Even more nonsence from the UK

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Marlin T, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. Marlin T

    Marlin T Active Member

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    Knife action

    IN demanding tougher sentences for the perpetrators of knife-related crime, Britain's political leaders have, once again, sought a quick-fix when a more fundamental review is required.


    The need to tackle this country's growing knife culture is self-explanatory following the recent spate of murders, and also growing concerns about the number of pupils attending Yorkshire schools equipped with offensive weapons.

    However, this trend is unlikely to be halted by moves to increase the maximum jail sentence for carrying a knife in public from four to five years. Such tinkering is unlikely to serve as a deterrent when criminals know that the courts are powerless to enforce the strict letter of the law because of the prison overcrowding crisis.

    Yet the political posturing over sentencing policy overlooks the fact that there should be absolutely no need for individuals of whatever age to carry a knife in public unless they are a tradesman.

    Indeed, it is the failure of the police and MPs to recognise this reality which has created a climate where many young people either regard knives as a fashion accessory or as a means of self-defence.

    However, the inevitable consequence of more dangerous weapons being in the public domain is an increased likelihood that they will be used to maim or kill.

    Halting the sale and distribution of knives must, therefore, go hand in hand with tougher sentences.
    Last Updated: 20 March 2007

    http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleID=2133266&SectionID=104
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2007
  2. Lead Lobber

    Lead Lobber Former Guest

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    Marlin T, the "View Gallery" link does not work.

    LL
  3. johnston3407

    johnston3407 New Member

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  4. charagrin

    charagrin Former Guest

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    It makes no sense to outlaw knives in school and yet provide pencils and pencil SHARPENERS.
  5. Bruce FLinch

    Bruce FLinch New Member

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    :eek: Man! Things are more whacky in England than I thought.
  6. Well, it seems to me if they're going to outlaw knives, they need to outlaw hammers, screwdrivers, saws, and razor blades, together any other tool or sharp object that might have the remotest potential for misuse. Let's hope they don't overlook wire and rope while they're at it, lots of effective weapons that can be made of wire or rope. And don't forget to outlaw all household cleaners and other chemicals as well, since those are likely to be poisons. You see that way, all the Brits would be safe while they sit around in squalor, watching their beards grow, their homes and public building fall apart, and their entire economy go to hell in a handbasket. :D
  7. catfish83861

    catfish83861 Active Member

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    Pistol, Don't forget to get rid of those nasty Pianos. You know how dangerous the wire in those things are :eek: . catfish
  8. berto64

    berto64 Active Member

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    Pens & pencils also. Instruments of death everyone of'em if utilized properly.
  9. Marlin T

    Marlin T Active Member

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    catfish you stole my idea, piano wires that is. Of course we might see an increase of murder by falling pianos too.
  10. What the Brits (and the Americans!) really need to do is outlaw the most deadly weapons of all: POLITICIANS and TORT ATTORNEYs. :D
  11. Marlin

    Marlin *TFF Admin Staff Chief Counselor*

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    That's not funny..... But serious and a necessity !!!!!

    It should be a SERIOUS EFFORT to outlaw politicians and, especially, the ENTIRE PLAINTIFF's BAR. :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:
  12. Marlin, as for politicians, that reminds me of a verse I once read by Hilaire Belloc:

    Here richly, with riduculous display,
    The Politician's corpse was laid away.
    While all of his acquaintance sneered and slanged
    I wept, for I had longed to see him hanged.
    :D

    As for the Plaintiff's Bar, I could not agree with you more. You might find these facts interesting, Marlin, though I am certain they will come as no surprise to you:

    The trial lawyers’ industry is sometimes referred to as Trial Lawyers, Inc., a hypothetical corporation, "raking in almost $40 billion in revenues annually – 50% more than Microsoft or Intel and double that of Coca-Cola." (KRC: from Manhattan Institute, Trial Lawyers, Inc., p. 2)

    "Trial Lawyers, Inc.’s revenues have risen to a staggering $46 billion." (Manhattan Institute, Trial Lawyers, Inc. website, August 2005.)

    "Over the past three years for which data are available, the litigation industry’s revenues grew by 11.1 percent annually, as compared with 3.9 percent growth in gross domestic product, 2.22 percent growth in inflation, and a 5.6 percent annual decline in the stock market." (Manhattan Institute, Trial Lawyers, Inc. website, August 2005.)

    "The lawsuit industry’s lack of transparency prevents us from making an accurate profit estimate, but if its margins are as high as we suspect, Trial Lawyers, Inc. might well be the most profitable business in the world." (KRC: Manhattan Institute, Trial Lawyers, Inc., p. 2)

    "The point here is not that these are very rich people. It is that their law firms are even richer—with the depth and agility to field an array of well paid experts, legal strategists, private detectives, jury consultants, and top public relations people. Against such outfits, even the largest corporations can be left feeling intimidated." (KRC: Hantler, "Seven Myths ...", p. 23)

    "This plutocracy of 60,000 plaintiffs’ attorneys is so powerful it can overwhelm the broader interests of industry, workers, municipalities, schools, charities, and individual citizens." (KRC: Hantler, "Seven Myths ...", p.23)

    "The most cherished myth of the trial lawyers is that they are so many Robin Hoods struggling against the armed might of the powerful Sheriff. Examined closely, the trial bar looks less like a tender shepherd boy with a slingshot and more like a band of Goliaths." (KRC: Hantler, "Seven Myths ...", p. 23)
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 22, 2007
  13. Marlin

    Marlin *TFF Admin Staff Chief Counselor*

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    I detest the ALTA and all it stands for.

    That said, however, I have to give them credit in one area. They have the finest and most thorough Continuing Legal Education seminars available, even better than any ABA Law School seminars I've seen. Even though I was exempt by statute from CLE, as were all Jurists, I always felt we should take as much as possible to stay up to date and averaged 42-56 hours credit each year.

    The regular bar was required to have twelve credits a year !!!!!!!!

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