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George Foreman Grill Venison

Discussion in 'Ruffit's Domestic & Wild Game Cooking/ Recipe Foru' started by polishshooter, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

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    Tonight my wife cooked up 4 nice hind quarter strip steaks on the new George Forman grill from my button buck from last year to go with a nice healthy meal.

    Half an Idaho baker each with low fat sour cream, low fat cheddar, and green onions, a nice salad with olive oil and vinegar, a 9 grain baked baguette, and the venison done with the same spices she uses on the regular grill...not bad for a "ten minute meal...."

    Not bad, but she only did them for 3 minutes and they were overdone slightly.:cool: Not anywhere near how tender they would have done grilled nice and rare on the REAL grill.

    And they did not have the taste or color of cooking on a regular grill either.:cool:

    So far we like the new George Foreman Grill for chicken, and a few other things, but the Tuna Steaks from Friday were the same way, it said 6-8 minutes, I went 6 exactly, and THEY were overdone as well.

    SO my advice would be to go two minutes or less on venison, it cooks from both sides at once, so it cooks through much faster than one side at a time on the "real" grill. And adjust your cooking times on the grill for other meats accordingly, you can always put it back ON, but once overcooked you live with it....


    We named my big buck "George Foreman" since he was a fighter and now he's Grillin':p SO this morning I said 'Let's try George Foreman tonight on the George Foreman," :)but she suggested "Junior" for the first time just in case it didn't turn out and we knew Junior is "melt in your mouth" tender normally.

    Good call, "George" would have been much tougher overcooked.
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2011
  2. carver

    carver Moderator

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    I didn't get no invite!:mad:

    Not really! Glad you had a good meal, sorry I wasn't there to share it with you. We have tried severl things in the kitchen, and the George Forman grill is one of them. The wife caught a deal a few years back where they were giving away a George Forman Rotisserie if you bought the grill. We use the rotisserie much more than the grill. But the one appliance I like the best is an indoor electric grill. It has one large element in it. The food cooks over the heat, and the juice that cooks out of the meat falls on the element, gets burned up, and the smoke rises up to flavor the food. Unlike the Forman Grill, this thing makes the best, juicy, chicken, and fish you ever ate!
  3. Big ugly

    Big ugly New Member

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    Yeah Carver but cleaning the Element is a PITA,
  4. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Mine is like the one in the pic, but mine is oval in shape, instead of round. The element isn't a problem really, it is pretty much self cleaning, they do get red hot. You put some water in the bottom so the drippings don't stick. Mine also has a rail around the rack on top. That will let you flip the rack to get it a little further from the heat source. The one in the pic. don't appear to have this feature. These things sell for around $15 - $20, but they work!

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    Last edited: Mar 14, 2011
  5. Big ugly

    Big ugly New Member

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    The one I got is oval shaped, I love it, I just hate cleaning it LOL. My wife refuses to.
  6. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

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    Don't those types of indoor grills also end up smoking up the house?

    We generally use our outdoor gas grill on the porch heavily all year round, even at 40 below outside, and used to burn them out every other year.

    Two years ago my wife and I decided to splurge on an EXPENSIVE Stainless Charbroil grill at either Lowe's or Home Depot, thinking that we were sick of replacing every two years.

    It worked GREAT...for two years!:mad:

    The burners started rusting out over this winter and it quit working as well as it did, so I took it apart a week or two ago to see about replacing them, and I'll be dammed if the entire inside walls of it aren't rusting through, it would be a waste to try and replace the burners!

    WHYINTHEHELL would you put that much stainless on the OUTSIDE and not on the INSIDE where it MATTERS????? LOOKS???:mad:

    Heck, I just may go back to CHEAPER grills and expect to replace them every year or two....:cool:
  7. Roadkil

    Roadkil Member

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    I have been using the same Weber 22 1/2 charcoal grill for the past 18 years. Best 70 bucks I ever spent.
  8. carver

    carver Moderator

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    Not any more than frying food on the stove. You don't get that much smoke. Most of the drippings miss the cooking element, and wind up in the bottom of the cooker.

    Just about everthing made now is designed to be thrown away! Don't repair it! Replace it! Look at all the jobs that creates in countries like China, Japan, Singapore, Chillie, and a thousand other mostly 3rd world countries! I have a small outdoor grill made from a piece of 24" pipe that is way over 20 years old, made by a friend of my father-in-law.

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