estimate on 2 guns

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by Ninja007, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. Ninja007

    Ninja007 New Member

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    Nov 25, 2009
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    I have 2 guns I am looking to sell. can anyone give me a rough estimate of what they are worth.

    1)1939, 7.35 Carcano rifle. It is in good condition. It was given to me by the man who carried it in WWII. The wood is marked but the metal is rust free and in working order. I also have 3 boxes of ammo for it.

    2) Sears and Roebuck, C. Higgins model 58316 bolt action 12 gauge shotgun. Again it is in very good condition.

    Any ball park figure would be appreciated.
  2. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR Active Member

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    Italian Carcano have several variations but the value is pretty consistent. Do you have the bayonet for it? Current value 120.00 in best condition. Bayonets can fetch 75-100 bucks by themselves. The Model 1938 (the only one chambered in 7.35) saw very limited action. Most were seen on the Russian front very early in the war but most were given up for the newer 6.5 Carcano. Most of the 7.35 were sent to Finland for security forces but the Finns hated them and the fixed sights were problematic. Most were ditched for a MN. Any remaining Carcanos were seized by Germany and stored until the 80's were a massive influx of imports hit the US. The chances of this being a bring back from the guy that gave it to you is slim. If it is, I would like to hear his story. : )

    JC higgens SG were made by High Standard 1950's though 1970's. Good condition 150.00-175.00
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2009
  3. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

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    "by the man who carried it in WW II" I don't hardly thnk so, these were Italian Military rifles, I don't think we let any Italian prisoners immigrate with their war weapons.:)
  4. CHUCKEYCITY13

    CHUCKEYCITY13 New Member

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    Maybe the man picked up the Carcano during WWII and sent it home or brought it back as a souvenir. I have a WWII Carcano carbine bring back that my great uncle brought back.
  5. Contenderizer

    Contenderizer New Member

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    Chuckeycity13 may have the correct story on how the Carcano made its way to the US. Many were sent back by GI's just as he suggests - mine included.

    The three boxes of ammo, by the way, if original, are likely worth more than the gun.
  6. MSGT-R

    MSGT-R Active Member

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    Damn! I've had one box left in my bullet box (desicant too) for years! The box is written in Italian (I always thought it was very cool). The rifle has been in the family for as long as I can remember. My Dad didn't serve, but I'm sure he got it from someone that he knew that did.

    Thank you for all that neat info.
  7. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Assuming Ninja007 is in the U.S., the story seems, at best, unlikely. With some exceptions, the only soldiers who carried Carcanos in WWII were Italian, and I agree with others that those brought here as POWs or who immigrated later didn't bring their rifles along.

    Actually, very few American units encountered Italian troops and few Italian weapons were brought back (compared to the tons of German weapons). Most of the Carcanos in the U.S. were imported by the shipload after WWII by outfits like Interarms. (One of those imported Carcanos played a role in the tragedy in Dallas in November, 1963.)

    The 6.5 caliber was not "new" at the start of WWII. It was the old caliber, adopted with the first Mannlicher-Carcano rifle in 1891. By the WWII era, the Italians (like the Japanese) had found the 6.5 inadequate and decided to increase the bullet diameter and weight, hence the 7.35mm. As war loomed, the Italian military had second thoughts and converted most of the 7.35 caliber rifles and carbines back to 6.5 to simplify ammunition supply. The only ones not converted were those that were already out of the country.

    Jim
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