flat shooting bullets

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by BETH, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    does anyone here use them and can u get them in any caliber
  2. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    Beth do you mean flat trajectory ( low arc projectile)??

    thats speed and energy that will do that , what cal you asking about ??

    i use 22/250 to get a longer flatter trajectory than 22mag or LR much more energy , but basically the same projectile ( bullet)
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2011
  3. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    Jack i saw some ammo that was flat on the top?
  4. pkcgbifaid

    pkcgbifaid Member

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    Usually when I here talk about a "flat" shooting load, it has been accomplished in one of two ways.

    By taking a load to the higher end of the powder load/pressure range you get more velocity out of the bullet you are using. Since the bullet is traveling faster, it will get to the target at a given distance faster than a bullet fired at a standard or slower velocity. Since it gets there faster, wind and gravity have less time to affect the bullet path, thus it shoots "flatter" than a standard load.

    Another way you can get a flatter load is the bullet design itself. If you get a bullet with a higher ballistic coefficient, that means the bullet will cut through the air easier than a bullet with a lower ballistic coefficient. The easier it cuts through the air the less drag will slow the bullet down, helping it retain higher velocities. Then you are back to the previous description where more velocity means you get to the target quicker.

    Most of the people who I hear talking the most about this are long range rifle shooters and most of the bullets designed to have these high balisitc coefficients are rifle bullets (look up Berger bullets VLD {Very Low Drag} design).

    I'm not saying that they don't try the same things with handgun bullets. Hornady makes some handgun loads using a pointed polymer tip in the bullet design and claim flatter trajectories.

    Sorry for rambling. I don't know if this really answers your question or not.
  5. pkcgbifaid

    pkcgbifaid Member

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    Well, it looks like while I was rambling on you guys some more discussion and it turns out I wasn't answering your question at all!

    Sorry 'bout that! :)
  6. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    Beth do you mean like a wadcutter projectile ?

    pic to help you explain

    [​IMG]
  7. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    pkcgbifaid the question is rather vague but thats ok Beth is learning so we interpret the best we can , give it a bit and she'll be a expert ;)
  8. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Jack is right Beth. Flat shooting pertains to trajectory. Fast rounds usually shoot flatter than slower rounds.

    The bullets you saw with flat tips were for leveraction rifles. Most revolver cartridges are loaded with flat Point ammo because most revolver cartridgees are also chambered in leveractions with tubular magazines. the bullet points are flat because the tip of one rests on the primer of another in a tube magazine and could cause a discharge under recoil if they were pointy.

    pkc's info above is also correct.. Albeit very technical, but also very correct. When assembling a flat shooting centerfire rifle load you want bullets with high BC (ballistic coefficient) the higher the BC, the longer the bullet will retain velocity, and the longer it stays fast the further it flies before gravity pulls it back to earth.
  9. pkcgbifaid

    pkcgbifaid Member

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    Well jack, I was trying to do my best. I thought I was actually going to be the first one to answer someone's question for a change instead of just reading everyone else's answers!

    By the way... if pkcgbifaid gets to be too much of a fingerfull when typing, you can all just call me Kent.
  10. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Also, the tip of a bullet is known as the meplat. Usually powerful magnum hangun bullets have a very wide, blunt meplat because they are designed for use at short ranges and the wide meplat helps to transfer energy quickly and break bone on game animals. Long range rifle bullets have a very pointy meplat that raises BC and streamlines their shape helping them buck the variables against them like wind, gravity and atmospheric resistence.
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2011
  11. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Nice! Kent works.. pkcbifaid is indeed a finger full.. ;)
  12. Maximilian II

    Maximilian II New Member

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    +1. Nice to meet you, Kent!
    Now if you're Clark Kent, you know something about being faster than a speeding bullet and are a flat shooting projectile indeed!
    :)
  13. pkcgbifaid

    pkcgbifaid Member

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    Calling ME technical and then throwing around words like "meplat". Next you'll be teaching all about the ogive! :):)
  14. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    not to worry pk as they said i am still learning it is a wadcutter i saw thanks for picture Jack
  15. pkcgbifaid

    pkcgbifaid Member

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    Well, in that case Beth, the wadcutter bullet was essentially designed for paper target shooting. That bullet design will cut nice clean holes in a target as opposed a smaller central hole with tears coming out from it that you would usually see from a full metal jacket bullet.

    Hollowpoints and semi-wadcutters can act similar, but they still don't give the nice perfect circle a pure wadcutter does.

    Kent
  16. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    yep. wadcutters make purdy holes in paper. Makes scoring a target real easy
  17. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    thanks guys so is that why people use them prettier hole in target?
  18. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    yep. They actually suck for shooting past 50 yds. they very quickly destabilize and start to tumble. but from the barrel to 50 yds thay are great.
  19. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    ok guys thanks for the info
  20. Millwright

    Millwright Well-Known Member

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    Why would anyone want to shoot a flat ? :D

    If, OTOH, (as I presume), you're asking about a particular bullet, then we have some things to discuss. First off, Newton hasn't taken a vacation. Gravity still works at 32 feet per second/second on earth regardless of who makes the bullet - or cartridge, FTM - so "flat shooting" is sort of misnomer.

    All else being equal, faster bullet speeds from muzzle to target mean less time for gravity to do its work, so less "drop" occurs. This means less angular offset between the "axis of bore" and line of sight is required to have the point of impact co-incide with the point of aim with a faster bullet speed than a slower one. In practice - unless you're a sniper working at extreme ranges - this less a consideration than proper shooting technique and sighting. >MW
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