Dry Fire

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Poppypaul, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. Poppypaul

    Poppypaul Member

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    I am relatively new to the forum and to shooting. I have been wondering if it is "proper" to dry fire a firearm. I have read various times that you should not dry fire someone elses firearm unless they specifically tell you that it is OK to do so. Is there a technical functional reason to not dry fire? Does it harm the firearm in any way? I am certainly far from an expert in the inner workings of a firearm but it seems that when a firearm is dry fired it is not doing anything it was not designed to do. In fact it seems that there is less resistance to the operation than when there is a cartridge being discharged. Can someone enlighten me on this?
  2. Bigdog57

    Bigdog57 Member

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    It very much depends upon the particular gun. Rimfires are generally a no-no, due to the firing pin sometimes being able to put a ding in the chamber mouth, that can cause feeding jams.
    Most centerfire guns, it really is of little consequence. We were cautioned to NOT do this with the Czech CZ52 pistol, as it could lead to firing pin breakage.
    Best to use 'snap caps' or an EMPTY brass case.
  3. Grizz

    Grizz Active Member

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    Thanks for clearing that up. I was wondering too
  4. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    If in doubt, use a snap cap. Most arms will tell you in their manual whether you can safely dry fire.

    Dry firing is the second best way to become proficient with your gun. It is quite a bit cheaper than live fire, but is NOT A SUBSTITUTE for practice with live ammunition. Both should be used to become really comfortable and proficient.

    Pops
  5. HunterAlpha1

    HunterAlpha1 Former Guest

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    during, before, and after the Napoleonic wars the British army had the best infantry in the world because they were the only army that practiced and drilled with live ammunition. they could put out more rounds a minute than anyone else, but more importantly, they were able to stand firm despite comrades being shot all around them because they were used to the sounds of gunfire.
  6. reynolds357

    reynolds357 Former Guest

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    Oddly enough, CZ pistols still come with snap caps from the factory.
  7. coachwill

    coachwill Forum Sponsor

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    I dry fire my long rifles at least once a week about 5-10 times before I put a live round down range. I honestly feel that it helps me get in the groove before pulling the trigger during deer season. Also it helps me get a feel for the break in the trigger and I can tell if I am pulling off my aim point with my trigger pull for any reason.

    With my pistol I do the same thing again just to see if I need to adjust my pull any. It helps with muscle memory.
  8. Double Deuce

    Double Deuce New Member

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    I dry fire my guns as well, I dont do it alot and it has not caused any issues, if you want ot play it safe get the snap caps.
  9. howlnmad

    howlnmad Well-Known Member

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    I use old brass that the primer pockets have been filled with silicone. It's cheaper tgan snap caps.
  10. mogunner

    mogunner Well-Known Member

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    My SW40VE has to be fired, or dry-fired in order to remove the slide, so I tend to believe that they designed it to be fine in doing that. As some have said, not a good idea to do rimfires, Better safe than sorry, some expended brass or snap caps certainly won't hurt the firearm and might extend it's service.
  11. grumpy66

    grumpy66 New Member

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    I dry-fire all the time. It helps me maintain a smooth trigger pull.

    Ruger 10/22's are designed to be dry-fired, the firing pin will not contact the breach face.

    Glocks must be dry-fired for disassembly.

    DO NOT dry-fire "cap-and-ball" black powder arms, it will mushroom the nipples.
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