Good "starter" gun."

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by senn.15, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. senn.15

    senn.15 New Member

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    At the end of this summer I finally turn 21 and I plan to purchase my first semi-auto firearm. I am planning on using my new firearm to get my conceal and carry permit as soon as possible. I would like some opinions on what you think would be a good choice for a "starter gun" and why.
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2008
  2. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    Along what lines are you thinking. Would you prefer a semi-auto or a revolver.
  3. senn.15

    senn.15 New Member

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    semi- auto
  4. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    seen.15:

    For a carry gun any of the new guns will do fine assuming they are 9mm or larger but there is more to carry then just getting the permit and doing it. You need to learn to shoot well through practice.

    I suggest you also budget either a 22 semi auto pistol or get a centerfire that takes a 22 conversion and get the conversion at the same time. Any 1911 takes one of several 22 conversions as do the Beretta 92's and a couple of other guns like the CZ75B (Kadet conversion). You practice, practice and practice with inexpensive 22 LR ammo. It takes time and practice to be able to shoot well. Another approach is an air gun that you can parctice with every day at home in your garage or even in your house or apartment if you use the appropriate trap (a 22 trap works great for pellets as it adds an extra level of safety to catching the pellets).

    The least expensive way to do it would be a carry gun with a 22 conversion if carry is your ultimate purpose for owning a gun. If just starting into guns and you want to build a collection then another pistol, perhaps a Ruger or Buckmark, is a good way to start along with your carry gun. Please do put emphasis on shooting well as that is as important as carrying the gun.

    LDBennett
  5. senn.15

    senn.15 New Member

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    I really do appreciate your concern about the practice issue but I am in pistol club at Ohio State and I shoot frequently at my home. Money is not a factor, I have scholarships for school and I work 2 jobs. I was more interested in what people find comfortable carrying and what is just a good quality gun.
  6. dusty9

    dusty9 Member

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    For a good, all-around carry gun, I would recommend either a Glock 19 or Springfield XD9. Both are 9mm's and medium size and very high quality and reliable pistols. Go to a range with rental guns and try both. For any number of reasons, you will probably prefer one over the other. Then get a good holster. This may take some trial and error to find the best one for you. Most people end up with more than one.

    There are other good pistols available, but I think the Glocks and Springfield XD's are as good as it gets.
  7. Both of those Dusty mentions are good choices, though for carry, I prefer something a bit smaller and more handy than the G19. If you like the 9mm, take a good look at the Glock 26, or the Glock 27 if you want a .40.
  8. Xaiver56

    Xaiver56 New Member

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    For Conceal Carry I use this:

    [​IMG]

    Taurus Millenium PT 138. It has been a great gun. It shot great right out the box, and is realiable. It is a .380 and holds 12 in mag and 1 in the pipe. I carry it with an inside the waist holster and it is fairly comfortable. Also the price was right at just over 300.00 new.
  9. senn.15

    senn.15 New Member

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    Holy tiny handgun...
  10. ciwsguy

    ciwsguy New Member

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    If CC is the goal, how about the Walther PPS? I also suggest you go to your local gun shop(s) and try some on for size. Pick one that fits your hand and best meets your needs caliber-wise. Once you find the models in which you are interested, report back about brands and model number(s) and any concerns you have.
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2008
  11. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    The baby Glocks are very good carry guns. The are best suited for OWB or IWB carry, For pocket carry or deep concealment check out the Kel-Tec's and Kahr's. Just something to remember, If you are gonna want to shoot it quite a bit, The ity bity pocket guns aren't usually the best range guns.
    This is what I carry 95% of the time it's Glock Model 30 and this is what I carry it in. It conceals fine for me and don't print and is a great range gun. I also have a Kel-Tec 380 that I carry when I ain't supposed to have one and it needs to be concealed deeply.

    Attached Files:

  12. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 New Member

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    A lot of if's and some lack of info.
    Find one that fits you in a caliber you like and can handle. Some great handguns just will not feel good to you so try as many as you can.
  13. Oneida Steve

    Oneida Steve Active Member

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    Bersa .380 automatic.
  14. Mosin_Nagant_Fan

    Mosin_Nagant_Fan Active Member

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    My first handgun was a Makarov in .380acp. If you want to get something like a .45, I' get a nice 9mm to practice with and work your way up. You can find 9mm for less then $600 (somewhere around the $500 range). I'd check with any local dealers for any deals or good used ones and look online, too.

    I'd look into the Glock 17 or 19 and the XD-9 or the Walther P-99.
  15. Vladimir

    Vladimir New Member

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    It is all about you. Find a range with rentals and throw down some bones to rent several guns between now and your birthday. Particularly if money isn't an issue, I mean glock and XD's are great guns, but if you find something you like better why not.

    Trust me, go shooting, and do lots of rentals. I was 100% sure I was getting a Glock, looking at other guns was only lip service for me, I had shot my dad's service Glock 22 over the years since I was 13, obviously it's what I was going to be most comfortable with. Wrong. Off the block I shot the XD better than the Glock, and instantly became a fan. Realizing the importance of trying others I continued, after several others including a Sig and a S&W M&P I decided the XD was still the gun for me.

    I wasn't in the market for a .45, but decided I'd try shooting one just for fun, rented the USP and re-fell in love. Not particularly for accuracy or comfort reasons, I just love the gun and all it's options etc. And don't get me wrong, I still love the XD, hopefully one will join my collection someday.

    So really, I don't think there can be any substitute for renting. I mean you can learn to fire any gun, in the end who really cares if you can get 3 bullets through the same exact hole, your attacker would probably prefer that anyway :D. But, since you have plenty of time there is no reason not to go out and try multiple guns.

    Unless you intend to keep your pistol buried in the sandbox outside, I'm not really sure what makes a good beginner's pistol. If you take care of your gun, it will take care of you. If you don't, how can you trust it will?
  16. user

    user Active Member

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    yeah, what he said...

    I think the variables, aside from how it feels in your hand, are weight (too light = too much recoil; too heavy = hard to carry); ammunition (9mm is probably the cheapest and most widely available cartridge with sufficient oomph to do the job for semiautos, but .380 and .40 have strong followings, too); and reliability/precision and accuracy (sig's and glocks are really reliable, you can fire them after they've been in a sand bath; but the cost of that reliability is sloppiness - the Kahrs on the other hand, are ultra-precise, but most quality control complaints are due to excessively tight tolerances and you absolutely cannot put sand in them).

    If you're sold on semiauto's (I would suggest a revolver, myself), I'd recommend the SigSauer p239r DAK. I think it represents the best all around compromise.

    And it's like renting an apartment, you either get nice neighbors, OR an olympic pool, OR free covered assigned reserved parking, OR an elevator; you can't have everything. But you can have reasonably friendly neighbors, a nice small pool, free parking near the building, and a two-story flight of stairs.
  17. BlkHawk73

    BlkHawk73 New Member

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    Very true! If one's serious about this then simply attending a basic 8 hr course filling in the form and thinking you're done with what's needed they're very wrong. If you're serious it's also more than just "i'll prcatice at the rnage" too. Get TOP-LEVEL training. You mention that "money is no object" ok, then you have no excuse not to attend one of the top-level training facilities such as Thunder ranch or Gunsite. You'll learn more there than the local basic course could even hope to teach you. There's reason why top-level shooters, professionals and police officers of all branches train at these facilites.
  18. Vladimir

    Vladimir New Member

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    Well come now, thanks to H&K you can get it all. A USP compact can be carried however you want, bought in any caliber you want, it is reliable, lifetime warranty, accurate, has excellent resale value. Pretty much the only thing you don't get is a pony. Well they can be hard to find too, but if money doesn't matter then... :D:D:D:D:D

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