EIBAR Revolver

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by bikerd, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    I have an Eibar revolver dated as a 1927 firearm. It is A 32 cal. revolver.....6shot. It is in fair condition with good original grips of some type of wood It has several markings on it on the main body, cylinder and butt of the stock. I can send pictures if it would help. Just would like to know the approximate value of the gun. The markings are a shield with an X in it which is the Eibar proofmark and standing lions and made in Spain on the body also. On the stock butt it is marked Eibar......1927......cal.32-20....A.G.H.......and the numbers 5258. on the barrel it is marked Cal.32-20 CTG. Any help would be appreciated.
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
  2. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    bikerd,
    Welcome to the forum.
    Spanish made guns (especially revolvers) were/are, in general, copies of some other manufacturer's design, particularly S&W. Values, again in general, are not very high for the run-of-the-mill pieces, although there are some that are "collectible" because of some attribute.
    Detailed close-ups of the markings as well as a full size pic of each side would certainly help in the ID and valuation.
  3. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    i am going to try and send pics

    Attached Files:

  4. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    hopefully these will help
  5. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    there are lion markings and the shield also on the body of the gun
  6. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    That one has kind of a "Colt" look about the frame (except for the lack of a cylinder release lever behind the recoil shield.) I'm guessing that by pulling on the extractor rod, the cylinder is released? or is that a release button on the crane? Does everything work?
    It certainly seems to have some character. It's more than likely a product of the pre-Spanish Civil war era - probably 1925-1935.
    As to value, I'd guess no more than $200 -to a dedicated collector of that type of handgun - probably more in the $150 - $175 range. Let's see what other folks think.
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
  7. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    I have one of those. They are pretty crude firearms, and are not safe to shoot-even in good condition.
    I cut the firing pin off mine, and leave it laying out as a decoy.
  8. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    I have no intentions of shooting it,but everything works.
  9. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    oh yeah.....Jim that is the release button for the cylinder on the crane.
  10. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    Looks like Dan Wesson stole that design. LOL!
  11. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    While some of those guns were of reasonable quality, most were very poorly made of cast iron and are not safe with even standard loads. The .32's were marginally better only because the cylinder usually has thicker walls since the cartridge is smaller.

    I have seen a couple that had blown up, one when a commercial blank was fired.

    Value is minimal. Most gun shops won't even take them on trade because the paper work cost exceeds any profit and the liability risks if they sold the gun are just too hign.

    Jim
  12. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    I am a machinist and know metals well and this is not cast.....just an interesting conversation piece for me....it does have S&W look to it though
  13. bikerd

    bikerd New Member

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    I see you are in PA....I am from upstate NY myself
  14. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    Who?
  15. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Run a Rockwell test on it and cut a small sample out of the inside of the grip for analysis, and let us know what kind of high quality alloy steel it is.

    Jim
  16. 45Auto

    45Auto Active Member

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    An estimate of over $100.00 is rather generous, in my opinion.

    I don't share Jim's opinion as to safety. Each revolver must be checked by a gunsmith and used/not used accordingly.

    The French Govt. issued thousands of these revolvers in WWI in 8mm French caliber. After WWI the French retained many of their Spanish revolvers and continued to issue them.
  17. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Hi, 45Auto,

    Bikerd says he knows metals so he should be more qualified than the aveage gunsmith to determine the quality of that gun. He seems to believe it is of good quality and safe.

    I don't share that opinion.

    Jim
  18. jeeps123

    jeeps123 New Member

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    Hey guys -

    I'm rebuilding a customer's Eibar Temko revolver, and he'd like the firing pin replaced. would anyone care to sell me the firing pin out of his revolver? Or, for some kind of trade, I could send you a firing pin as well.....so that you would have something in there, and not just an empty space....
  19. Lanrezac

    Lanrezac Active Member

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    A) I have never seen or heard of a Temko revolver. Any chance of a picture?

    B) Parts interchangeability on many old (pre-1936) Spanish pistols is poor. They basically put a gun together, then filed away on it until it pretty much worked. The degree of "pretty much" varied with how much they cared about making a good product. If you can find a modern firing pin you can shape to fit, it might not be any more work, and will probably be better steel.

    This is just my opinion. I am a collector, and not a gunsmith.
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
  20. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Those guns all had hammer mounted firing pins. Some were integral with the hammer, but most used the rivet system like S&W and Colt. The firing pins are easy, but tedious, to make out of any piece of steel of suitable thickness.

    To add a bit to Jim Hauff's comment on Spanish use of the S&W design. While those guns look like S&W's and many are such close copies that they fool even experts at any distance at all, the innards are usually closer to Colt, using a rebound lever to operate the hand and trigger return, as well as hammer rebound. Some used a separate rebound lever and mainspring, like Colt, others used a single part which combined the rebound lever with the mainspring, a simple-looking lockwork that required close fitting, not a problem in a manual-labor society.

    Jim
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