CZ Compact .40 vs. CZ P-06

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by wookie810, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. wookie810

    wookie810 New Member

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    Jan 7, 2008
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    Michigan
    Alright this question has probably been asked many times before, but I like to be as informed as possible about any product before purchasing. Especially when I am going to be dropping a couple hundred bucks. I realize they are basically the same gun with a few distinct differences. Obviously the 06 weights less. This will be my first CZ so I have a few general questions too. Does the de-cocker mean that it doesn't have a safety? The compact .40 has ambi-safety does this mean you can't get say Crimson Trace grips? I noticed on a few pictures of 06's they had them. And the biggest question the rate of twist (something I don't fully understand as it relates to performance.) The 06's rate is 1:9.7 whereas the compact .40 is 1:16. I guess I would figure one is more accurate??? And one thing in general that I have heard is that CZ's have a bad trigger pull? How hard is it to remedy this, and how hard is it to find a gunsmith to do so? Any imput would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  2. JohnK3

    JohnK3 New Member

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    Don't know about the CZ P-06, but my wife's CZ-75BD with decocker doesn't have a safety. The theory is, that with the decocker, it doesn't need one.
  3. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    "Obviously the 06 weights less."

    The P06 has an aluminum frame while the CZ Compact is like all other CZ75's in that it is all steel. Steel guns will out last plastic and aluminum framed guns. You may not find this out but your kids or grandkids might, unless you shoot a whole lot.


    "And the biggest question the rate of twist (something I don't fully understand as it relates to performance.) The 06's rate is 1:9.7 whereas the compact .40 is 1:16. I guess I would figure one is more accurate???"


    Barrel twist is required for the bullet to stabilize in flight. It is like throwing a foot ball without it spinning. No spin and it wobbles. Same thing happens to bullets except if the spin rate is wrong (too slow of a rotational spin rate) it will wobble.

    The determining dimensions of the bullet are its diameter (0.400 inches in the case of 40S&W) and the bullet's length. Heavier bullet of the same caliber are longer. Longer bullets have to spin faster to remain stable. So in this case the the 1 revolution spin in 9.7 inches is a faster spin and it can shoot heavier bullets than the 1 revolution in 16 inches. The Greenhill formula will tell you what that means but the Speer manual has loads for a 180 grain bullet in 40 caliber shot with a 1 in 16 inch twist. Since the heaviest bullet I've seen in 10mm or 40 cal is 200 grains I think there is little advantage to the faster twist. In fact Greenhill say the longer bullet only requires 1 revolution in 38 inches. There is no problem with over spinning the bullet unless the bullet flys apart from the rotational centrifugal forces. That's probably not the case for either of these twist rates (??) with available bullets. Accuracy is not gained by excessive spin rates but lost if the spin rate falls below Greenhills calculated minimum spin rate. I think either of these spin rates are fine and I actually think the 1 in 9.7 inches might be a misprint (??) as 1 in 16 inches I think is pretty much standard for 40S&W.

    "And one thing in general that I have heard is that CZ's have a bad trigger pull? How hard is it to remedy this, and how hard is it to find a gunsmith to do so?"

    CZ don't have bad triggers. They are tactical weapons (personal defense) and are designed safe. They have some creep which is safe engagement of the sear and hammer. The sear/hammer engagement angles are such that the hammer will not easily fall out of engagement if the weapon is dropped or bumped. For the average guy the trigger is best if left alone.

    If you are shooting paper exclusively (that's hard to believe as why would you pick a carry gun to just shoot at paper?) then a trigger job by a competent gunsmith would be nice. If you are using the gun for personal defense then you had better leave the trigger alone as juries frown on any modification to a gun in cases where you might have to shoot a burglar or a mugger. The family of the dead perpetrator MAY decide to sue you so you can not be too careful about what you do to the gun.

    Trigger jobs are not a big deal for a competent gunsmith that knows CZ's but it will never be a "target trigger" as the design does not allow it to be modified to get to that point.

    On the other questions you'll have to wait for others to answer them as I know nothing about them.

    LDBennett
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2008
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