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factory 223 rem rounds

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Evins74s, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. Evins74s

    Evins74s Member

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    Does anybody know how much powder the factory puts in a round? I don't want to pull one apart to find out. The round in question is a 55gr fmj 223 rem.
  2. medalguy

    medalguy Member

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    The amount of powder doesn't matter much if you don't know which powder they use. Use your reloading manual to work up a charge for your own guns.
  3. steve4102

    steve4102 Former Guest

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    Why do you ask?
  4. Evins74s

    Evins74s Member

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    Just curious is all. I am new at reloading and I loaded some of my first rounds the other day, Hornady V-max 55gr w/23.0, 23.7 & 24.0gr of Varget powder. These loads are lite even compaired to what LEE Modern Reloading 2nd Edition says to start out at, which is 25.5gr.
  5. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum , first of all.

    I suggest that if the manual says the starting load is 25.5, you should stick with what the manual says. With that said, I will say that the Hornady #7 manual says the starting load is 22.8 with max being 26.4, so you should be OK with what you loaded. I don't know how old the Lee # 2 manual is, but I would also suggest that you pick up a couple of new manuals so you have more than one reference book.
  6. Evins74s

    Evins74s Member

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    I just got the manual about 3wks ago. I was looking at a friends manual that he got at a big name store and it said t start at 23gr so I did. Then I got my manual in the mail about 1wk later.
  7. steve4102

    steve4102 Former Guest

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    Cool, Manuals are invaluable. Do yourself a favor and forget about the data section of your new manual and read the entire front portion. The front half of your manual will tell you just about everything you need to know to be a safe and successful handloader.

    I said, "just about", come back here and ask these guys questions for the rest of what you need to know.
  8. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    The Manuals are the way to safe reloading. The manuals include recipes and should be followed to the letter. That means you use the primer they used, the bullet they used, the cases they used, and start at their starting load. Every item I listed impacts the gas pressure developed. Get it wrong and bad things happen including ruining your gun and hurting yourself and those shooting around you. The gas pressures can be up to 65,000 psi and more if you get it wrong. The pressures are so high they erode away steel in the barrel, eventually.

    Later when you totally understand reloading and have several manuals and have read them all multiple times (the "how-to" section in the front pages) you can deviate from the components called out in the manuals. The Hornady manual is particularly easy to understand with great illustrations of "how-it-works".

    Reloading is NOT like baking a cake. It can be very dangerous if not done correctly. So your first reloading task should be to buy several manuals and read and re-read them until you have a thorough understanding of what reloading is. BE SAFE!

    LDBennett
  9. steve4102

    steve4102 Former Guest

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    This is simply not true. It is impossible for treat load data as a recipe and follow it to the letter. It cannot be done. To do so you would not only have to have the same components used in the data you would have to have the same lot numbers, same temperature, same altitude, etc. and also the most important component of all the exact same firearm. Not a similar firearm the exact same one. As we know this is impossible, this is why every manual published will clearly state that their load data is only a guideline.

    To treat load data as a "Recipe" would imply that all data is safe. "If it's in the book and it's a recipe then it will be safe in my gun" attitude can get you hurt real fast.
  10. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    steve4102:

    You are missing my point. As I read and interpret Evins74s posts I think he is winging it too much. I am merely suggesting to him that he follow the instructions in the manual. If allowed variation at this point in his learning curve he may take too much line, so to speak.

    Newbies need to follow the manual to remain safe. Theses are recipies. That is, a list of components and measures meant to be followed for maximum safety. I also stated:

    "Later when you totally understand reloading and have several manuals and have read them all multiple times (the "how-to" section in the front pages) you can deviate from the components called out in the manuals."

    LDBennett
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  11. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    ... And some folks just gotta blow thier faces off to learn.. Hopefully its not the case here. ;)

    Bottom line.. ALWAYS start with the recommended starting charge listed for your bullet and powder and work up carefully. Learn what to look for during the process too. Pressures can mount to dangerous levels without warning. If one round seemed OK and the next nearly locked the bolt down, its probably not a good idea to go ahead and fire the next progressively hotter round until youve determined why the pressure spiked.
  12. oldgunfan

    oldgunfan Member

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    I think what he is asking is what the old XM193 military load was? I may be wrong but I think the best way you can replicate that load would be 55grn FMJBT 25 to 26grns (depending on the brass you use) of H-335 and CCI-41 military primer. everyone is right DON'T START THERE. start maybe at 24grns and work your way up.
  13. Evins74s

    Evins74s Member

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    Well I took the rifle out today, yes it was cold out, but all my rounds worked w/o a hiccup. Started off shooting factory ammo then went to my reloads. Started off with the 23 then 23.7, 24.6. These are the ones that I made going off of my friends manual. I also loaded 8 at 25.5 per my manual. The last 8 were hornady fmj @55gr. Once again no hiccups.
  14. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Its a good idea to get a chronograph, you can set it up to shoot over it as you shoot your groups so that way you can monitor the velocity of your handloads, if your rounds suddenly spike 150 fps on a .2 gr increment then thats a good indication something is wrong. ANd likewise for undercharges. Using too little powder can cause detonation, which is more dangerous in some cases than using too much powder.
  15. Regular Joe

    Regular Joe New Member

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    Good info, JLA. It's all but impossible to replicate a factory load, because ALL of the factories use a powder mix that is not available in canister lots, as we can buy. Using a chrony, along with your preferred powder is the closest you'll get.
    Pressure spikes are MUCH more likely with a hot barrel. Say you fire 10 rounds pretty fast, and then wait 3 or 4 minutes before you fire again. The round in the chamber will get VERY hot, compared to those in the magazine. This is why I really like the Hodgdon "extreme" powders, which are far less temp. sensitive. It's also why W-748 is known for pressure spikes. I'd rather fiddle a bit more with Varget to get as accurate as I can with it, than move to a temp. sensitive powder in search of that last 1/2" @ 200 yards.
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
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