Design for Daily Carry and Self Defense

Discussion in 'Knives & Edged Items' started by IShootBack, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. IShootBack

    IShootBack Active Member

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    We all have a favorite pocket knife that we carry as a tool for various tasks. I think about a butchers knife set and see each knife has a specific purpose. No one knife is suitable for all meat cutting situations.

    I have carried a tanto point knife for years thinking it's probably the best design for personal defense. After doing some research and study I find it is not. Just like the butcher's knife set, some designs are better than others for this purpose.

    Sure, any knife is better than none. Consider simple physics - which would more easily penetrate if using a thrusting motion or cut best with a slashing motion:

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  2. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Back before guns, when the only self defense weapon you had was a blade, Dirks, and Daggers were the weapons of choice. Sure they had butcher knives, but that wasn't what they carried. They were made for cutting, and slashing, but we can't carry them today, they have been outlawed in all states that I know of.
  3. IShootBack

    IShootBack Active Member

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    So what kind of pocket knife do you carry?
  4. redworm

    redworm New Member

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    I vote for #3, clip point. I would want to carry what jim bowie an the pioneers did. If I were stabbing someone in the back to steal their poke, I'm thinking dagger........Just one mans opinion.......Redworm........
  5. carver

    carver Moderator

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    An Applegate/Fairbairn first edition.

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  6. redworm

    redworm New Member

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    Good point Carver, its obvious that I lack reading skills. I have several lockbacks. My two favorites are a Howard Viele spyderco an assisted opening Osbourne Benchmade........Both great knifes........Redworm.......
  7. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Welcome to the forum. Spyderco, and Benchmade knives are good knives. The problem that I have here in TX, and surrounding states is the blade lengths that are legal. I love my Bowies, but I can't carry them.
  8. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Active Member

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    The real, original Bowie knife was actually a large butcher's knife. It didn't have the clip-point blade.
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  9. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Yeah, the original was just a do it all knife. I only threw the Bowies in due to the fact that here in TX I can't carry one, nor can I have one in my vehicle.
  10. mjp28

    mjp28 Well-Known Member

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    I have 5 of those pictured in my desk drawers, and some not pictured.

    The #3 comes in handy.
  11. IShootBack

    IShootBack Active Member

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    Very nice. I understand later versions were not as good.
  12. 3/2 STA SS

    3/2 STA SS Active Member

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    My Pro Tech Godfather has blade design #3 and was able to thrust it right through a level 2 kevlar vest that was being retired. 4 inch blade as well.
  13. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    #1 would be my choice

    #2 should slash well. Point is too high for a good stab.

    #3 should slash okay, although not as well as #2. Point is too high for a good stab – it should be in the center of the blade, in line with your wrist as you thrust – and is too small. Very good chance of breaking your tip off. And why bother with the false edge? A false edge is to allow the top of the knife to cut, to make a stab penetrate easier. With the point that high – above the false edge – on a stab the true edge of the tip would be doing the cutting. Looks wicked as hell, though, don’t it? Should sell good.

    #4 looks to be a pointed knife sharpened on one side. It should stab better than #1, but there is not as much curve to the belly, and it should not slash as well.

    #5 has many advantages. It is pointed and the point is centered – good stab. It is curved – good slash. It is double-edged – slash in both directions and stab easier as it cuts to make the hole, instead of tearing. If I were carrying a knife simply as a weapon, this would be the one.

    #6 would be the best for stabbing, but it has no curve at all, so it would suck for slashing. And that needle point stands a very good chance of breaking or bending.

    #7 should work good for cutting meat, but as a point it has nothing – worthless for stabbing – and there is very little curve to the blade – bad for slashing.

    #s 8a & b cool looking, and when you add that these are the “authentic Japanese Samurai-designed Tanto knife blades”, they should sell great. If you are trying to stab through someone’s bamboo armor, they should be fine. Otherwise they are worthless. With that blade shape, they have all of the problems of trying to cut with a razor blade, but they are not razor sharp.

    #s 9 & 10 good “work” knives, but for defense – not so hot. 9 has no point to speak of, and while 10 does, it is too low and the edge is on the wrong side. Neither would slash well.

    #s 11 & 12 fine for cutting meat. Better for cutting blubber. If sharp, in the hands of someone used to it, 12 should be able to do some serious slashing damage, but neither would stab worth a flip.

    So – #5 if I wanted strictly a weapon. #1 if I wanted a knife.
  14. carver

    carver Moderator

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    And they were a lot cheaper too! Maybe that's the reason they were not as good. Back when I bought mine these knives were selling for around $200 each. I paid $165 for mine. Now the new knives are selling for around $90.
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
  15. GunnyGene

    GunnyGene New Member

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    When I was stationed in Japan, I'd haunt the Iwakuni Castle museum whenever I could, where many of the ancient weapons and armor are displayed. Tanto is actually not a particular blade design, but rather translates as "short sword".

    Concerning the "Tanto" style we're familiar with today, compared to the several different tanto styles developed in different periods, and by different craftsmen, you'll notice that not all of them had the same point design or blade shape. Many had a slightly curved blade, and/or an entirely different point, or even the cutting edge on what we would think of as the spine of the blade.

    The old ones were usually purpose made for a particular person according to his intended use. Modern "tanto" styles are normally mass produced, and therefore compromises must be made.

    Interesting discussion. :)
  16. cpttango30

    cpttango30 Guest

    Depends on how you are going to deploy it. If you are close in and and using a thrusting motion 4, 5, 6 are your best bet.

    My daily carry is a Spyderco Delica 4 or a Kershaw Leek.

    If you know how to deploy it the Karambit is a quick and very deadly knife in a knife fight. The blade is curved and if sharp one slice to the midsection could spill the attackers guts all over his feet.

    Tango what the heck is a Karambit? http://www.coldsteel.com/Product/49KS/STEEL_TIGER.aspx

    I am huge NON-fan of clip points. The points on these blade are very weak. Hit something solid and they can break.
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 3, 2013
  17. IShootBack

    IShootBack Active Member

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    Top is my daily carry folder while at work. It's a Browning my oldest son gave me about 15 years ago for Christmas. Holds a razor edge. Has enormous sentimental value.

    Bottom folder is carried at all other times. A CRKT Hissatsu. Holds a razor edge and never ever cuts anything not seriously needing to be cut.

    2013-03-06_14-35-29_20.jpg
  18. jstgsn

    jstgsn Well-Known Member

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    Here are my picks for everyday carry. For self defense I use a cold steel sword cane or a gun. :)
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  19. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Stopped by the local Flea Market today, couldn't pass this one up for $20! See post #5. It's a Rex Applegate Combat Folder. Model: 45780. Overall Length: 10.06", Length of Blade: 4.48", Weight: 7.4 oz.

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  20. frow blucher

    frow blucher Member

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    that's a heck of a bargain for such a great knife Carver. Wish I could find something like that for $20. I currently use the CRKT Foresight for EDC, and sometimes carry my trusty old Buck 110 (33 yrs old), or a small Kershaw Chive. Love them all. Sharp as h*ll, all of them.
    That $20 knife you have is the bargain of the day, I think.
    fb
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Knives & Edged Items Secondary Daily Carry Dec 22, 2011