Chamfering and deburring question

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by ChuckR, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. ChuckR

    ChuckR Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2011
    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    South East Michigan
    Hi guys,
    Sorry to be asking so many questions lately, but there is no one around me that reloads. Also I checked the back post and have not found this asked before. After trimming the cases, they then need to be chamfered and deburred. When looking at tools to do this, I see they come with different angles ( ex. 45 degree-32 degree-28 degree). As I only shoot at ranges and plinking, does it make a difference on what angle I should use. If so what would be the best one to use?. I went on google. but did not find any good articles on this . As always thanks for any input you can give.

    Chuck
  2. cpttango30

    cpttango30 Guest

    No it won't make much difference in plinking ammo. I use the standard chamfer debuting tool for debuting. I like the Lyman VLD chamfering tool myself I have less shaved bullets when I use it. Plus you can unscrew it from the handle and put it in a drill for a little faster trimm time..
  3. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,271
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    The standard double ended chamfer deburr tool is 45*. thats what i use, i have several. one I keep in my Bow toolbox for deburring cut arrow shafts before gluing in the new inserts. The VLD deburr tools are more angled to get a deeper longer chamfer on the inside of the casemouth so seating bullets doesnt distort the jacket. Someday ill buy one but for now the thousands of cases I have bedurred with my lymans and RCBS tools have left them still sharp. They apparently last a lifetime.
  4. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,549
    As far as chamfering and be-burring - you only need to chamfer and de-burr to get rid of the burr left when you trim the case. One thing you don't want to do is make a sharp edge on the case. You will have just de-burred too much and risk a split case neck. You just want to get rid of the burrs.

    To the tools - I use an RCBS chamfering tool. Had it so long I don't remember when I bought it. The one before it was a LEE tool, and it went dull pretty quick. Think the RCBS tool is a 45 degree angle.
  5. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,271
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    I gave up on the lee tool becasue I didnt like the design of it. The outside debur step made an ugly ring on the side of a perfectly perfect case.

    I still have it, its still sharp, but i dont use it.
  6. howlnmad

    howlnmad Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Messages:
    4,783
    Location:
    Harriman, Tn
    I'm glad that I'm not the only one that's noticed that.
  7. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    4,953
    Location:
    SW Fort Worth
    I use the RCBS/Wilson. It's worked perfectly, just one or two quick twists and the burr is gone.
  8. myfriendis410

    myfriendis410 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Messages:
    603
    Location:
    Lompoc California
    You might find a sharp angle inside deburring tool to be of more use in small caliber stuff like .223 and 22-250. I use the standard RCBS hand tool for all of my stuff and like others have said above; you are only "breaking" the edge and not removing a ton of metal. The outside chamfering is equally important to maintain consistent neck tension on the bullet when it's chambered in the rifle.

Share This Page