Colt Single Action Army Revolvers

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Lead Lobber, Jun 15, 2008.

  1. Lead Lobber

    Lead Lobber Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2007
    Messages:
    965
    Location:
    Central California coastal area
    U.S. Firearms has taken up the challenge to re-produce this venerable weapon, working in the original Connecticut facility, which is supposed to house all historical records.

    I believe they are on the right track - BUT -

    I recently received a 4 3/4" with extra fancy English walnut grips, after getting a call from the sales manager, saying that one piece grips were inadvertantly installed, and would I take it as is? .....

    To make a long story a little less cumbersome, I said, "Sure"!

    A little back ground may enlighten the masses here, so, here goes.

    Advertised as the best SAA reproduction, I was surprised to see the weapon I ordered suffered the same malidy as the genuine Colt I purchased about 10 years ago: Grotesque Grips - too thick to allow accurate pointing (aiming).

    Unless you ask you oppenent to break right, so the point of aim will strike center mass. Yeah, right!

    Ok, ok, ok. This is a short review on my first (I have more on order :eek:) U.S. Firearms purchase.

    Internals - lockup (full cock) is excellent - can't wait to shoot it.

    Finish - Ho Hum. It does not resemble my 3rd generation CSAA. The blueing is dull compared to the older Colts.

    The other big miss is the final finish on the components. They brag a lot about their computer genertated parts, and so on, but they miss the final assembly.

    Compared to my real Colt, this reproduction misses on final finish big time - they forgot to round over sharp metal edges.

    Every edge is way too sharp! How could they miss this detail if they want to produce accurate historical replicas? Can you say "round over"?

    Yeah, buff those sharp edges. Get a real Colt and duplicate it.
  2. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,602
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    Lead Lobber:

    Several years ago I bought a Uberti SSA that was suppose to be one of the most accurate clones of the Colt SAA ever made. It had authentic roll marks and the Uberti roll marks were hiden from initial view. While it was a step above other clones I had seen, it too didn't quite reach Colt standards.

    The edges were sharp, as was your U.S Firearms clone. The finish was not up to Colt Standards of old. The timing was not perfect. The trigger needed a good trigger job. And it shot to one side that nothing short or over rotation of the barrel to the frame solved. While not as expensive as your U.S Firearms clone, it too failed to match a real Colt.

    But it shoots fine as I am sure yours does. I only wanted a clone and paid only for a clone. If I really wanted a collectable Colt with all the finish glitz of a real Colt then I would have bought a real Colt and been pounds lighter in the wallet. I only know that U.S Firearms clones are not inexpensive and with your input I also know they are not worth the price. A good Italian clone probably is good enough for 99% of us out here for significantly less money. High US labor costs is the price of doing business today with US firms. Plus the real talented artisans of the firearms business no longer exist. Anything approaching typical Colt quality of 100 years ago or even 50 years ago made in America today is so high priced as to be out of the realm of the average American shooter as to be ridicules. Computer generated parts and pieces will not replace an artisan polishing job on a firearm! So we have to compromise I guess.

    LDBennett
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