMOND hone, but have to be sent in if they need reshaped. I did just a little honing on mine with my fine diamond hone and increased the edge sharpness.

    Pops
  8. Don Buckbee

    Don Buckbee New Member

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    Good Info!!!

    Armedandsafe,
    That's good info!!! Never knew that before. Maybe I'll get one after all. I got a diamond stick that should work on them. They do have lots of advantages, including use in the kitchen. They sure won't rust, are easily cleaned and hold am edge forever compared to steel blades.
    I got this passion for knives like 22 rifles... :D
  9. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Here are a few of my thoughts.

    I wouldn't use a stick or bar on these. I'd use a flat hone at least 3 inches wide and set an angle to match the one already there. I'd be very slow and patient during resharp to keep everything as precise as possible. If you have diamond stones for a Lansky or Smith clamp sharpener, that is probably the best. When you get waves or wiggles in your edge on a metal knife, you can work them out. In this case, the ceramic knife has to be sent back to the factory or to a professional who REALLY knows and has the right tooling.

    That will be $0.02, please.

    Pops
  10. Don Buckbee

    Don Buckbee New Member

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    Good advice.. Appreciate it much..
    I like the positive aspects of Ceramic. Most of my knife use is in the kitchen as I like to eat...LOL :D So, Ceramic would be easy to clean and wouldn't stain after cutting things like tomatoes, oranges and other things that would stain a steel blade. I have some of the old kitchen knives that were made 50-60 years ago out of the steel that stains in a heartbeat. They are OK when sharp. But, I guess I'm getting lazy as I'd rather be working on rifles than sharpening blades. I bought a number of them at garage sales a couple of years ago as people don't want them any more. They seem to sharpen easily and do hold an edge pretty well. The handles on them were in bad shape, so I put new handles on them so they at least look good in the knife block. The blades don't look good as they are all pretty black from staining, but they are clean and sanitary, which is all I'm interested in.
    I will look into the ceramic blades... :)
    Thanks,
    Don
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