Do I need to FL size my new brass?

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by jdon72, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. jdon72

    jdon72 New Member

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    Just received my new brass of win 30-06 and am planning on FL sizing the new brass to be safe, but is it necessary? I have always used reloads and had to FL my brass, but this is my first experience with new brass.

    Thanks

    J
  2. REISINGMOD50

    REISINGMOD50 New Member

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    Generally no. The reason that used brass is re-sized is that the heat generated when firing the round expands the case. New brass should not need to be re-sized as it has not been fired and expanded.
  3. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    I always do, I have yet to find new brass with the case mouths not dinged and out of round. Put the brass on a reloading block at look at the mouths I bet you see a few.
  4. res45

    res45 Member

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    I always resize my new brass just to make sure the necks are straight and correctly sized for the bullet I'm using. I use a lot of the same brass for bolt,pump and auto loaders I like to make sure all my brass is the same to start with.
  5. jdon72

    jdon72 New Member

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    312 that was the first thing i noticed, but even though the mouth is dinged a little, it should still take the bullet and straighten it out. Right???

    Thanks guys for the input, Any others not FL resize and just use the brass as is.?
  6. madmantrapper

    madmantrapper New Member

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    I don't think using a lead bullet to swage the neck is a good idea. I always full length resize new and used unless it is going back into the same chamber, then neck size.
  7. madmantrapper

    madmantrapper New Member

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    Why is this an issue for you?
  8. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    I would recommend resizing it with your dies. Your die and expander ball size the case neck and mouth to apply CORRECT bullet tension to the seated bullet. Simply counting on a bullet forcing the case mouth and neck back to .30 is just not a good idea, among many other things, tension on your bullet affects chamber pressure and bullet pull when fired. In this case with an oval shaped neck and mouth you are applying too much tension on two sides of the bullet and almost none on the other two sides, your throwing your accuracy into the trash, what a waste of your time! I say do things by the book when reloading, its not worth cutting corners.
  9. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Im with 312 on this one. Solid advice brother;)
  10. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    I always FL size new brass. Not only to straighten out any dinged necks, but also to check the OAL to make sure that that is in spec too.
    This has been a one-time deal for me...but I did have a lot of new Remington .25-06 brass that was about .005" over the max length spec about 15 years back. That could have made for some hairy handloads! The only reason I noticed it was the first bullet I seated in this lot was WAY overcrimped (I only adjust that die set for one rifle so the lock ring never moves so I knew it wasn't a misadjustment problem).
    I reported that lot # to Remington and they reimbursed me for the brass (I still used it anyway after they were trimmed except for the three samples I mailed to them). After that I starting checking every bag/box I buy.

    Generally, you won't be sizing the case much at all if they were formed correctly...mainly just bumping the shoulder and sizing the neck to allow for correct bullet tension (as 312 already mentioned) and straightening out any dings.
    If you don't fix those dings, you could fold the neck if the bullet doesn't push it out where it is supposed to be.
  11. jdon72

    jdon72 New Member

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    Ok guys thanks for the input...All the replies just confirms to FL the new brass. I read on some reviews of the brass(customer reviews on how they liked the product) that they used it straight from the bag.

    312-I had never used new brass and was wondering if FL sizing is nesssary thinking that this is the same brass that they (winchester) would load their bullets with.

    Just to be correct and as my thoughts and yours...don't skip a step and stay consistent to get accurate and safe results.

    Thanks

    Jeff
  12. flintlock

    flintlock Well-Known Member

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    I've always resized new brass and then checked the case length, sometimes it does need trimming. You want consistent length for good loads.
  13. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    I de-burr the case mouths first, then FL size the new brass as part of regular progressive reloading with my Dillon RL550B. I find new brass always has some dinged case mouths. I have never found any new cases to be beyond the MAX trim length but I suppose it is possible (??).

    I start every new cartridge I reload for with 200 to 500 new cases, reload them until they are worn out and then buy another 200 to 500 new cases. I do use once fired cases for some cartridges but not normally.

    LDBennett
  14. Freebore

    Freebore New Member

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    SOP for new brass (for me) is to FL resize, trim to correct length (if needed), and de-burr the flash hole.

    I recently picked up 120 new 8X57 Remington cases and found about 10% to be longer than the specified OAL. Some of the necks were dented and nicked, and most all had rough flash holes (some even off center).

    I believe that with higher production demands, quality is now taking second place, so its up to the reloader to be the final quality inspector.
  15. jdon72

    jdon72 New Member

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    Thanks guys...all good advice.
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