Hamilton .22

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by SARG, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. SARG

    SARG Member

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    Could the experts please provide information regarding the Hamilton rifle pictured?

    Attached Files:

  2. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    Minn-eeee-sota, ya, sure, you bet!
    Hi Sarg........welcome to TFF. :)

    "In 1882, Clarence Hamilton being a businessman and owner of a small building in Plymouth, Mi. got together with investors and started the Plymouth Iron Windmill Company. The iron windmill business went no were, lasting only a few years. Before the plant and business fully closed, Clarence went in partnership with a friend who had invented an all-metal air rifle. At that time only wooden air rifle existed.

    In 1895 the Iron Windmill plant was producing more air rifles then Windmills. While manufacturing air rifles, Clarence had ideas of manufacturing low cost boys’ rifles and began to designs inexpensive methods of manufacturing rifle barrels and rifles. At that time, .22 cal. rifles were referred to as Boys’ rifles because of their size. In 1898, Clarence sold his portion of the air rifle business (know as the Daisy Air Rifle Company) and the Iron Windmill company. The two company’s move out and the Hamilton Rifle Company of Plymouth, Michigan was born. At the same time Clarence son, Coello completed tool and die training. Two years later Clarence died and Coello took over the rifle business.

    From 1898-1945 the Hamilton’s invented and manufacturer good quality affordable .22 cal. rifles. There were 14 different models; retail cost averaging $2.00-$ 5.00 per rifle. Other rifle companies where charging $10.00 and up per rifle. In addition to the rifles low selling price, good marketing and advertising made the Hamilton Rifle Company the most popular and successful boys’ rifle company of its time.

    Retail Company’s who sold products such as magazines, costume Jewelry, etc. door to door would use the Hamilton rifle as a promotion, offering a free rifle to those who made their quota. Feed Companies promoting their products would randomly place a rifle in feed sacks. If you where lucky enough to buy the right sack, you got a free rifle.

    In the early 1900s, boys short on money would unsuccessfully try to repair the worn or broken firing / locking mechanism, instead of having a gun smith repair it. Due to this practice and other factors, an estimated 99.9% of the million Hamilton rifles produced are in Rifle Heaven, making the existing good condition rifles excellent collectable.

    During WW II (1942) the company stopped rifle production and made parts for the war effort. In 1945, after the war, boys’ rifles lost their popularity and the company closed its doors."

    Here's some specific info on the Model 27 you have:

    http://home.comcast.net/~jimringbauer/model27.html

    The Standard Catalog of Firearms gives the following values to the Model 27 Hamilton:

    V.G. - $300
    Good - $200
    Fair - $150
  3. williamd

    williamd New Member

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    "Hamilton .22 Cal. Rifles"

    2001- 2007 Hamilton Rifle Web Page's ......... Special Thanks to Wesley E. Powers, “Rifle Historian & Collector” for providing the Rifle Photos.
    Hi! Your long search for Hamilton Rifle information is over.

    Yes! I know how you feel, for two months my son and I searched the web, visit gun shops, bookstores and libraries. I even asked a friend of mine who teaches at Michigan State University to help us fine information on now my son's Hamilton Model 027 Rifle,that's been in the family for 78 years.

    Our search ended; when I found this old book at an antique bookstore that covers a lot more information about the Hamilton Rifle Company and its rifles then I could put in this Web page.

    Below is a short interesting start to finish story about the Hamilton Rifle Company.

    Followed by Individual Rifle Information.

    In 1882, Clarence Hamilton being a businessman and owner of a small building in Plymouth, Mi. got together with investors and started the Plymouth Iron Windmill Company. The iron windmill business went no were, lasting only a few years. Before the plant and business fully closed, Clarence went in partnership with a friend who had invented an all-metal air rifle. At that time only wooden air rifle existed.

    In 1895 the Iron Windmill plant was producing more air rifles then Windmills. While manufacturing air rifles, Clarence had ideas of manufacturing low cost boys’ rifles and began to designs inexpensive methods of manufacturing rifle barrels and rifles. At that time, .22 cal. rifles were referred to as Boys’ rifles because of their size. In 1898, Clarence sold his portion of the air rifle business (know as the Daisy Air Rifle Company) and the Iron Windmill company. The two company’s move out and the Hamilton Rifle Company of Plymouth, Michigan was born. At the same time Clarence son, Coello completed tool and die training. Two years later Clarence died and Coello took over the rifle business.

    From 1898-1945 the Hamilton’s invented and manufacturer good quality affordable .22 cal. rifles. There were 14 different models; retail cost averaging $2.00-$ 5.00 per rifle. Other rifle companies where charging $10.00 and up per rifle. In addition to the rifles low selling price, good marketing and advertising made the Hamilton Rifle Company the most popular and successful boys’ rifle company of its time.

    Retail Company’s who sold products such as magazines, costume Jewelry, etc. door to door would use the Hamilton rifle as a promotion, offering a free rifle to those who made their quota. Feed Companies promoting their products would randomly place a rifle in feed sacks. If you where lucky enough to buy the right sack, you got a free rifle.

    In the early 1900s, boys short on money would unsuccessfully try to repair the worn or broken firing / locking mechanism, instead of having a gun smith repair it. Due to this practice and other factors, an estimated 99.9% of the million Hamilton rifles produced are in Rifle Heaven, making the existing good condition rifles excellent collectable.

    During WW II (1942) the company stop rifle production and made parts for the war effort. In 1945, after the war, boys’ rifles lost their popularity and the company closed its doors.

    CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING MODEL NUMBER FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, PHOTOS & VALUES.

    "MODEL 7" "MODEL 11" "MODEL 15 & 19"

    "MODEL23"
    "MODEL 27" "MODEL 027" "Japanese Model 027"

    "Modify Rifle "Pistols"

    "MODEL 31" "MODEL 35" "MODEL 39"

    "MODEL 43" "MODEL 47"

    "MODEL 51" "MODEL 55"

    Rifle Owner's E-MAIL

    Have Rifle comments, questions or photos E-Mail Jim at the following Address:

    Hamiltonrifle@comcast.net
  4. wonderwhippet

    wonderwhippet Active Member

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    Around 1940 I remember Popular Mechanix magazine had ads offering kids a Hamilton rifle if they would sell a certain amount of a product called "Cloverine Salve". I think it was about a dozen bottles you had to sell for 25 cents apiece, then you sent the money to the company and they sent you a Hamilton rifle. I think in those days the rifle retailed for about two bucks, so I guess they made a buck or so on the deal.
  5. punchie

    punchie Member

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    Seems to be in amazingly good condition. Because these were 'boys' rifles most suffered the use, abuse and neglect of youth. Quite awhile ago I queried the ATF on the status of a 'less than 16 inch' barrel Hamilton as to if it was considered a Class 2 AOW, especially as how the brass bore had been shot out and there was no longer any rifling. I never did get a straight answer.
  6. 358 winchester

    358 winchester *TFF Admin Staff*

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    Dang I learned a lot from this thread
  7. SARG

    SARG Member

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    My many thanks for this wealth of information!
  8. SARG

    SARG Member

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    *Wow... saw my post from 4 years ago pop up & I thought I was dreaming*
  9. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    Welcome to the TWILIGHT ZONE - da da da da da da da da
  10. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    Another "Hamilton .22" you might find of interest. This is the Japanese clone from the '60s when three companies in three California cities, each imported a few of these neat little rifles with their company name stamped into the right side of the receiver.

    [​IMG]

    Mine pictured is from Sierra Arms in Los Angeles, and still retains its original box. Unfortunately it's missing its original rear sight. It would really be a great find if some collector could obtain ALL THREE clones!

    [​IMG]

    This clone duplicated the Hamilton Model 027 and it's generally agreed that it was a better built gun than the original. Sales were disappointing for the importers and it has been estimated only about 250 were imported before the companies cancelled further orders.

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
  11. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    FFF,
    Thanks for posting - dang, learned something new already today.
  12. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    Hi, Jim. I was happy to see your tribute to Bill Goforth. Bill was a great asset to our collecting fraternity. I will miss his vast wealth of knowledge.

    We lost another great gun info contributor this month: Dan Shideler, Editor of Gun Digest passed away earlier this month. Dan will also be sorely missed by we collectors.

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
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