Dino Longuiera's Speed Strip Kit for the Ruger Mk II...

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by B27, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. B27

    B27 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    Messages:
    415
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  2. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,400
    A neat solution to a non-problem.

    Jim
  3. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,241
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    I was gonna say the very same thing jim. I never have had an issue stripping down a ruger mark or standard and can do it fairly quickly.
  4. B27

    B27 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    Messages:
    415
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Jim-
    Point taken if you use your pistol for more informal uses, as the huge majority admittedly do.:)

    But everytime you remove that receiver from the grip frame you increase the tolerances between those two assemblies.
    Again, this matters not at all to the huge majority of shooters.

    But it did matter to the US Army Pistol Team back when they practiced with MkIIs and that is why they installed Dino's neat litttle gizmo.

    Also, on MkIIs with serious target grips like these Nills-

    [​IMG]

    -the backstrap area of the gun is covered by the grip.

    Dino's gizmo serves well here too.

    But like I said, you are completely correct in that this is a solution to a nonproblem for the great majority of MkII shooters.
  5. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,400
    Good point on the grips. But what does using the original takedown have to do with removing the receiver from the grip frame? With either takedown, you can remove the bolt for routine cleaning without removing the receiver from the frame, and I generally recommend not doing so.

    Jim
  6. B27

    B27 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    Messages:
    415
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    And wise you are to reccomend not separating the receiver and grip frame! :)
    But I have yet to stand by and watch someone new to disassembling a MKII for cleaning that did not at some point start banging it on or with something to separate those two assemblies.

    I'm not saying it makes sense, I'm just saying that huge numbers of shooters consider a plastic or brass faced hammer to be an integral part of their MkII tool kit. :D
  7. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,308
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    The tough part of the Ruger MK series takedown is not the takedown at all but the re-assembly. Getting the hammer strut in the right place while closing the latch on the removable hammer spring assembly requires holding the gun in exactly the right attitude. It will go back together wrong and then you can not pull the bolt back at all.

    This device allow the bolt to be removed without having to remove the hammer spring assembly. But doing it that way blocks the internals to the frame and keeps them from being cleaned adequately, in my opinion.

    I take mine all the way down every time I shoot it after every range session. The fit of the barrel assembly to the receiver is still tight after all these decades and it takes a rubber hammer to separate the two. But every time I re-assemble the gun it seems I get it wrong at least once or twice before I get it right regardless that I know the procedure well and have done it many times.

    I much prefer the takedown of the Button and Lever takedown High Standards. The Lever version is the easiest. The Button version needs an impact or a heavy push to break it loose after it has been fired but the Lever version is easy to operate, quickly releases the barrel, and the barrel assembly slides off the frame effortlessly.

    LDBennett