Colt dumping old series 80 new in the box guns on market?

Discussion in 'The 1911 Forum' started by glocknut, May 22, 2009.

  1. DCOhio

    DCOhio New Member

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    Thanks,
    Yes fit and finish from a gun made 35 years ago is excellent ( as is my 1972 Python I had MagnaPorted back then), but, I'd not use it as a carry gun. Big and as stated too many sharp spots like the sights. It is the best shooting handgun I own. I don't own a series 80 Gold Cup or anything newer so can't compare.
    Thanks for info on the bushing. My fingers are fine after 35 years. Have no idea how many rounds?
    Shooter45, So are the regular bushings 'drop in'? and, is a newer match bushing 'fingered' and do they need to be fitted. As I stated, I THOUGHT that new bushing in 70's was part of accuracy increase, is that true or not. I have shot it against regular government models and they simply could not match the accuracy.

    Hogger, the cut'n paste made you sound like an expert! :>)

    Have not shot against any newer types like Kimber, Springfield , Dan Wesson, etc. I like all-metal guns so don't own a half'n'half of any type.
    If you duct tape a broom stick to a Glock.....can you use it for a tomatoe stake? :>)

    I am looking at several compacts now for CC ,thinking of buying ,and researching. All I'm looking at are stainless or stainless/alum frames. No blue. Para, Kimber, Springfield, Colt, etc. I'm LOVIN' that Kimber short 3" but wow! the prices on all these. C'mon!
    D.
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
  2. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    A standard barrel bushing will drop in but a NM bushing will have to be hand fitted and it is not a collet bushing.

    The collet bushing did add to the accuracy of the Series 70 Gold Cup. It worked well for the mass produced 1911 but fitted bushings are much better but more expensive due to time involved.
  3. DCOhio

    DCOhio New Member

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    Shooter45,
    Do you by any chance have a picture of a series 70 type fingered bushing from a Gold Cup next to a newer Nat. Match bushing?
    D.
  4. Oldeyes

    Oldeyes Member

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    As Shooter45 indicated the standard (AKA 'GI") barrel bushings are pretty much drop in and go. The problem with that no muss no fuss drop in approach is that you often end up with no better than standard GI 1911 accuracy. The drop in solid bushings work great from a reliability standpoint, but they are not nearly the most accurate way to go.

    The solid match / national match barrel bushings are typically provided with the external (bushing to slide) dimension over sized and the internal (barrel to bushing) dimension also over sized. Of the couple of match style bushings that I have done, it generally takes a couple of hours of pretty slow hand work working with just very, very, very fine emery paper to do a custom bushing to barrel and slide fit. The Jerry Kuhnhausen book on gunsmithing the 1911 is very highly recommended before you do any substantial work on a 1911. It is a truly superb resource and it pays for itself with the very first 1911 modification that you do.

    One other thing that I will mention while we are on the various 1911 differences topic is that the Colt Gold Cup also has an added small spring in the sear. This added spring is designed to eliminate any potential 'sear bounce' that could cause an AD when the trigger pull is set to light target weight pulls. So, be very careful on a full 1911 disassembly as the little sear spring is not otherwise encountered in any other models and it is indeed tiny.
  5. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    " One other thing that I will mention while we are on the various 1911 differences topic is that the Colt Gold Cup also has an added small spring in the sear. This added spring is designed to eliminate any potential 'sear bounce' that could cause an AD when the trigger pull is set to light target weight pulls. So, be very careful on a full 1911 disassembly as the little sear spring is not otherwise encountered in any other models and it is indeed tiny. "

    Oldeyes, I'm confused about the small spring in the sear comment. I don't remember anything in a Gold Cup like that. Do you have a picture ?
  6. Oldeyes

    Oldeyes Member

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    Shooter45 - The special auxiliary 'bounce reducing' sear spring found on 70 and 80 series Colt Gold Cups is so incredibly minuscule that it is quite easily overlooked and/or lost. Thanks to my son, I do not currently have a Gold Cup on hand to disassemble for a picture, but I did find a superb blow up diagram of the sear assembly on the M1911.org forum. Go to http://www.m1911.org/full_technic.htm and select the "Special Sear Parts in Gold Cups" link selection about half way down the page for the diagram. Enjoy.
  7. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    Thanks. I have those parts in my junk bin and was wondering where they came from. I reworked a series 80 Gold Cup several years ago and replaced all the trigger/sear group with aftermarket parts and never noticed that spring. But after the build was done, they weren't needed anyway. I will file that info in my memory bank. :)

    Again, thanks.
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