Classic/collectible guns?

Discussion in 'The Pre-Ban Forum' started by hogger129, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. hogger129

    hogger129 Active Member

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    I recently went to a gun show in my area and there were a few rifles I had a particular interest in. One that I really liked was the M1 Carbine. It was not the civilian M14, it was like an M1 Carbine, the guy said it was a WWII US-issue rifle. I believe it was a 30.06. I'm not entirely sure on that one, but I am pretty sure it wasn't made for 7.62x51. I also really liked the M1 Garand. The M1 Garand was a bit more expensive. Both rifles seemed to be in good shape. But I almost liked the M1 Carbine better because it had a detachable magazine, felt a bit lighter, and seemed shorter, and I liked the look better. Also, does one need to get a FFL to legally own these in the home? Which is better in terms of accuracy and reliability? I also did not see any M1A there. I saw an SKS. None had the detachable mag. They were all the semi-auto, fixed magazine style. One was a Russian one, one was a Yugoslavian model. Anyone have any experience with any of these firearms and have a recommendation or opinion about any of them? I like the M1 Carbine about the best. I would prefer it for home defense and I really don't want to get an AR-15. Just because I feel like I would attract unwanted attention from police and other idiots who live near me if I owned an AR as opposed to something that is intended to be a replica of a WWII rifle.
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2009
  2. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    first off the M1 carbine fires a cartridge called the 30 carbine. it's a pistol caliber in terms of size and power. the M1Garand or simply M1 fires a 30-06 and has an enclosed magazine that uses a little 8 shot clip called and enblock clip. the M1A is a 308/7.62x51 caliber rifle based on the M1 rifle. it uses a detachable box magazine of 5, 10, 20, or 30 rounds. military mags if i recall correctly were 20 rounders.

    the m1 carbine used either a 15 or a 30 round magazine.

    none of these weapons require any special permits to buy or own (depending on your location) they are transferred as regular rifles would be and are perfectly legal in most places.

    i have a chinese sks, my recommendation is if you're going to get an sks, do not mess with the aftermarket mags. most folks go through a lot of headaches to get them to work properly.

    my opinion of your neighbors would start with f, and end with "what they think". if they would have problems with an ar15, i suspect they also would with an M1 carbine.

    be aware that not all m1 carbines were us military rifles. universal, and perhaps other brands that i am unaware of used surplus parts and manufactured rifles with them. i think they made some of if not all of the parts for some rifles. i am told that some universals are of good quality, while some others are lacking. i have no experience other than hearsay on this.

    ~john
  3. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    the early univerals were made from "left over " surplus military parts after they ran out . universal had jobbers make the various parts needed to complete the guns. beside universal there was iver johnson and plainfield and now auto ordinance.the companies that made carbines for the military are standard products,inland/gm,winchester,irwin-pederson/saginaw, underwood,national postal meter ,quality hardware, rock-ola. i might have missed one or two. ? be forwarned a complete m1 all original are harder to find. when sent to the armorys after the war they were all stripped down and when put back together very little thought went back into matching parts. since they were all interchangable it's now common to find a winchester receiver with a quality hardware bolt on a rock-ols stock etc....it was mix and match , john is almost correct the 30 carbine rounds though developed for the carbine is more akin to a pistol round than a rifle round. however no one made a 30 cal pistol until ruger in the early 70's ? and amy made a 30 cal auto in that caliber for a short period of time . i think ? :confused:even though surplus ammo has dried up , it's a great gun to shoot lots of fun and damn handy as long as you use good mags and stay away from the after market junk. oh and as for the 30 round mags most on the market are crap. the good ones are m2 mags made for the auto version of the m1
  4. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    more info on 30 caliber carbine handguns A number of handguns have been chambered for .30 Carbine ammunition. In 1944, Smith & Wesson developed a hand-ejector revolver to fire .30 Carbine. It went through 1,232 rounds without incident. From a four-inch (102 mm) barrel, it launched the standard GI ball projectile at 1,277 ft/s (389 m/s), producing a large average group of 4.18 inches (106 mm) at 25 yards (23 m); the military decided not to adopt the revolver. The loud blast is the most oft-mentioned characteristic of the .30 M1 Carbine cartridge fired in a handgun.[5]

    In 1958, the short-lived J. Kimball Arms Co. produced a .30 Carbine caliber pistol that closely resembled a slightly scaled-up High Standard Field King .22 target pistol. The Ruger Blackhawk revolver chambered for the .30 Carbine round has been in the catalogs since the late 1960s. Standard government-issue rounds clock over 1,500 feet per second (460 m/s), with factory loads and handloads producing similar velocities. Other handguns chambered for this cartridge include the Thompson Center Contender and the AMT AutoMag
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