Filler material for overshemed woodstock?

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by targetacqmgt, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    I took to much wood from a Mosin wood stock replacement -old stock was shot to h#ll. This is the first time I have ever done something like this and I finally got a good "fit" between the barrel and stock. But in some places I took too much wood out. Soooooo what kind of "filler" will adher to the wood but not the barrel???
  2. CHW2021

    CHW2021 Active Member

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    Acraglass. Glass bed a Mosin and post accuracy results. Be careful and it should work and not be noticeable.
  3. rhmc24

    rhmc24 Member

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    For that kind of thing I use a paste made of clear epoxy glue and sawdust of the kind of wood you are working with. I wax the barrel or other contact part and wax aluminum foil and place it between the wood and the metal.

    I use Devcon clear 2 Ton epoxy, not the 5 minute kind & I have done dozens of repairs with it. You mix fine sawdust with the glue, enough that it is thick enough that your paste doesn't run away.

    A good idea to do a couple test batches till you get the hang of it.
  4. nmckenzie

    nmckenzie Well-Known Member

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    +1 on this method. Though I've used Acraglas Gel and Devcon Steel Epoxy for bedding jobs, the clear epoxy and sawdust method works great for correcting relatively minor glitches. Whenever sanding stocks, I always corral some of the finer particles of sawdust and save it in child-proof prescription bottles (child-proof caps prevent a mess if the bottle gets knocked over). It's easy enough to test mix in small batches, and once hardened easily sanded to shape. True, the patch won't have any grain, but it'll be pretty much the same color as the rest of the stock.
  5. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    Thanks fellas. I will sand the old stock and give the epoxy/sawdust a try
  6. nmckenzie

    nmckenzie Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought; whenever I need more sawdust for a fixup, but don't want to go any further sanding the outside of the stock, I harvest material from under the buttplate. So long as it's not oil soaked it'll work fine, and the outside profile of the stock won't have been slimmed down any further.
  7. rhmc24

    rhmc24 Member

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    More about epoxy/sawdust filler. I save sawdust from my bandsaw in an old coffee can. It's more like saw chips than dust. Epoxy permeates the fine chips. I don't know of any advantage in powdery fineness.

    I have used this to do major fills, easily quarter inch and more. To economize on glue, I will roughly fit in a piece of solid wood and just fill around it. The epoxy mix is stronger than the wood it is used with, usually. Sometimes shotgun recoil knocks out a bit chip at the receiver interface. I fill it with my mix but to keep it from chipping out again, I put in a couple of pegs to take strain off the interface of mix to stock. Important in this case is to put in a sheet of plastic between the fill and the receiver and remove after. Otherwise your fill repair will have a better fit than the rest of the wood and take all the recoil.

    Color wise, epoxy is tolerant of most anything other than water base. I have used leather dye (dye, not wax polish), oil paint, acrylic, artists powders, etc. to improve color matcdh. Tiny amounts added usually give good results. Add a lot and you begin to affect the strength of the glue mix, which may or not be important to a fill job.
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2012
  8. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    More good info, especially about recoil shock. You guy must have been reading my mind;)

    Any particular brand of epoxy you would recommend??
  9. binlookin

    binlookin New Member

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    Lowe's carries Epoxy in larger bottles Approximately 6-8 oz. ? It cost about $15.00 and is as good as it comes. It will last you years, I've made repairs on Auto's, Washers, Dryers, reloading equipment, Gun stocks, wood etc. I have had it to fail on certain plastics, but that applys to most epoxy's.
    You can also make that repair with the same sawdust and Titebond or elmer's
    WATERPROOF wood glue. Be sure to remove all the oil from the repair area, there are several solutions that will do that for you if you don't already have one of your own, just do a search?
    What ever you decide on to use? If any part of your repair is going to show I suggest strongly that you test a spot maybe on part of the old stock or under the butt plate where you drilled out your 'dust' to be sure you are going to be satasfied with the results? You may need to re-test a few times but it's better than "Sure Wish#$%^&#$%#$ with the final results.
    binlookin
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
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