Checkering tools?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by swanshot, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    Thought I might have a go at doing some restocking. See if I can do it.
    Anyone had experience whith checkering, and/or advice on checkering tools?
    Make that; chequering, if you prefer the traditional spelling.:rolleyes: :D
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2004
  2. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Swannie, I'm no help on doing the checkering, but you can find tools for it at this place.

    brownells
  3. CountryGunsmith

    CountryGunsmith New Member

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    I've used both traditional hand tools and electric set-ups. I prefer the hand tools if I am only working one stock every now and then, especially if there are sharp curves, corners or border work. The electric set up works great for covering large areas.

    Best bet is start relatively coarse, say 20 lpi. Use the simpler patterns that actually transfer to the stock. Go slow, and cut shallow lines to start your pattern. You then use the 2 or 3-line tools to lay out the bulk of the panel. Use a single edge tool to work into the points and up to the borders. After the pattern is laid out, go back and deepen the lines until the diamonds point up.

    Remember that checkering is done AFTER the first few coats of finish are applied. The finish helps the points stay together and will give you a cleaner pattern. Once you are done with your pattern, a light finish coat will seal the lines.

    Dem-Bart or Gunline, doesn't matter. You don't need to buy the expensive 'Master' kits at this point, just make sure you have a good basic set, a joiner, and a riffler.
  4. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    Thanks Country Gunsmith

    This is exactly the advice I wanted.
    Now, to see if my skills are up to it. I have a beautifull piece of timber to work with. Two years ago it was a large continiaster tree in our back yard. Neighbours didn't like it hangin over their fence so instead of sayin somthing, they just poisoned it.:mad: :mad:
    This timber is very hard, middle to heavy weight, with an interlocking grain, polishes to a high finish and has a lovely figure.
    Pale brown with dark figure. This has just gotta look good, and there's only one way to find out if it is stable enough.:) :)

    Thanks again.
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2004
  5. SouthernMoss

    SouthernMoss *Admin Tech Staff*

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    Hey Swannie! Never heard of a continiaster tree, but the wood sounds lovely. Post a pic of the wood if you can, so we can see how it looks. And be sure to post progress pics while you're working on it. :)
  6. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Sure would like to see that one myself! Post away, Swannie!
  7. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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  8. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    Woops! We'll try that again
    Hard to get straight pieces out of, but I reckon I can get 1 decent stock and as many pistol grips as I care for.
    This piece is about a foot long.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 15, 2004
  9. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    Damnit! I got it wrong again. A horticultrulist I aint:( :(
    The lovely Mrs swanshot read the earlier post and asked "what the hell is continiaster". It's Cotoneaster, a European tree, deciduous, with masses of red berries in season.
  10. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    Minn-eeee-sota, ya, sure, you bet!
    Wow......that's nice lookin' wood, Swannie!
  11. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    lovely, isn't it? It's gonna be fun seening what I can do with it
    I've got plenty of scraps to play with, so I don't have to trash the good bits finding out how to work it.
  12. SouthernMoss

    SouthernMoss *Admin Tech Staff*

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    That's beautiful, Swannie! Can't wait to see the results. :)
  13. BlueTic

    BlueTic New Member

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    That is a nice lookin piece of wood Swanshot. I just picked up a piece of Lacewood from your neck of the woods - gonna restock my 700.

    Attached Files:

  14. SouthernMoss

    SouthernMoss *Admin Tech Staff*

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    Nice, Blue Tic!
  15. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    Lace wood I don't know. It looks very like what we call Queensland maple. Do you know it by any other name?
    But whatever, it's a nice lookin piece.:D
  16. BlueTic

    BlueTic New Member

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    Yes - it also goes by Queensland Maple. I can't remember which part of AusiWorld it comes from. I think it is also called plane oak in England. Wish I'd of seen cotoneaster before, that will make a real purdy stock!!!!
  17. swanshot

    swanshot New Member

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    Contoneaster you can't get as a comercially milled timber. It's one of those timbers used by wood turners and carvers. Ya just gotta get luckey.
    The Queensland maple is a nice timber that you'll find easy to work because it is very consistant, no nasty surprises:eek:
    The little bit of playing I've done with Contoneaster to date suggests that I'm gonna have to cut, file, route it to shape.
    The grain is all over the place so it can't be shaped with planing tools, spokeshaves etc.

    Another timber that Is very nice, and I considered using is Olive, but once again ya gotta get lucky, find a tree that's going and mill it yourself. A lotta work.
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2004
  18. BlueTic

    BlueTic New Member

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    I don't know about checkering though - I'll send mine out and have it done. I'm a bit worried that checkering will tear out some of the "eye" spots in this type of wood. Course now - if you are like me - this is a low priority project, I've got honey-dooos stacked up to get done before I can play with my stuff.....;)
  19. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    My hands are not steady enough any more to even consider checkering as a hobby. Would have liked to though! :D :D
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2004
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