Grandfather's Inherited Guns

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by JasonCA, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    I will be inheriting a few gun's from my grandfather; some are ones I have used to go out shooting with him. However, I will be splitting the guns between my brother. Someone in our family, who has a general knowledge of guns, gave us an estimate of how much the guns are worth. Yet, I am not sure how accurate the estimates are. And, I will be obtaining more information on the guns in the coming days.

    For now, I was hoping someone can just take a quick look over the list of guns and let me know the following:

    1) If any of the estimates for one of the guns may be way off?
    2) If I had to pick 4 guns, which one should I try to hold on to? You can just select the number in the list for that particular gun.

    I'm sure some guns in the list are more common then others. And some in the list may be on the more rare side; or maybe none are. So right now I am just trying to get a idea of what guns I should focus most of my attention on. Here are the list of guns ...

    #1) Dan Wesley 357 Magnum revolver, [$250]
    #2) Sterling Arms Sterling .22, [$100]
    #3) Browning .32 (produced between 1930-1940), [$200]
    #4) Sterling .22 pistol revolver (can fire .22 long rifle cartridge), [$250]
    #5) Sterling .22 semi-automatic pistol, [$100]
    #6) Canadian Centennial '67 Winchester Rifle, [$1000]
    #7) Glen Field Model 60, .22 Long Rifle, single action, [$150]
    #8) Winchester 30-30. , [$500]
    #9) Remington Short-Long .22 rifle, [$100]

    Any feedback is appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason
  2. 21bravo

    21bravo New Member

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    jason,
    first, welcome to the forum.. hope that you stick around for a while.

    second, i offer my condolances for your loss

    if it were me id try to hold on to the firearms that had the most sentimental value. i would definatly try to hold on to the '67 winchester if at all possible. if you can.. post some pics the shape the firearms they are in has a lot to do with what they are worth
  3. w1spurgeon

    w1spurgeon New Member

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    Check the two big auction sites on the internet. You can get a good appreciation of what these guns bring in the real world. I agree with the previous comment on the Winchester....go for this one first. It has more investment potential than any of the others.
  4. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    #1 - Dan Wesson 357 (most likely. Dan Wesley?) is a little low. I'm thinking at least 300. More if it has extras - extra barrels, extra grips, pistol case.

    #2 & 5 - Sterling was an inexpensive pocket pistol made up 'til the mid 80s. They made several different models of 22 automatic, and they are all worth 100 or less.

    #3 - Browning 32 auto. Unless it is in really crappy shape, it is probably worth closer to 400 than to 200.

    #4 - Sterling revolver. Can find no record, anywhere, of Sterling making a revolver.

    #6 - Canadian Centennial Winchester. A commemorative (which is what this is) has value only as long as you have all the paperwork that came with it, have the box it came in, and it has never been fired. Once any of that changes - you lose the paper, the box gets destroyed, you shoot the gun - it becomes a shooter. A post-64 Winchester 94 shooter is worth, maybe 4 to 500. I pulled up a couple of auctions on a search. There was one that had never been fired, but had box but no papers. 406 dollars. One that had never been fired but no box or papers. Open at 519. No bids. One with box and papers, but the sleeve that went around the box was missing. 425.

    #7 - Glenfield Model 60. One of the most popular 22 autos ever made. One of the reasons is, for most of it existence it sold for less than 90 bucks. I'd say 75 is closer to its real value than 150.

    #8 - Winchester 30-30. Those were made for close to 110 years. Values can run from around 300 to many thousands of dollars, depending on the age, condition, extra features, etc.

    #9 - Remington 22 rifle. Too many to pick from without further information.

    You want advice on which four to keep? Let me go the other way - which to get rid off. Dump the three Sterlings. Then you only have six to choose from.

    I'd probably keep the 357. I'd definitely keep the Browning. Keep one of the 22 rifles and one of the 30-30s.
  5. GMFWoodchuck

    GMFWoodchuck New Member

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    I'd keep them all. For what little you're going to get for most of them you may as well as keep them and use them.
  6. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    Thank you all for your replies. Thank you Alpo for taking the time to give specific answers per each gun.

    As I said in my original posting, I will be obtaining updated information on the guns. I was made aware that the original gun listings were NOT as accurate as I thought. I have since taken a look at the guns personally and have determined that these are the actual gun models:

    #1) Browning Model 1922, [$200]
    #2) Hi-Standard .22 Long Rifle Model M-101, [$100]
    #3) Sterling .22 L.R. Auto (Gasport N.Y), [$100]
    #4) Dan Wesson 357 Magnum Model 15, [$250]
    #5) H&R (Harrington & Richardson) .22 LR Model 999 Sportsman Revolver, [$250]
    #6) Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial 1867-1967 20'' octagon barrel, [$1000]
    #7) Single Shot Remington .22 Short.Long or Long Rifle (The Junior Special) Model 521-T, [$100]
    #8) Marlin Glenfield Mod 60 Cal 22 L.R. Only Rifle (Made from 1960-present), [$150]
    #9) Marlin EST 1870-MICRO-GROOVE BARREL-MOD.336 CAL. 30-30 WIN., [$500]

    Other comments suggested I get rid of most of the Sterlings. However, I see now that only one of them is really a Sterling. The rest are differnet types of guns.

    Considering that this is the case, I am wondering what guns I should lean towards keeping (If I can choose only 4 of the guns)? Also, how far off do you think the price quotes are for what each gun is worth?

    Also, when I get a chance I am going to post a picture of each gun. I think it's fun and nice to know what each gun looks like so people can see what they are. I will be working on getting those pictures.

    Any feedback is appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jason
  7. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Per your updated list: :p

    1- If it is in any kind of shape at all, I'd still keep the Browning.

    2 - High Standard 22s are pretty good, generally, but the Dura-Matic 101 was kinda at the bottom of the list, and then you have the problem of finding magazines for guns that are out of production. I'd sell it.

    3 - I'd still get rid of that Sterling.

    4 - This is a possible. In my opinion, everyone needs at least one good self-defense/home-defense pistol. Of the guns on your list, this is the only one that fits.

    5 - I'd keep the 999. Everything I have heard says the H&R 22s, while inexpensive, were pretty damn good.

    6 - I'd sell it. Like I said before, it only has value as long as it is never touched. And what good is a gun that you can't shoot. And, since it was made to never be shot, there is always that possibility that it does not shoot good. But the only way to find that out is to shoot it, and then you've lost 50% of its value.

    7 - If you have kids, or grandkids, or expect kids, or your wife is a small woman that wants to shoot, then I'd probably keep this. But, if your wife is large enough to handle a full-size gun, or you have no kids and don't expect any, I'd sell it and keep

    8 - this one. A multi-shot semi auto, as a general rule, is going to be a more useful gun than a single-shot. So, I would keep one of these two 22 rifles.

    9 - Now here's the difficulty. This one is also a maybe. It's a hell-for-strong 30-30. It's stronger than a Winchester. But it is also heavier. That does make it kick less, though. Do you plan to hunt? 30-30 has, at one time or another, taken every type game animal on the North American continent. It ain't the best for everything, but it has worked. If the fecal matter strikes the rotary occilator, it would be best to have something that would take down your average Mutant Zombie Biker.

    So, I'd keep the Browning, but I like old guns. And I would sell the Marlin, but I don't like Marlins. Just a personal thing with me.

    But, for your average non-gun-nut, it would make more sense to keep the Marlin.

    So I guess my recommendations would be, for keepers
    H&R 22
    One of the 22 rifles, depending on your situation
    Marlin 30-30
    Dan Wesson 357

    That should give you a fairly well-rounded beginner's battery.

    I did a search on the High Standard. 250 seems to be closer to the value than 100.

    I still think your Browning price is waaay low.

    The Winchester commemorative sold new for 125, and was valued at 450, NIB, in my 2003 Blue Book. I seriously doubt that it has more than doubled in value in the past 6 years. I think it is closer to 500.

    I'm not sure what the EST 1870 means in #9. If you mean you estimate it was made in 1870, that's off. They didn't start making 336s until 1948. You can get a new one for just over 400. http://www.commandsurplus.com/product_info.php?products_id=76122&cPath=7273&source=googlebase A used one usually sells for between 250 and 300.

    #8 - You might want to read this forum page. http://www.sksboards.com/smf/index.php?topic=41142.0 I found two at auction. One sold for 100. The other opened at 90 and got no bids.
  8. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    I'll start posting some pictures of a few of the guns from my listing of 9 of the guns from above...

    #1) Browning Model 1922 Type WaA140, was originaly told it is worth about [$200]

    Attached Files:

  9. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #3) Sterling .22 L.R. Auto (Gasport N.Y), [$100]

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  10. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #4) Dan Wesson 357 Magnum Model 15, [$250]

    I like the look of the grip on this one.

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  11. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #5) H&R (Harrington & Richardson) .22 LR Model 999 Sportsman Revolver, [$250]

    Attached Files:

  12. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #6) Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial 1867-1967 20'' octagon barrel, [$1000]

    Attached Files:

  13. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #7) Single Shot Remington .22 Short.Long or Long Rifle (The Junior Special) Model 521-T, [$100]

    Attached Files:

  14. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #8) Marlin Glenfield Mod 60 Cal 22 L.R. Only Rifle (Made from 1960-present), [$150]

    Attached Files:

  15. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    #9) Marlin EST 1870-MICRO-GROOVE BARREL-MOD.336 CAL. 30-30 WIN., [$500]

    Attached Files:

  16. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    The type is a WaA140 since I forgot to mention that in the list. So this one I would say is a bit more rare to come across?


    The #2) Hi-Standard .22 Long Rifle Model M-101 is the only one that I haven't been able to find an equal to when searching. I noticed the grip on my grandfathers M-101 is different from others I have seen. The ones I have seen say on the riffle ".22 LONG RIFLE 583.801". Mine says ".22 LONG RIFLE 583.800". What does the 583.800 signify? And, I believe this gun is a bit more common? If I gave this one up, I can always get another pretty much just like it?


    It's that small looking gun. It's one that you would think a girl can wear in a holster on her leg under her dress. At least that's what I think when I see it because it's so small.


    I like the look of this gun. I've heard the barrels on this gun are interchangeable? When looking at the gun, it looks like the front barrel can be switched out with a different barrel. I could be wrong though. I like the grip on this one though.

    Is it rare to find? If I gave this one up could I find one pretty much like it?

    I suppose the only value in this gun is that's it's more on the rare side? Or, it's difficult to find in good condition?

    Maybe if I have a kid someday. I do not have one yet. I'll have to look more at this one.

    I am actually fond of this gun because it's the gun I fired most with my Grandfather when I was younger. But, I believe this gun is also more typical? And I believe they still make this model still today? So, if I gave this one away, I could replace it quite easily. This one does have more sentimental value though since I have used it the most when I was younger.

    So this one is similiar to the "#6) Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial 1867-1967 20'' octagon barrel". But this Marlin 30/30 is also more common then the Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial. I could easily find this Marlin then I could the Canadian Centennial one?


    I do like the Browning. It seems a bit more unique and rare too.

    I could always become a gun-nut in the coming years, especially now since I will be inheriting some.

    I will be thinking of which 4 I will want. I think the favorite so far is the Browning. The rest I need to think about....or for people to continue to give me suggestions as to which I should keep or get rid of.

    Yes :)


    I haven't posted pictures of this one yet. I will do so as soon as I can.

    Agreed.

    So it's between the Winchester commorative and the Marlin 30/30...hmmmm..... If I have to choose? *pondering*

    I added the picture. Take a look at the gun in the picture and you'll see that 'EST 1870' is written right on it.

    I will take a look :)
  17. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    Any other suggestions as to what guns are among the most interesting, rare, harder to re-purchase, or useful?

    Thanks!
  18. JasonCA

    JasonCA New Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    Thank you all for your input! I am very grateful!

    Based on everyones input, I have created a list of what guns I think pair up with each other based on my reasons explained below. These are the top 8 in the list of 9 guns I have posted earlier. The “#3) Sterling .22 L.R. Auto (Gasport N.Y)” is not in the list because it seems that there is a consensus to get rid of the Sterling. And, it seems to be the single gun among all the others that also has the least value as well. So for sake of discussion, I will drop that gun and focus on the other 8 guns below.

    Keep in mind, that among these 8 guns I need to split them with someone else in my family. So, I can only keep 4 of the guns. And someone else in my family will get 4 of these guns as well.

    Below are guns each within their own pairs that will get split (I choose the pairing). Please keep in mind that I can't simply choose all the best guns. I have to give and take. So here's what I am thinking about as far as what I am giving to take. The gun that I don't choose in that pair is the gun that someone else in my family will get to have.

    1st Note: The # orderings are based off my prior posting of all 9 guns.
    2nd Note: All pricing below is @100 percent based off of “The Blue book of Gun Values, 29th Edition”

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    1st pair:

    #6) Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial 1867-1967 20'' octagon barrel, [$595]
    #9) Marlin EST 1870-MICRO-GROOVE BARREL-MOD.336 CAL. 30-30 WIN., [$325]

    The reason that I paired up these guns to split is because they are both 30/30's and because someone else in my family agrees with me that we both should end up each with a 30/30; it seems to be the agreed basis. As for me, I am leaning right now towards keeping the Winchester 30/30 Centennial instead of the Marlin. The trade off is that the Marlin can be used for shooting and the Winchester would be used for hanging up on a wall or stored. So the question is do I want a gun I can use to shoot with or one that I can hang up on the wall? In this case, it seems someone else in my family would rather have the gun that shoots. So, I don't mind ending up with the Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial. I may not be able to shoot it, but it's a nice gun to hold on to.

    I choose: #6) Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial 1867-1967 20'' octagon barrel, [$595]

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    2nd pair:

    #7) Single Shot Remington .22 Short.Long or Long Rifle (The Junior Special) Model 521-T, [$395]
    #8) Marlin Glenfield Mod 60 Cal 22 L.R. Only Rifle (Made from 1960-present), [$145]

    To me, both are these are guns seem to be for first time shooters; for instance, taking your son shooting for the first time. I would also say that the the Marlin Glenfield Mod 60 is the cheapest among the 8 guns and it still is made today. So, I could always pick up another Marling Glenfield Mod 60. However, it is also a bit more special to me because it's the gun I have used a lot when I first started shooting with my Grandfather. On the other hand, the Remington Junior Special Model 521-T is a gun that is a bit more expensive, a bit more rare (since it's an older gun), but doesn't have much sentimental value to me. Also, it's a lock and load type shooter and I'm not too crazy about those. So, to me I will trade the Junior Special and keep the Marlin Glenfield Mod 60. Here I loose value wise, but I am compromising which is really what this is all about.

    I choose: #8) Marlin Glenfield Mod 60 Cal 22 L.R. Only Rifle (Made from 1960-present), [$145]
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    3rd pair:

    #2) Hi-Standard .22 Long Rifle Model M-101, [$300]
    #4) Dan Wesson 357 Magnum Model 15, [$285]

    Now it gets tougher. I like both of these guns. However, I am leaning towards the Dan Wesson 357 Magnum Model 15. I personally think this gun really looks good. And, I like that the gun has interchangeable barrels. Also, among listing all of the 8 guns, everyone seems to have said that I should hang on to the Dan Wesson and gave me reasons why. For instance, this type of Dan Wesson is no longer made I believe as of 2008? And, so I heard the value of these Dan Wesson guns may go up? On the other hand, I have heard people say the Hi-Standard M-101 is a good gun too. But, I still don't know too much about the M-101. When I first saw the M-101 though, I did think the gun was a bit more odd looking. My Grandfather never let me shoot this one. Perhaps someone can give me more feedback on the M-101? In any case, the Dan Wesson and Hi-Standard seem to fall in the same price range as well.

    I choose: #4) Dan Wesson 357 Magnum Model 15, [$285]

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    4th pair:

    #1) Browning Model 1922 Type WaA140, [$425]
    #5) H&R (Harrington & Richardson) .22 LR Model 999 Sportsman Revolver, [$425]

    I think the H&R Model 999 looks like a good gun and the one I could inherit from my Grandfather is in wonderful condition and comes in it's original box. Also, the price of the H&R Model 999 seems to be on par with the price of the Browning. So, I think the H&R and Browning are a good pairing because they seem to be pretty good guns (in some ways for different reasons). The Browning, to me, seems to have more of a history. Though I am sure the Browning has a more simplified design than the H&R. I am leaning towards keeping the Browning Model 1922 over the H&R Model 999. Sort of giving away a good H&R Model 999 to keep the Browning.

    I choose: #1) Browning Model 1922 Type WaA140, [$425]

    ------------------------------------------------------------

    If anyone thinks there is a better pairing of the guns, let me know! I'd love to have feedback from people regardless of what it is. It does help me to think about things more. So, all in all these are the guns I would end up keeping:

    #6) Winchester 30/30 Canadian Centennial 1867-1967 20'' octagon barrel, [$595]
    #8) Marlin Glenfield Mod 60 Cal 22 L.R. Only Rifle (Made from 1960-present), [$145]
    #4) Dan Wesson 357 Magnum Model 15, [$285]
    #1) Browning Model 1922 Type WaA140, [$425]

    Seems about fair right?

    Looking forward to feedback!
  19. D_Kansas

    D_Kansas New Member

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    So what happened?
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