Does anyone else get way to wrapped up in their guns?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by fleetwood1976, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. fleetwood1976

    fleetwood1976 Active Member

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    I have this gun on another post but i will use it as an example. First off there is the military history of being a brazilian contract. I appreciate the history this gun has seen. It is my 1st N frame smith, so it is iconic to me. It shoots a 45 acp round with moon clips, how cool is that. The grips I found online for $10. They were made for or by a Florida Deputy Sherrif. great quaility and workmanship, but homemade and not in demand. The grips are as historically neet as the gun. Its like the saying "If walls could talk." I would love to know what my vintage firearms have seen and been through. I guess what I am trying to say is that I see a tremendous amount of character and attitude and style in a gun, where other people see a 1917 DA 45 Brazilian contract Smith and Wesson. $350 to $500. I guess I get way to sentimental about some of the guns in my collection.

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  2. mrkirker

    mrkirker New Member

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    Fleetwood, you listen and hear whispers of 'what was'. Many wonder 'if this could talk'. Its one of the more enjoyable facets of 'firearm owner-ship'.
  3. johnmpeters

    johnmpeters New Member

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    Kirker said it beautifully. I'm always intrigued by the idividual history of an item, especially when it's a firearm. By the way, thats a fine pistol. I absolutely love a revolver in 45acp.
  4. cakes

    cakes New Member

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    If that gun could talk, it would probably tell you to stop shooting Wolf ammo.

    Just pulling your chain. Nice gun. I like those grips.
  5. fleetwood1976

    fleetwood1976 Active Member

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    Everybody gives me grief about wolf ammo. I don't reload, It is cheeper and I clean my guns after every outing so I don't have a problem with the residue. I try to stay away from using it in semi autos if I can avoid it. Besides, the dirtiest ammo I ever shot was Winchester super X bulk 22lr's. I don't depend on it for accuracy either. It is mainly for plinking and messing around.
  6. Maximilian II

    Maximilian II New Member

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    Fleetwood, I once bought an Enfield for $65 just because of the WWII markings, just assumed it might shoot. Didn't care if it wouldn't. It just "spoke" to me.
    It shoots better than I do....
    Apparently it has some memories I wasn't there for.
  7. TCoggins

    TCoggins Member

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    I feel the same way. I have a few Mosin Nagants, which are very inexpensive to own and shoot. When people suggest I sporterize them, or mount a scope, I get upset. There's a lot of history that could be destroyed if that happened.

    I also have an FN 1922 (Browning design), in .380. Based on the markings and serial number, I have estimated its manufacture date around 1926-1930. It has also spent time in either the Dutch Military or Dutch police.

    Your Smith is awesome.

    Tim
  8. fleetwood1976

    fleetwood1976 Active Member

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    Those mosin nagant rifles are spell binding. i picked up one for steak dinner price at an auction. I find myself many an evening investigating the proof marks. It was a 1941 finnish capture 91-30 that was reworked to accept the D-166 round. It was Izhesvk complete numbers matching. So far all that I have found out is interesting but does not make it worth anymore. I got my eye on a model 44 at a pawnshop. It is newer and laminate stock. My 91-30 needs a little brother.
  9. vulcrider

    vulcrider Member

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    i don't know if we get too sentimental about our guns. Some of us buy and sell guns the same way a used car dealer buys and sells automobiles...just a commodity to make money. Their choice and gives some of us a chance to own something that we may not normally get the opportunity for. Some of us buy guns for their brand, function, style, capability, etc. But, after watching the Barrett-Jackson auction this week, I took a different attitude towards the guns I own and hope to own. Most of the cars I saw going across the block, perfectly restored, matching numbers, paint better than original, although beautiful (and I wouldn't mind having a 1970 Boss 302 or a 1971 hemi 'Cuda convertible!) just seemed to have lost that connection that we associate with a gun. Where's the history, the personal attention, the things that make a gun unique to the person that owned it? A gun is one of the few tools in man's history that is a true extension of themselves, whether in how its used, what it was used for or just how it feels as a part of them.
    Don't get me wrong, the people who collect fine things (cars, paintings, women!?) aren't doing anything negative, but a gun that Grandpa used to get his first deer as a boy, an M1 that helped win a war, or even a gun used infamously all have a curious emotional attachment that we all appreciate.
    Don't think we can ever be too sentimental/emotional about our firearms.
  10. Trouble 45-70

    Trouble 45-70 New Member

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    19xxx rang. Fun to shoot, looks about the same condition, bore good original stocks. Located by my elbow. Like your grips.

    Yes I am emotionally attached to most of my firearms. Why not? I'm emotionally attached to that last pot of chili I made too.
  11. LurpyGeek

    LurpyGeek Active Member

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    Yes. Next question?
  12. topper

    topper New Member

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    Being passionate about firearms is, IMO, only natural. After all, it is a symbol of power and an instrument of precision craftsmanship. What more could a person ask for?
  13. james56

    james56 New Member

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    Fleetwood this one spoke to me it's a 1917 US Army and has WWI history along with being carried by the Police Cheif of Travis MI. P. D. and then he also carried it as Police Cheif of Lakeland Fl. P.D He had it Reblued by S&W in 1979 and he had it letterd by Mr.R.Jinks S&W Historian. I replaced the original Grips with the Ivories and a Tyler T Grip Adaptor.
    the other one with stags I bought real cheap online live auction @ Proxiebid.com that was fun. The reblue was fine, except for blue the trigger and hammer (a no-no) (not S&W) But was over polished. It is a great shooter for the price. Hope you enjoy yours as I do mine.
    james56 S&WCA

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    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
  14. Gabob

    Gabob Well-Known Member

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    I have several old military weapons that I wish could talk. One is a US Model 1816 musket. Also a revolver with a notch filed in the grip. Bet that one has an interesting history
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