Double trigger Tranter

Discussion in 'General Military Arms & History Forum' started by TranterUK, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    The reason I use the Tranter name is that its an old English gun company I once worked for. William Tranter himself made guns from the 1850s and one of the most innovative might interest some of you. The double trigger revolver.

    The lower trigger cocks the action and the upper drops the hammer. So for single action fire, pull the lower only, then the upper when ready. For double action rapid fire, just pull both together.

    It sounds a lot harder than it is. H&K even adopted the principle for their P7 with a squeeze cocking front strap. Hm.

    The British percussion revolvers of the period were more robust than the American ones, note the sold frame and barrel. Also the thoughtful hump at the top of the backstrap to stop the weapon riding up. Just thought it might be of interest..

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2009
  2. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Sure would love to own one of those! Interesting, very interesting! Is this one yours?
    Now we know were you get your fourm name from.

    I chose carver years ago, because it is another of my hobbies. Don't do much carving these days though, folks just don't want to pay for the work!

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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009
  3. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Nice work carver, I wish I could carve, but wood seems to hate me. Its not my revolver, though I have had a couple pass through my hands over the years and have fired them a few times. :)

    Its surprisingly easy to get used to the system.
  4. Those revolvers were normally in .44 caliber, weren't they Tranter?
  5. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Indeed Pistol. They were mostly 54 bore, which is about .45". Some are 38 bore which is .50". There are some down to 80 bore which I think is around .30".

    I have fired originals in both 54 and 38 bore and they are, as you Americans might say, a hoot!

    Notice the loading lever alongside the barrel, unlike the American system where they are under the barrel. Also for anyone interested, that A shape thing on the frame is a hammer rest. You can pull the hammer back a tad, push the top bit into the frame and let the hammer forward. It will rest on the device, so putting no pressure on a cap. When you pull the trigger it just spings out of the way.

    I love this stuff!!
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2009
  6. b.goforth

    b.goforth New Member

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    william tanter was also the developer of the double action mechanism
    (seperate single action sear) that was used on early iver johnson, H&R and some others american firearms. it was the action that iver johnson and andrew fyrberg used when developing the "hammer the hammer" action known today as the transfer bar ignition system. there is a subchapter in my iver johnson book on this action (chapter 3.7) along with copies of tanter english patent.

    the double trigger tanter shown above was just one of william tanter's many designs both percussion and cartridge.
    bill
  7. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Yes he was quite the firearm maker. Here's one of his later military centre fires. You would be well armed with one of these...

    A quick way of spotting a Tranter is the bump on the back of the trigger. It trips the hammer.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2009
  8. Enfield

    Enfield New Member

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    I have to agree with you Tranter, they are superb quality weapons with lots of interesting design features. Was it the Tranter that had a little gear wheel on the loading lever that conected with teeth that drove the rod into the chambers ? I am sure friend had this arangement on arevolving rifle once

    Funny enough I have just finished refurbishing a Tranter mould for a friend, strange it was all there but the hinge pin was missing - made another one press fit into the lower half of the mould and it is now as good as new.

    Cheers

    Enfield
  9. noslolo

    noslolo New Member

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    Another great post Tranter!! I love this site, I always learn so much.
  10. BBQ

    BBQ New Member

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    Here is my double trigger Tranter. It is a cartridge model built on the frame of an earlier percussion pistol, but apparently not retrofit to be a cartridge. I have seen no other one like it. I finally figured out how the extractor is supposed to work and got it unjammed so it indeed is functional. This gun is in great shape, though little bluing is left. I have no idea how my dad got it, but he had it already when I was born. I'm 58.
    I live in Georgia USA, and would appreciate any insight or feedback. Thanks

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2010
  11. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    Hey BBQ, welcome to the forum. That is a good looking revolver, though kind of weird.

    What part of Georgia are you from, I live in Madison County.
  12. RJay

    RJay Active Member

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    TranterUK now has his own forum, Firearms Round Table http://thefirearmsroundtable.com/index.php
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2011
  13. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Tranter was not the only one to use that system. Kynoch used it on Schlund patent cartridge revolvers, c. 1886. There apparently was some association between Tranter and Kynoch. The Kynoch revolvers are marked on the top of the barrel KYNOCH GUN FACTORY ASTON while Tranter's factory was nearby at Aston Cross. This example has the additional marking PATENT MODEL on the top strap.

    In any case, the double trigger design is clever, and Schlund managed to get both triggers inside the trigger guard. It is not a true double action; like the Tranter and the American Starr, it is a trigger cocker. The bottom trigger cocks the conceald hammer, then pressing the top trigger releases the hammer to fire the revolver. Pulling both together with two fingers simulates double action. The lower trigger contains a catch that can be pulled down to uncock the revolver if it is cocked but then not to be fired. The spur at the rear above the grip is pulled down to "break" the revolver.

    Kynoch revolvers were made in three sizes, No. 1 for cartridges like the .476 and .450, No. 2 for .380 and .320, and No. 3 for .300 and .297-.230. The one shown is a No. 2.

    Before someone says it, no the gun is not the famous Diamancea, which was an entirely different revolver, using a striker type firing mechanism instead of the concealed hammer of the Kynoch. There is enough resemblance that there may be a connection with Tranter/Kynoch, but if so it is unproven.

    Just FWIW, I have fired this Kynoch; it looks awkward, but in fact is quite easy to shoot in either mode of operation, and becomes familiar quickly.

    Jim

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  14. Bill Akins

    Bill Akins New Member

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    In the western movie "Hannie Caulder" Raquel Welch used the dual trigger, spurless hammer, Tranter percussion revolver. You can read about it at this link....
    http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/Talk:Hannie_Caulder

    and here's a pic of Raquel with the dual trigger Tranter. I know, I know, many will say "there's a revolver in the pic?" Lol.

    [​IMG]

    I enlarged the Tranter from the above pic and rotated it so you can see it better. Looks to be a cartridge model or cartridge conversion because I don't see any nipples (on the gun guys, on the gun, Lol) on the cylinder and the barrel side mounted loading lever appears to be missing also.

    [​IMG]


    .
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2011
  15. Bill Akins

    Bill Akins New Member

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    Even earlier than H&K the lignose einhand semi auto pistol used the same trigger guard front strap cocking system as seen here...

    [​IMG]

    More on the Lignose einhand pistol at this link.....

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Guns/Lignose3/lignose3.html

    Also the Chinese type 77 semi auto pistol uses the Lignose einhand (one hand) cocking system. As seen at this link....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_77_pistol

    .
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